New Firefox points out unsecure login page - Ford Bronco Forum
 4Likes
  • 1 Post By schwim
  • 2 Post By fullsize
  • 1 Post By schwim
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-08-2017, 08:50 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
nra1ifer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Good ol' USA
Posts: 246
Bronco Info: 1981 w/302
iTrader: (0)
Garage
New Firefox points out unsecure login page

Firefox got updated to v52.0. Now it notifies when sites are unsecure (http://) as opposed to secure (https://). The login page here is unsecure (I had not noticed that until now).

Can it be secured?

nra1ifer

MADE America Great Again!!!!
nra1ifer is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-08-2017, 09:02 PM
Fullsize Member
 
bargeahead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Central IL
Posts: 154
Bronco Info: '81 XLT, 302, manual w/granny, manual transfer case, manual hubs
iTrader: (0)
Garage
Same here. I have my login saved in regular mode but always get on using private window.

I don't figure the CIA/NSA would have a problem even with a secure site if they were interested. Other hackers, the same. The only safe way is to totally go off the grid.

So I just go ahead and login.

If you can't or won't stand behind our troops and law enforcement; feel free to stand in front of them.
bargeahead is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-08-2017, 10:26 PM
Resident Nice Guy
 
schwim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Western NC, US
Posts: 1,250
Bronco Info: 1979 Ranger XLT, 351m, 4 speed
iTrader: (0)
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by nra1ifer View Post
Can it be secured?
Yes it can, by installing an SSL certificate for the domain. Will Autoguide do it? That's highly doubtful, since at a glance, it looks like all of their forums are lacking one: Automobile Reviews, Videos, Pictures and Automobile Prices

It's a shame, since you can get them for free nowadays if you have access to the server's OS.
nra1ifer likes this.

This is my signature. There are many like it, but this one is mine.
My signature is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life.

Schwim! A social site with an identity crisis.
schwim is offline  
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-09-2017, 01:39 PM
Administrator
 
fullsize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 811
iTrader: (0)
We are actually working on rolling it out on the network in a way that doesn't involve a third party like suggested.

Kyle
BikerPepe` and nra1ifer like this.
fullsize is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-09-2017, 02:17 PM
MidlifeCrisisUndrWay
 
CDA 455's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: 43rd 'Gem' State
Posts: 732
Bronco Info: '94 Bronco, 4" lift with front Air Lift/TRE Flip Upgrade/rebuilt E4OD (To PS specs)/33" BFGs.
iTrader: (0)
Firefox.


I haven't used Firefox since Microsoft copied it for their Windows 10.

μολὼν λαβέ

CDA 455 is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 12:10 AM
Fullsize Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Collin county, TX
Posts: 3,718
Bronco Info: Brick Nose on 15x10s/32s with leveling coils
iTrader: (2)
firefox no approves your log in.
GetBent4x4 is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 12:04 AM
Registered User
 
turpit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: limbo
Posts: 1,793
Bronco Info: 93 XLT
iTrader: (0)
https is barely more than a placebo. All it means is that a Transport Security Layer, or the older, obsolete Secure Socket Layer is in use. All they do is encrypt data transmission. It does not provide any from of protection beyond that actual transmission....meaning for example if you have a keylog<script id="gpt-impl-0.5748675601881015" src="https://securepubads.g.doubleclick.net/gpt/pubads_impl_111.js"></script>ger on your system, everything you type is capturred before you ever send it, making TLS or SSL pointless. It the system youre communicating with is compromised, or selling your data, neither SSL or TSL provide any protection. It does nothing to protect stored data or prevent access to that data....it is only one small part of the total protection requirement.

In short, it pretty much only protects from kiddie hackers trying to catch your wireless transmission or cell signal. Anyone smart enough to physically or electronically tap hardlines or hack directly into a system/cell wont be wasting time to try and crack encrpted transmissions....they are going straight for the stored data.

And, if youre worried about government spying, just turn off your wireless router, disconnect your cable and/or turn your computer/cellphone off. TLS and SSL arent even slowing the government from getting your data.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verndewd
You're about as observant as a blind deaf mute in a sensory deprivation tank.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander Stoklosa
After all, a world without enormous, fuel-sucking trucks with suspensions capable of bombing across the Baja at 80 mph isn’t a world worth living in.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BikerPepe'
Punching a weatherman in the nose has been on my bucket list for decades!
turpit is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-26-2017, 09:25 AM
Resident Nice Guy
 
schwim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Western NC, US
Posts: 1,250
Bronco Info: 1979 Ranger XLT, 351m, 4 speed
iTrader: (0)
Garage
LOL "Keyloggers exist, so secure data transfer between endpoints is useless". That's some bulletproof logic, there Lou. Going by that, VPNs, TOR, encrypted drives and everything else is also a waste of time since you could have a keylogger installed.

SSL/TLS is supposed to be one part of many in a secure data transaction. It's not a placebo, it's not a farce and it's not useless. It works to secure one aspect of your data transfer. If you're not doing anything else to ensure a secure transaction, then of course it's beneficial impact is lessened but that doesn't mean it's not doing it's job and it's job isn't to keep dumbasses from inadvertently installing loggers.

Certs can be installed incorrectly, the script at the other end could have vulnerabilities open to exploit and and issuers can even screw up the process but again, that's not the cert's job either. It's job is to encrypt data from your ethernet port to the connecting server's.

Don't think that's important? Well, the millions of people that have had their entire browsing session scooped up while on a public wifi connection(like a coffee shop or hotel) would disagree. To get these people on TOR or in a VPN would require hurdles that the average user can't easily jump while an SSL connection resolves the issue during the transfer process without any extra effort on the user's part. They didn't have to do anything to make it encrypted and anyone viewing that data would be unable to use it.

As for the government, again, it's not the cert's job to keep Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Verizon, etc. from sharing all your data with them. The gov't's hoovering of everything they can get their hands on is not happening during the transfer of data between the two points. It's done either on your computer(application backdoor) or it's simply being handed to them by the corporations.

This is my signature. There are many like it, but this one is mine.
My signature is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life.

Schwim! A social site with an identity crisis.
schwim is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-29-2017, 03:03 AM
Registered User
 
turpit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: limbo
Posts: 1,793
Bronco Info: 93 XLT
iTrader: (0)
Wow, flashbacks of Steve83

Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
LOL "Keyloggers exist, so secure data transfer between endpoints is useless". That's some bulletproof logic, there Lou.
Please point out where I stated such a thing, as I can find no such statement or inference in my post. You can not because I said no such thing

There is a difference between the existence of a thing and the use of a thing.

And my statement is absolutely correct. If you have a keylogger on your system, SSL and TLS are useless as the data has already been compromised.

Was it your intent to deny that statement? Or were you merely employing the old Feinsteinien tactic of belittling a fact by attempting to affect an air of superiority? Either way it matters little, as protecting the transmission is moot if the data has already been violated. This point will be addressed in greater detail later. We will label it point X for future reference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
Going by that, VPNs, TOR, encrypted drives and everything else is also a waste of time since you could have a keylogger installed.
Interesting.

That’s exactly what it means. No form of encryption (including SSL and TLS) is secure if the encryption key has been violated. If the security key has been violated then the system has already been accessed and compromised and every other aspect of security was already circumvented or bypassed.

You do realize that almost every form of data encryption (whether it be hardware or software) revolves around keys, be they called PINs, Passwords, ciphers, keys, etc, and are binary, hexadecimal, punch cards (in the old days) or even Little Orphan Annie’s secret decoder ring, etc,. yes?

And that once that key is violated, any protection afforded by said encryption is voided.

And you do understand that the primary purpose of VPNs and TOR are simply to provide an IP buffer/alternate IP/alternate IP routing to make tracing an origin point i.e. target system, more difficult…..that they have nothing to do with the actual encryption of data yes?

And that these things do nothing to prevent installation of any form of malware such as a keyloggers, All they do is make it harder to locate or identify a target system.. And then only for the specific port they are using. And even then, the common ones I know of do nothing to hide the MAC address or any HIDs/DIDs, meaning that no amount of router hopping/spoofing can prevent a target system from being identified and located.
And many of the “free’ ones are actually scams, designed to lure the innocent into installing malware. You do know that, Yes?

Those things which actually block malware, the firewalls, (be they hardware or software) AVS, secure comm software (and by secure I don’t mean any type of alternative networking, I mean actual comms software that controls and restricts port access.) function independently of other layers of security.

And there in lay the ultimate irony of all the forms of “security” mentioned. You can use TLS through a VPN on a secure port over TOR, and yet that data can be decrypted and transmitted through an unsecured port as fast as it is received, negating all of those “security” implements, if the key has been violated. By any means including malware. Such as a keylogger.. In short, data encryption, without key protection is worthless.


Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
SSL/TLS is supposed to be one part of many in a secure data transaction.
Yes. And that is precisely what I said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
....it is only one small part of the total protection requirement
After re reading my statement, I fail to see how is could be construed, in any manner, as implying anything different than what you stated in your retort.


Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
It's not a placebo
I did not say it was. What I specifically stated was:

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
https is barely more than a placebo
Which I further expounded on by stating, correctly, that

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
All they do is encrypt data transmission. It does not provide any form of protection beyond that actual transmission
Which is exactly what it does. And only what it does. Which I will adress further. We will lable that Point Y


Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
it's not a farce and it's not useless.
Again, I ask: point out where I stated such a thing, as I can find no such statement or any such inference in my post.

I never called it a farce or useless. Please don’t Steve83 words into my mouth

What I did say (for the second time) was:

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
https is barely more than a placebo
Which I further expounded on by stating, quite correctly, that

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
All they do is encrypt data transmission. It does not provide any form of protection beyond that actual transmission
Which is exactly what it does, and only what it does. See Point Y. Again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
It works to secure one aspect of your data transfer.
Which (for the third time) is exactly what I stated

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
All they do is encrypt data transmission. It does not provide any form of protection beyond that actual transmission………….. it is only one small part of the total protection requirement

Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
If you're not doing anything else to ensure a secure transaction, then of course it's beneficial impact is lessened but that doesn't mean it's not doing it's job…..
I did not say it was not “doing its job”. I clearly stated that it encrypts the data transmission. That is its job. That is its only job.
As I stated, again:

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
…it does not provide any form of protection beyond that actual transmission
Quote:
Originally Posted by scwhim
and it's job isn't to keep dumbasses from inadvertently installing loggers.
Nowhere did I state that its job was to prevent installation of malware. I quite clearly stated what its purpose was. Though I didn’t call anyone who gets scammed into installing a keylogger
Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
dumbasses
which, as it happens to be, is the vast majority of the American computing public. There’s a reason I point this out. And that point will be forthcoming. We will label that Point Z


Quote:
Originally Posted by scwhim
Certs can be installed incorrectly, the script at the other end could have vulnerabilities open to exploit and and issuers can even screw up the process but again, that's not the cert's job either. It's job is to encrypt data from your ethernet port to the connecting server's.
Which, has nothing to do with my statement, that HTTPS is little more than a placebo. And oh, by the way, security certificates can be deliberately falsified as well. And your tangential comment only goes to corroborate what I correctly stated in the first place, again:

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
All they do is encrypt data transmission. It does not provide any form of protection beyond that actual transmission
You have now attacked the same point I made, no less than 3 times, and made a few tangential arguments, not addressing my point at all.

I can only surmise, perhaps incorrectly, that you read just the first few words of my post, became emotional and had a “Brittany” moment .resulting in a failure to comprehend,

And Im serious. Your response really comes off as:

WqSTXuJeTks

I surmise this as, in reading your reply, you make a point. The same point in fact that I made. But you reiterate it no less than 3 times…in an attempt to discredit that very same point. Confusing, no? And then to reiterate that, you make a few tangential excursions.
.
Which is why I suspect you became ‘emotional’ and didn’t comprehend what I wrote. Had you read my full post, I believe you may have realized that, avoiding all this unnecessary unpleasantness.


Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
Don't think that's important? Well, the millions of people that have had their entire browsing session scooped up while on a public wifi connection(like a coffee shop or hotel) would disagree. To get these people on TOR or in a VPN would require hurdles that the average user can't easily jump while an SSL connection resolves the issue during the transfer process without any extra effort on the user's part. They didn't have to do anything to make it encrypted and anyone viewing that data would be unable to use it.
First, I must ask you to please state where I made a statement that something was not important. I did not. What I did say again, was that HTTPS was little more than a placebo. And again, I will come to that momentarily.

The irony in that statement is that it would appear “the millions of people” you are referring to seem to be the same people you referred to as
Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
dumbasses
only a few lines earlier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
As for the government, again, it's not the cert's job to keep Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Verizon, etc. from sharing all your data with them.
And I believe I covered that when I stated:

Quote:
Originally Posted by turpit
And, if youre worried about government spying, just turn off your wireless router, disconnect your cable and/or turn your computer/cellphone off. TLS and SSL arent even slowing the government from getting your data.
Yes, I am quite sure my statement covered that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by schwim
The gov't's hoovering of everything they can get their hands on is not happening during the transfer of data between the two points. It's done either on your computer(application backdoor) or it's simply being handed to them by the corporations.
^^^^^^^^^^^see the above^^^^^^^^^^^


At this point I am quite confused. I don’t know if your serious, or baiting me…..its difficult to say as you keep attacking my point………..by repeating the same point.

None the less, the moment has arrived when I will attempt to clarify further, and expand.

Point Y
HTTPS is barely more than a placebo.

I chose the word placebo very deliberately, and with exceptional care. And I stick to it.

pla•ce•bo
noun: placebo; plural noun: placebos
1) a harmless pill, medicine, or procedure prescribed more for the psychological benefit to the patient than for any physiological effect.
2) a measure designed merely to calm or please someone.


To wit: Those people you called “dumbasses” are the vast majority of the American computing public. They are not, as you label them, “dumbasses”. Not everyone has the time or wherewithal to learn the details of computer security let alone the complexity of how computers and data storage actually work. Nor do they have the time to spend investigating and identifying which of the endless ‘security measures’ currently available are real, placeboes or actual malware. In short, they can chose to trust or not trust that when someone advertises a security service or piece of hardware, it will do the job.

Point Z

They don’t understand that all HTTPS means it TLS or SSL…..point to point data transmission encryption

They don’t understand that their data is just as vulnerable on the receiving side of a connection as the point of origin and that all SSL or TLS are doing is affording some protection to the data for that very, very brief moment of time that it is in transit between systems.

But they see the “S” at the end of HTTP, and because they don’t know better, and because someone told them the “S” in HTTPS stands for “secure” they believe that means the actual site they are communicating with is secure, and thus that their data will be secure.

Just as they believe the placebo they just took is going to cure them. It isn’t. All the placebo does is provide a false sense of well being, which may or may not manifest itself as a psychosomatic improvement, but is not real..

Which is precisely why I said “little more than….” because unlike a placebo, the SSL and TLS actually do something. And that statement is accurate.

What TLS and SSL provide is very, very little, but it is something. Which I clearly explained.

Points X

But those millions of “dumbasses” (as you label them) don’t know that. And many of the companies that ‘hype’ their ‘secure’ connections in their advertarding prey on that very ignorance…..deliberately using the S in HTTPS to promote a false sense of security.

And in the end, those millions of people are not protected, in any way shape or form. Not by SSL or TLS, nor by a VPN. Or any form of encryption. When the security key has been violated, or when access to other routes is unprotected.

Now as to the millions of people in the internet cafes, or other wifi hot spots who had there browsing sessions scooped that you seem to be worried about, are NOT being protected by SSL or TLS, unless they have secured their network itself You do understand that, yes?

Just as I was not protected by SSL or TLS, or manner of security protocols when OPM was breeched and my PII along with my security clearance was violated. Nor were the other 19.7 million people whose PII and security clearance information was violated. OPMs SSL:/TLS didn’t slow the violators down a bit. As those violators didn’t bother wasting their time trying to hack communications.

https://www.wired.com/2016/10/inside...us-government/

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendan I. Koerner @ wired.com
The routine nature of OPM’s business made the revelations of April 15, 2015, as perplexing as they were disturbing. On that morning, a security engineer named Brendan Saulsbury set out to decrypt a portion of the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) traffic that flows across the agency’s digital network. Hackers have become adept at using SSL encryption to cloak their exploits, much as online vendors use it to shield credit card numbers in transit. Since the previous December, OPM’s cybersecurity staff had been peeling back SSL’s camouflage to get a clearer view of the data sloshing in and out of the agency’s systems.

Soon after his shift started, Saulsbury noticed that his decryption efforts had exposed an odd bit of outbound traffic: a beacon-like signal pinging to a site called ¬opm¬security.org. But the agency owned no such domain. The OPM-related name suggested it had been created to deceive. When Saulsbury and his colleagues used a security program called Cylance V to dig a little deeper, they located the signal’s source: a file called mcutil.dll, a standard component of software sold by security giant McAfee. But that didn’t make sense; OPM doesn’t use McAfee products. Saulsbury and the other engineers soon realized that mcutil.dll was hiding a piece of malware designed to give a hacker access to the agency’s servers.

And no one was protected by TLS, SSL or any other form of security during the Ebay breach of 2015. 145 million records breached.

Or the Yahoo breach of 2014 (only disclosed in 2016) 500 million accounts breached.

Or the Target breach of 2013. Over 100 million accounts breached.

Or the Tricare breach of 2011. Over 5 million vets and family member’s accounts breached

And on and on and on and on.

And that’s just a few of the breaches that were publicly acknowledged. Within the US.



World?s Biggest Data Breaches & Hacks ? Information is Beautiful
(careful, don’t click the embedded links on that site, theres some hinky stuff going on}

And that doesn’t even scratch the surface. It does not address the untold number of people (literally, untold) whose PII and/or financial data has been violated.

Such as the Amazon breach a few years ago.

And Im not referring to Amazons ‘little’ login data breech last year. The one Amazon publicly admitted to. Im talking about the big breach from several years ago that was (and is still) kept hush-hush to protect Amazon’s image. Except for the little fact that millions of people suddenly received new credit cards with different account numbers in their mail immediately afterwards…because Amazon made a back door deal with the credit card companies to keep the reason for the replacements quiet.


And in none of those cases, acknowledged or hidden, did SSL or TLS do anything to protect people.

That’s not the millions you seem to be worried about. (Who are not receiving any substantial protection by SSL or TLS anyway, because they are probably using windows, which means they have dozens of coms enabled .exes on their computer, any one of which can be accessed directly without bothering to try and go through a secure socket layer.)

That’s not 10s of millions.
Or hundreds of millions.
Thats Billions,
Just within the US.

And our population is only 320 million meaning everyone has been violated more than once.

Why?

Because, the professional hackers don’t waste their time trying to crack SSL or TLS. Not because its too difficult, but because it is literally a waste of their time.

Why try to capture a single credit card number from somebody placing an order on Amazon from an Internet café or in an airport with wifi when you can strike the data repository and snag millions of credit card numbers along with all the PII needed to validate those accounts? These people are not the ones wasting their time using using stolen credit cards or stolen data to gain thousands of dollars.,They are the ones auctioning it off in blocks on the deep web for big $$$$. Or using it for other, even more nefarious purposes. To be sure, no one ran out and ‘charged’ a new car using my security clearance as a form of payment…..not possible. But access classified information? Well that’s a different story.

As I stated, the only people trying to breech TSL or SSL are the kiddie hackers. The uneducated newbs who are going for individual credit card accounts or cell phone data. Because they don’t know better. Yet.

The professionals don’t waste their time

So when I say HTTPS it little more than a placebo, that is exactly what I mean, and it is a correct statement.


And whats the funny part of all this? If you oh, I dunno, say read the adress bar on your browser, then you can read for yourself whether its HTTP or HTTPS. Dont need an app or udpate for that.


Now, a question for you: What do you think is more important? The poor millions who lost their browsing sessions or emails at the local internet café because it didn’t have SSL, or the billions who have lost their PII/savings or worse to sites that did have SSL?

As a side note, you wouldn’t happen to be a DNC speechwriter? By any chance the one that thought having Hillary refer to half the country as a basket of deplorables was a good idea? Say, as good an idea as referring to millions of people as dumbases?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verndewd
You're about as observant as a blind deaf mute in a sensory deprivation tank.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexander Stoklosa
After all, a world without enormous, fuel-sucking trucks with suspensions capable of bombing across the Baja at 80 mph isn’t a world worth living in.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BikerPepe'
Punching a weatherman in the nose has been on my bucket list for decades!
turpit is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-29-2017, 08:38 AM
Resident Nice Guy
 
schwim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Western NC, US
Posts: 1,250
Bronco Info: 1979 Ranger XLT, 351m, 4 speed
iTrader: (0)
Garage
Wrote a snippet for you so we can facilitate and streamline our Thuper Theriouth Internet Argument:

Code:
$ANGRYNUM = 0;
while($ANGRYNUM < 500 ){

    /quote/ARGWARBLGARBLEANGRYQUOTE.$ANGRYNUM//quote/

    RESPONSE LITTERED WITH RIGHTEOUS FURY.$ANGRYNUM

    $ANGRYNUM = ++$ANGRYNUM;

}

echo" end with tired derogatory meme to ensure knowledge that I find the person I'm discussing this issue with to be little more than a petulant child";

// At this time, fist bump self.

exit();
Let me know if 500 loops is enough for you. From the looks of your last reply, we may need to push that up a tiny bit.
miesk5 likes this.

This is my signature. There are many like it, but this one is mine.
My signature is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life.

Schwim! A social site with an identity crisis.
schwim is offline  
post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 03-29-2017, 03:43 PM
Harley's & Bronco's FTW!
 
BikerPepe`'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: N.E. WA
Posts: 32,985
Bronco Info: '95 XLT, 5.8/E4OD/MassAir/6" lift/4.56's/35x12.5 BFG AT-KO2
iTrader: (4)
Garage
oh FFS... put the keyboard back in your pants. nobody cares whose is bigger.

@turpit - I've been happy to see you showing back up on the site recently, but I have to say... you seem much more antagonistic as of late than I remember.
Steve is gone... as the kiddie movies say... "Let it go". While a debate between techies geeking out on each other is all well fine and good, there's simply no reason to take it to the level of personal insults that you chose to employ.




none of this is helping anyone on the site or the owners of the site, so... locked

"When life throws you a curve... LEAN INTO IT!"

SuperMotors - Since 2002

Last edited by BikerPepe`; 03-29-2017 at 04:05 PM.
BikerPepe` is offline  
Closed Thread

  Ford Bronco Forum > Welcome > Suggestions, Feedback & Site Help

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Bronco Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself. DO NOT USE Gmail.com accounts. If you only have a Gmail.com email please contact the administrator here

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome