Removing & Installing AOD Tranny on 86 [Archive] - FSB Forums

: Removing & Installing AOD Tranny on 86


equin
03-10-2004, 03:26 AM
Just thought I'd post my experience after removing the tired, beaten down AOD, and later re-installing it after being rebuilt. It took Performance Transmissions in Kennedale, TX (DFW area) only two days to rebuild. They added a "Superior" shift kit and Kevlar overdrive bands - total, including torque converter and tax, was $795 (versus $350 - $450 for a regular AOD rebuild).

This is my first tranny removal and re-installation. I followed the instructions in the Haynes and Chilton's manuals for the procedure. Rather than bore everyone by repeating the step-by-step procedures listed in those manuals, I thought I'd give my own added experience while trying to follow and implement those procedures. I'm sure experienced tranny experts will find this write-up boring, but thought it might benefit shade-tree mechanic wannabes like me who've never done it and are considering whether to do it themselves.

A transmission jack or a transmission jack adaptor is a definite plus. I borrowed a transmission jack adaptor from a buddy once I discovered they cost about $100 new. For those who don't know what it is (I never heard of it until I decided to do the project myself), it's an apparatus that sits where the black steel "puck" goes on a hydraulic jack. You just remove the puck, and sit the transmission jack adaptor on top of the jack where the puck is supposed to go. It then "holds" the transmission in place with the help of a chain so that it doesn't slip off the jack.

I practiced with the tranny jack adaptor by using it to drop and remove the transfer case (Borg Warner 1345) which is much lighter than the heavier AOD. The chain that came with the adaptor was perfectly suited for the lighter t-case, but I later found it was not big enough for the AOD. You may want to go get a bigger, thicker (3/8" thick) chain from Home Depot. I got a 5' piece for $3 that I used to wrap around the tranny and adaptor to hold it on tight. I also used a clevis hook to close the chain together

When I dropped the tranny, I did not have the hydraulic jack completely underneath the Bronco. Instead, I had the jack in a perpendicular position with the jack handle outside by the door of the Bronco. Big mistake. The weight of the tranny was too much and caused the jack to tilt to one side. It made getting the tranny out from underneath the Bronco a little scary, until the tranny pretty much just slipped off and slammed into my concrete driveway. Luckily nothing bad happened. Lesson learned is that I should have slipped the whole hydraulic jack underneath the Bronco and lined it up with the tranny before securing it to the adaptor.

I used one of those big aluminum drip pans that you can get at any parts store (they look like big cookie sheets) to place underneath the tranny and slide it out from underneath the framerails. I'm sure a piece of cardboard would work just as well. (Unless you get the Bronco high enough, the tranny, while secured to the tranny jack adaptor, will not fit underneath the framerails).

Sliding the tranny out from underneath helped me realize just how heavy these suckers are. Be real careful with your back (mine was sore for a day after I did this). I'm too much of a weakling to pick it up myself, and I didn't have a buddy with me to help me load it up onto my truck, so I used an engine hoist that I borrowed from another buddy (it helps to have buddies with lots of good tools and equipment, even if they don't join in the fun of wrenching with ya - lol). The engine hoist had a warning sticker on it saying its intended use is for lifting engines only, but I didn't have any other contraption to use, so I used it to lift it and load it onto the back of my pickup truck. The 3/8" chain I got at Home Depot worked perfectly for using it as a lifting point once I secured it to the tranny (it also helps to remove the torque converter from the bellhousing to make the tranny a bit lighter and to prevent the torque converter from falling out while lifting it).

Two days after I dropped the tranny at the shop they called to say it was ready. Now the fun begins. I again used the engine hoist to unload it from my truck. I carefully placed it on the tranny jack adaptor which I adjusted to fit snugly around the oil pan. I then wrapped the 3/8" thick chain around the tranny and adaptor to secure it tightly and to keep the tranny from slipping off the adaptor.

When it came time to slip the tranny and jack underneath the frame rails, I remembered that the truck was not high enough off the ground. My jack stands were maxed out to their highest, safest point already, and my other hydraulic jack (the more hydraulic jacks you have, the better - I only had two with me this time), with a lifting height of 21", could not lift it up high enough. I had to use a couple of blocks of wood on top of the jack's puck to get one side of the Bronco high enough to allow the tranny to clear (the adaptor causes the tranny to sit kind of high off the ground to begin with). The top block of wood split in half and crushed, so maybe it wasn't such a good idea to use them, but luckily it worked long enough to push the tranny underneath the framerails. Once the tranny cleared, I lowered the Bronco back onto its tires so that the back of the engine wouldn't be so high. In hindsight, I probably should have left the rear tires on the ground while allowing the front to sit a bit higher. This would've forced me to keep the tranny's front tilted upwards to avoid having the torque converter slip forward.

The hydraulic jack holding the tranny has one of those two piece jack handles. I disconnected the top piece so that only the bottom half was left. This allowed me to slide the whole tranny, jack and handle underneath the Bronco, with the whole thing facing forward. I did not want the weight of the tranny to cause the jack to tilt on its side like it did when I removed the tranny.

Now for the really hard part - lining up the tranny bellhousing to the engine block. It took several hours of struggling and cursing to finally get it lined up perfectly (I'm sure an experienced tranny expert could do it in a few minutes, but since this was my first time, it took me awhile). After I bolted it up, I tried to turn the engine crankshaft by hand using a socket wrench to check that all the torque converter bolts had gone through the flywheel bolt holes. But the crankshaft would not budge. Being an uneducated newbie, I thought maybe the tranny was in park and wouldn't move. So I called the tranny shop, which then told me that the crankshaft and torque converter should move whether it was in park or not and that the torque converter had most probably slipped forward, possibly resulting in a damaged oil pump - oops! What this meant was that I had to go through the trouble of unbolting the tranny from the engine and checking the torque converter for any damage.

After removing all the bolts and separating the tranny from the engine, I took out the torque converter and didn't notice anything wrong inside the hub (where it connects to the tranny input shaft). So, hopefully it's OK, but who knows? I guess I'll find out when it comes time to drive it. I then put the torque converter back onto the input shaft and pushed it in all the way while turning it (I had to do this while laying on my back underneath the Bronco, of course). As I lined up the tranny to the back of the engine, I double-checked to make sure the flywheel bolt holes lined up with the torque converter bolt holes (had to turn the crankshaft by hand to do this). After struggling and cursing a bit more (but this time not as long as the first time), I managed to line up the tranny and bolt it up again, making sure that the front of the tranny remained tilted upwards a bit so the torque converter wouldn't slide forward (it helps to lower the jack adaptor a bit while using another hydraulic jack to push up on the tranny bellhousing, thus maintaining a negative rake on the tranny). I can only guess that the torque converter was pushed back all the way onto the tranny input shaft since I was later able to turn the crankshaft, flywheel and torque converter by hand using a socket wrench. Hopefully the pump and torque converter is OK, but only time will tell!

Next up will be my experience adjusting the throttle valve (TV) cable, which I hope to have time to do this weekend. Hope this helps anyone considering to remove and re-install their Ford transmission themselves.

blksn955.o
03-10-2004, 04:30 PM
I blew my aod in my 90 in late Nov. and after a weeks of delays and other things (swapped in a np208 and got rid of my push button crap) I finaly got it all in and adj. my TV cable last Sun. That guage was a bia bia to put in since it was right by the damn exh. and all. Now all I have to do is fix/deal with a broken pass. side manifold that one of the bolt holes/ears fell off the manifold.

equin
03-10-2004, 07:35 PM
I blew my aod in my 90 in late Nov. and after a weeks of delays and other things (swapped in a np208 and got rid of my push button crap) I finaly got it all in and adj. my TV cable last Sun. That guage was a bia bia to put in since it was right by the damn exh. and all. Now all I have to do is fix/deal with a broken pass. side manifold that one of the bolt holes/ears fell off the manifold.

Yeah, I read the instructions in the Haynes manual on adjusting the TV cable, but I'm still trying to understand the procedure. Have no idea where to get that little spring thingy with the 10 lbs. of pull pressure. Would an auto parts shop carry that? Or is that some kind of dealer only spring thingy?

You mentioned something about a gauge that goes by the exhaust? What gauge is that? Is that to adjust the TV cable? The exhaust on mine is on the passenger side, while the TV cable is on the driver's side. Or do you have true dual exhaust?

By the way, was your NP208 a direct bolt-on?

Dustball
03-11-2004, 02:42 AM
Yeah, I read the instructions in the Haynes manual on adjusting the TV cable, but I'm still trying to understand the procedure. Have no idea where to get that little spring thingy with the 10 lbs. of pull pressure. Would an auto parts shop carry that? Or is that some kind of dealer only spring thingy?


Follow these directions...

http://www.tccoa.com/articles/tranny/index.html#

Lookinfurfun
03-11-2004, 11:23 AM
I just got doing the E4OD on mine this past weekend. I used a similar tranny adapter for the jack. We also had the truck jacked up about 36" for clearance of the frame. Just slid the tranny in and out.

Here is the tranny adapter

http://www.superford.org/getfile.php?id=111111&toggle=fullsize&f=Old tranny.jpg

equin
03-11-2004, 01:13 PM
Follow these directions...

http://www.tccoa.com/articles/tranny/index.html#

Thanks for the link, Dustball. I've seen those same instructions before somewhere else on the net. Kind of hard for an inexperienced newb like me to understand them, though, but I'll keep researching and studying til I feel comfortable enough to try it. Thanks again and take care,

equin
03-11-2004, 01:15 PM
I just got doing the E4OD on mine this past weekend. I used a similar tranny adapter for the jack. We also had the truck jacked up about 36" for clearance of the frame. Just slid the tranny in and out.

Here is the tranny adapter

http://www.superford.org/getfile.php?id=111111&toggle=fullsize&f=Old tranny.jpg

That's the same tranny adapter I used! How did you get your truck jacked up to 36"? Did you have a special hydraulic jack for that? The only ones I've been able to find in the parts stores go up to 21".

blksn955.o
03-11-2004, 01:49 PM
on the aod the TV pressure port is on the Pass side its the middle one of 3. it has TV cast into the case just below it. You use the guage to set the press. at 30psi (35psi if you use the ford tool). My bronco is a 90 and needed a spacer that went in at the cable at the t-body, and I adj. the sliding sleave of by the t-body with the tool and guage and when the guage was at 35psi I set the lock and pulled the spacer. My directions were very unclear but My girls dad and her uncle helped me since the uncle is a 20year vet. of a local SVT dealer who is a Sn. master mech. and ford deisl. cert. and my girls dad owns a snap-on franchise so I was able to have acess to the ford tool and guage.

blksn955.o
03-11-2004, 01:54 PM
As far as direct bolt on the t-case itself did bolt on directly as all ford t-cases have the same mouting pattern along with the spline count on the trans all being 31. The problem I came too was with the rear D.S. I had to have my end of the double cardian swapped to a diff. style so it would bolt to the yoke. there are 2 diff. types of yokes (at least) and they have diff. spline counts so you have to swap the ends of the joint.

BTW if you go to a junk yard get a trans. tunnel cover from a manual shift f150 and use it, it will be a much cleaner install since the non-manual shift cover has a rather large bump in the middle making the hole a lot longer, needing a realy,realy, long boot. I hope to get one soon.

Lookinfurfun
03-11-2004, 02:56 PM
That's the same tranny adapter I used! How did you get your truck jacked up to 36"? Did you have a special hydraulic jack for that? The only ones I've been able to find in the parts stores go up to 21".

Lots o' wood :toothless


Highlift helped quite a bit.

BTW...The tranny adapter was only $30 at Harbor Freight.

equin
03-11-2004, 03:38 PM
on the aod the TV pressure port is on the Pass side its the middle one of 3. it has TV cast into the case just below it. You use the guage to set the press. at 30psi (35psi if you use the ford tool). My bronco is a 90 and needed a spacer that went in at the cable at the t-body, and I adj. the sliding sleave of by the t-body with the tool and guage and when the guage was at 35psi I set the lock and pulled the spacer. My directions were very unclear but My girls dad and her uncle helped me since the uncle is a 20year vet. of a local SVT dealer who is a Sn. master mech. and ford deisl. cert. and my girls dad owns a snap-on franchise so I was able to have acess to the ford tool and guage.

Thanks for the great info on the TV cable adjustment and the t-case swaps.

equin
03-11-2004, 03:40 PM
Lots o' wood :toothless


Highlift helped quite a bit.

BTW...The tranny adapter was only $30 at Harbor Freight.

Yeah, I used blocks of wood to jack it up higher also. I tried using the hi-lift, but couldn't get it high enough - probably because mine's a 48" one. I didn't realize Harbor Freight had the tranny adapters for so cheap! They were $99 at Sears and at the local parts store.