How to double flare brake lines [Archive] - FSB Forums

: How to double flare brake lines


Larston
05-15-2006, 11:57 PM
DISCLAIMER: This is one of those operations where if you screw up, you could kill yourself or others around you. If you are not 1000% sure of your ability to do the job, leave it to a professional!

There have been a few questions lately about repairing hard brake lines. I had to make a repair to the rear brake line on my Jeep today (yeah, Jeep, get over it :D) so I took the opportunity to shoot some pics of the process.

The correct way to make or repair brake lines is to use double flaring. A single flare is simply flaring the end of the tube. A double flare actually folds the wall of the tube back over itself giving a very strong, compliant seal essential for brake lines. Single flaring results in a thin pipe wall at the base of the flare where the brake line will work harden and break over time. A single flare also will not conform to the inverted flare inside the fitting properly which causes it to leak. The double wall on a double flare compresses and conforms to the inverted flare and crushes to create the seal. Because of this, a double flare joint is considered to be a single use joint. However, people do get several disassembly/reassembly cycles out of them. This limited life cycle is why converting to AN fittings on a truck that gets taken apart a lot is cost effective. The seal design of AN fittings is intended to be taken apart many times with no loss of sealing effectiveness.

Making a double flare end on a brake line is actually very easy, but does require some practice to get right. It is common to make the flare off center or cocked to one side. Practice on scrap pipe until you get the hang of it.

It is crucial to have a decent double flaring set to make good double flares. This kit is from Harbor Freight and is marginal for making good flares. It’ll get the job done if you’re very patient and pay strict attention to detail.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324352/fullsize/DoubleFlareKit.jpg

This is the repair piece I made to put into the truck. The original pipe broke where the rear flex line attached. I bought a repair section from Napa, bent it to match, cut it to length, and reflared the cut end.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324362/fullsize/RepairPiece.jpg

This is my Mighty Mite tubing cutter, available almost everywhere tools are sold. This is a super little cutter and easily gets into tight places. To use the cutter, slide the cutter over the pipe and position the blade where you want to make the cut. Tighten the knob until the blade just touches, then snug it slightly. Twist the cutter one or two turns and tighten the knob again. Repeat until the cut is complete. Don’t over tighten the knob or you’ll crush the pipe and have to start over. As you may have guessed, I flared this pipe before installing the threaded fitting :doh0715:
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324354/fullsize/TubingCutter.jpg

Here is the finished cut. The tubing cutter collapses the outer edge of the tube slightly. Some people remove the burr to open up the pipe again, some don’t. I don’t. The double flaring operation opens the pipe again to the correct diameter, so it’s not worth getting chips and filings inside the pipe.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324355/fullsize/LineCut.jpg

After installing the threaded fitting onto the pipe, place the cut pipe into the flaring frame. The flaring frame is marked for different pipe sizes. It is cut with a countersink on one side, be sure the cut end of the pipe sticks out on that side. Select the correct flaring anvil from the kit. The anvils are also marked for pipe size. Most brake line is 3/16. Using the anvil, make sure the pipe sticks out of the flaring frame the width of the anvil flange. If it doesn’t stick out far enough you won’t have enough metal to get the double flare. If it sticks out too far, you’ll get a distorted bell and possibly too small an inside diameter for the finished flare. Tighten the flaring frame nuts securely. If they are loose at all, the pipe will simply push out of the frame when you start making the flare.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324356/fullsize/MeasureLineEnd.jpg

Place the tip of the anvil into the end of the pipe. Using the flaring press, force the anvil into the pipe until the anvil sits flush against the flaring frame. This forms the button on the end of the line. The button is formed by the countersink in the flaring frame and the countersink in the anvil.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324357/fullsize/AnvilSeated.jpg

This is the finished button. For some European cars, this is the finished flare, but not for our Broncos. Loosen the press and remove the anvil from the pipe. Do not remove the pipe from the frame yet. Center the taper on the flaring press into the center of the pipe and tighten the press securely. This collapses the upper bell on the button into the inside of the flare.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324358/fullsize/ButtonDone.jpg

With the flare done, remove the pipe from the flaring frame and inspect it to make sure it’s square and centered relative to the pipe. If the flare is not square and centered, cut it off and start over.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324359/fullsize/FinishedEnd.jpg

Here is the finished repair. Inspect all joints for leaks after bleeding. The double flare must be collapsed to seal the joint, so it may take a few rounds of tightening to eliminate all leaks.
http://www.supermotors.org/getfile/324360/fullsize/FinishedRepair.jpg

And that’s all there is to it! If you’ve practiced your technique, taken your time, and been very anal about the details, you will have a flared brake line joint that’s as good as the factory’s. :thumbup

massbronco
05-16-2006, 12:07 AM
thanks. i always wondered how to double flare a brake line

MikE2
05-16-2006, 01:59 AM
Good write-up

Few things I'll add, DON'T forget to put the fiting on first. There have been times I have had to cut the flare off 3 times untill I remembered to install the fitting. Also install it the correct way.

Also don't afraid of overtightening it, they have to be very tight to seal up.

And one more thing, with the double flare, the sealing edge is actually the outside of the line, so if your working with an old line use some 000# or 0000# steel wool to polish the line out so its smooth. Don't use sandpaper as it can put fine grooves in the steel and possible have a leak. Or at least if you do use sandpaper turn the line on it so the grooves are going around the line, not paralell with it

Larston
05-16-2006, 08:32 AM
Few things I'll add, DON'T forget to put the fiting on first. There have been times I have had to cut the flare off 3 times untill I remembered to install the fitting. Also install it the correct way.
I'm horrible about this myself. I tend to add 1/2 inch or so to most line lengths so I can cut off at least one flare because I forgot to put the fitting on. Most lines can handle the extra length if I don't screw up.

81Bronk36
05-16-2006, 08:49 AM
That was good, I did it on a worse vehicle, a Chebby Blazer so dont feel bad. One thing I noticed, it may have been my kit but it said to bevel the edges of the tube, I could not get the flare to colapse in without it, it would just superflare out.

Larston
05-16-2006, 08:54 AM
That was good, I did it on a worse vehicle, a Chebby Blazer so dont feel bad. One thing I noticed, it may have been my kit but it said to bevel the edges of the tube, I could not get the flare to colapse in without it, it would just superflare out.
I'd be a little cautious of a kit that couldn't do what mine does: perform the flare on a straight cut end. I've used kits from all the big tool manufacturers and they worked without having to doctor the tube. Not sure why your's was different, but it would be worth digging into a bit. I suspect the anvils may not have been as good as they could be.

jermil01
05-16-2006, 09:55 AM
Nice job Larston, did you buy the flare fittings from NAPA as well??

Larston
05-16-2006, 10:34 AM
Nice job Larston, did you buy the flare fittings from NAPA as well??
When you buy the premade repair line, it will come with two fittings already installed on the pipe. Napa and Carquest will have brake fittings and unions available. I'm not sure if Autozone and others like them will have fittings or not.

If you need to do bigger jobs, you can buy brake line in bulk with separate fittings.

reptillikus
05-16-2006, 10:38 AM
Autozone will, so will Napa & Pepboys.

FL78Bronco
05-16-2006, 11:17 AM
I want to install an F350 Brake booster/MC upgrade to my 78 Bronco, which will require me to change the line nut fittings on the front brake lines and double flare them in the process. Can this be done without removing the brake lines? What i mean is... if i take the old Booster/mc out, can i replace the nut and double flare the line without removing the front brake line from the truck or is it easy to remove this line to do it and then re-install it?
Thanks

Larston
05-16-2006, 11:53 AM
I want to install an F350 Brake booster/MC upgrade to my 78 Bronco, which will require me to change the line nut fittings on the front brake lines and double flare them in the process. Can this be done without removing the brake lines? What i mean is... if i take the old Booster/mc out, can i replace the nut and double flare the line without removing the front brake line from the truck or is it easy to remove this line to do it and then re-install it?
Thanks
I have no problem replacing the fitting in the truck. You just have to be careful not to bend the line while you're making the new flare. The pics above were taken above the rear axle of an unlifted Jeep CJ5. There's a lot more room under the hood of a Bronco :toothless

MikE2
05-16-2006, 05:40 PM
I'd be a little cautious of a kit that couldn't do what mine does: perform the flare on a straight cut end. I've used kits from all the big tool manufacturers and they worked without having to doctor the tube. Not sure why your's was different, but it would be worth digging into a bit. I suspect the anvils may not have been as good as they could be.
Just using the roller type tubing cutter bevels the line enoufgh for it to flare correctly. You will see even with your kit, if the line was cut off straight, like with a saw and filed smooth, it wouldn't make the first flare right. If your using some very soft tubing, like copper or aluminum you have to file the bevel at about 45" otherwise instead of putting the first flare in the line it just comprersses it flat.

Larston
05-16-2006, 06:52 PM
Good to know, I've never run across that.

81Bronk36
05-17-2006, 07:21 PM
Just using the roller type tubing cutter bevels the line enoufgh for it to flare correctly. You will see even with your kit, if the line was cut off straight, like with a saw and filed smooth, it wouldn't make the first flare right. If your using some very soft tubing, like copper or aluminum you have to file the bevel at about 45" otherwise instead of putting the first flare in the line it just comprersses it flat.
Mine was the one they sell at sears (performance tools or something) It was cheap, it said to bevel it in the directions and it didnt work untill I beveled it so it could have been the design of the tool???

jermil01
10-04-2006, 10:19 AM
Larston, any chance you still have the pics for this?

jermil01
11-08-2006, 01:52 PM
I think they were lost the last time Supermotors crashed.

Accessory Man
11-08-2006, 05:07 PM
As long as you have the right tool, it is prettty straight forward, if I can do it, anyone can:thumbup

Accessory Man
11-08-2006, 06:43 PM
I forget the name brand but its from a AC company, got it from the Cornwell guy about a month ago, used it once been sitting in the box since then cost like $100 give or take. I will look for the brand name

96broncoman
01-08-2007, 09:10 AM
a search on google found this (http://www.stu-offroad.com/suspension/flaretool/ft-1.htm), so now I dont need any pictures.

plug ugly
02-14-2007, 02:24 PM
please eliminate chit caht and atta-boys. Keep comments related to tech in this area only.