Powerstroke Swap [Archive] - FSB Forums

: Powerstroke Swap


Maelthra
08-30-2006, 06:41 AM
Now, before you flame me for asking a repeat question, ust read it please.

I'm interested in swapping in a 7.3L Powerstoke into my '80 FSB. Now I'm wondering what kind of work I'd have to do to put the entire Drivetrain, wiring, and fuel system into my Bronco. What would fit, what would need to be fabricated, would the frame hold up to it?

Would it be easier to just cut down the F-250 frame and put my bronco's body on it?

I am well aware this is a huge project, but in the meantime I have a 89 F150 with 33"s to keep me happy.

Now I searched this topic already, and it came up with nothing that provided me with any help.

Or, you could all just call me crazy. :wacko

EDIT: Pud added alot of info, which I'll try to keep up on when he updates it. Here ya go.

lets turn this into the OFFICIAL Powerstroke Swap thread, so we can refer people to this, so we dont have little bits and pieces here and there in different threads since this question has been asked alot lately. Chime in any info you have.

My DD is a 1996 F350 PSD (Powestroke Diesel).
You will definately need a donor truck. Powerstroke 7.3s started mid way through the 1994 model year. 1994 also offered the 7.3.L IDI, and 7.3L Turbo IDI. Here is a link to a site, about 3/4 way down the page it starts describing how the PSD injection system works, read this to fully understand what you will need for your fuel system. http://pages.prodigy.net/stevebaz/_i...az/index3.html

anytime there was a comparison, it was between my 1990 bronco(m5rod), 1990 f150(m5rod), and 1996 f350 PSD(zf5).

ENGINE BAY:
To do the swap you MAY be able to use your stock engine x-member, with some fabbing. The PSD engine mounts sit flush atop the face of the X-member. The BKO x-member has a large hole on the drivers side for clearance of the 302/351w oil filter. You may or may not be able to get the PSD perch over this hole, to attatch the mount to. If not youll need the PSD engine x-member. The pass sides are exactly the same between all my vehicles.
The PSD rad is huge, the radiator core support is different than a gas rig. If you buy a PSD donor truck it will have the 92-96/7 front end. If you have an older style, upgrade the whole front clip so you can use the proper rad support for the large diesel rad.

TRANNY/T-case:
The automatic version was the E4OD, diesel rated version. The manual is a zf-5 5speed, diesel rated version as well. My PSD is a zf5, the tranny x-member is different, on the drivers side it drops lower down for clearance of the D-shaft, and attatches to the outter face of the frame. The t-case is a BW 1345

SUSPENSION/AXLES:
all the info for suspension fabbing can be found in the SAS forum.
The 7.3L PSD engine weighs in excess of 1000lbs. You need some springs for under a diesel engine plain and simple. You have 2 options, both require an extent of fabrication. Either way, putting a solid axle up front will be the best bet, and since youre going solid axle go right for the D60. Options:
1) Leaf springs, the bronco never came with them, youll need to need to fab up the hanger mounts on the frame for the leaf pack to attatch.
2) Coil sprung, the D60 never came coil sprung, youll need to fab up the bottom coil buckets

the f250 TTB doesnt work in a 1/2 ton chassis truck, therefore would need fabbing to work, and any fabrication should be spent to do the job right, with a dana60 straight axle. Technically speaking, you 'could' use the stock bronco TTB with some 2wd f250/f350 PSD coils, IF you like chewing through tires and breaking axles, and crown/pinions everytime you put it in 4wd. As I said the PSD is not only more power, but twice as heavy.
-For the rear-
an 8.8 or 9" wont cut it, youll need a sterling 10.25/10.5 or Dana 60/70

FUEL SYSTEM:
IDFK! read the link and reasearch anything left unclear via the intraweb! Or try the 94.5-97 Powerstroke section on Ford-trucks.com

I hit writers block, thats all for now.
-Al

fairlane_68
08-30-2006, 08:49 AM
Actually...it's easier that you think. All you really need is a clean donor truck. 94-97 7.3L DIT 250's and 350's are what you need. You will need custom driveshafts, obviously 3/4 to 1-ton axles, and the springs off the donor may work, depending on the suspension you want. You can get away with a Dana 44. You will have to lift it, though, but I don't remember why.

I have seen professionally built 7.3L Broncos, there's two in Eastern North Carolina that I know of, and they even look factory. The biggest headache you might run into might be withthe fuel tank and fuel pump. I don't think the diesel pump will fit the gas tank.

Good luck, and let me know if you have any good body parts on the donor truck!

Dustin
08-30-2006, 10:55 AM
your biggest problem will be getitng it to work with your era of body. havine a 92-96 bronco would make life alot easier since thats more than likely the doner and era of engine you will be getting. Im should fit in the engine bay in theory. you might run into problems with turbo to firewall clearance.

your suspension needs careful thought. a 1/2 ton bronco want care for a heavy ass PSD on it.

adrianspeeder
08-30-2006, 12:41 PM
Search for Agnems 7.3IDI swap.

Adrianspeeder

96broncoman
08-30-2006, 01:38 PM
look at the suspension/frame strength type stuff. i would think putting the bronco body on the f 250 frame would be easier. thats just me thinkin.

pud
08-30-2006, 04:22 PM
lets turn this into the OFFICIAL Powerstroke Swap thread, so we can refer people to this, so we dont have little bits and pieces here and there in different threads since this question has been asked alot lately. Chime in any info you have.

My DD is a 1996 F350 PSD (Powestroke Diesel).
You will definately need a donor truck. Powerstroke 7.3s started mid way through the 1994 model year. 1994 also offered the 7.3.L IDI, and 7.3L Turbo IDI. Here is a link to a site, about 3/4 way down the page it starts describing how the PSD injection system works, read this to fully understand what you will need for your fuel system. http://pages.prodigy.net/stevebaz/_import/pages.prodigy.net/stevebaz/index3.html

anytime there was a comparison, it was between my 1990 bronco(m5rod), 1990 f150(m5rod), and 1996 f350 PSD(zf5).

ENGINE BAY:
To do the swap you MAY be able to use your stock engine x-member, with some fabbing. The PSD engine mounts sit flush atop the face of the X-member. The BKO x-member has a large hole on the drivers side for clearance of the 302/351w oil filter. You may or may not be able to get the PSD perch over this hole, to attatch the mount to. If not youll need the PSD engine x-member. The pass sides are exactly the same between all my vehicles.
The PSD rad is huge, the radiator core support is different than a gas rig. If you buy a PSD donor truck it will have the 92-96/7 front end. If you have an older style, upgrade the whole front clip so you can use the proper rad support for the large diesel rad.

TRANNY/T-case:
The automatic version was the E4OD, diesel rated version. The manual is a zf-5 5speed, diesel rated version as well. My PSD is a zf5, the tranny x-member is different, on the drivers side it drops lower down for clearance of the D-shaft, and attatches to the outter face of the frame. The t-case is a BW 1345

SUSPENSION/AXLES:
all the info for suspension fabbing can be found in the SAS forum.
The 7.3L PSD engine weighs in excess of 1000lbs. You need some springs for under a diesel engine plain and simple. You have 2 options, both require an extent of fabrication. Either way, putting a solid axle up front will be the best bet, and since youre going solid axle go right for the D60. Options:
1) Leaf springs, the bronco never came with them, youll need to need to fab up the hanger mounts on the frame for the leaf pack to attatch.
2) Coil sprung, the D60 never came coil sprung, youll need to fab up the bottom coil buckets

the f250 TTB doesnt work in a 1/2 ton chassis truck, therefore would need fabbing to work, and any fabrication should be spent to do the job right, with a dana60 straight axle. Technically speaking, you 'could' use the stock bronco TTB with some 2wd f250/f350 PSD coils, IF you like chewing through tires and breaking axles, and crown/pinions everytime you put it in 4wd. As I said the PSD is not only more power, but twice as heavy.
-For the rear-
an 8.8 or 9" wont cut it, youll need a sterling 10.25/10.5 or Dana 60/70

FUEL SYSTEM:
IDFK! read the link and reasearch anything left unclear via the intraweb! Or try the 94.5-97 Powerstroke section on Ford-trucks.com

I hit writers block, thats all for now.
-Al

pud
08-30-2006, 05:07 PM
added info in 'Engine bay' re: rad core support

Maelthra
08-30-2006, 06:04 PM
Thanks alot pud. I've added that into the first post, so just post any updates.

pud
08-30-2006, 07:12 PM
added the link I forgot to put in :banghead

Maelthra
08-31-2006, 09:49 PM
Hey Pud, you know if a Heavy Duty 460 Rad or an older-style diesel rad will be sufficient to cool down the PS?

pud
08-31-2006, 11:04 PM
possibly..I dont know for sure. Im not sure if the older style IDI rad is any different then the PSD rad either. The 460 is bigger than the 7.3L (444), and gasoline engines run hotter than diesels do...

bronco1
09-01-2006, 01:35 AM
The power stroke used a rad very similar to the IDI diesel(heavy duty cooling) from 1984-1994,so you can use a rad support from a 1984-1986 diesel powered truck with heavy duty cooling(narrower,but taller rad than the standard cooling rad) in your 1980 Bronco and use a rad from a 1992-1995 truck with a powerstoke engine.Must be a copper cored rad-not the aluminum cored rad.To use an aluminum cored rad you will have to use the 1996-1997 rad support with a 1992-1997 front clip.A rad from a 460 will not cool a powerstoke engine.

buckin88
09-01-2006, 02:11 AM
possibly..I dont know for sure. Im not sure if the older style IDI rad is any different then the PSD rad either. The 460 is bigger than the 7.3L (444), and gasoline engines run hotter than diesels do...


I would think A diesel would run hotter with almost 16-1 compresion. and diesel burns at higher temp.

pud
09-01-2006, 04:13 AM
17.5:1 for the PSD, and 21.5:1 for the IDI....Im pretty sure they dont run hotter, Im not positive tho. Its just what Ive always heard, and I have a temp guage that reads degrees.

buckin88
09-01-2006, 02:28 PM
17.5:1 for the PSD, and 21.5:1 for the IDI....Im pretty sure they dont run hotter, Im not positive tho. Its just what Ive always heard, and I have a temp guage that reads degrees.


So what do you think runs hotter? what is a IDI

pud
09-01-2006, 03:50 PM
IDI-all 6.9L and 7.3L non Powerstroke diesel engines. Stands for InDirect Injection. Powerstrokes are Direct Injection (DI). Im not a diesel engine pro, but I know the IDI's were a mechanical injection, whereas the the DI powerstrokes were electronic.

and I DONThave a temp guage that reads degrees.
fixed that.
Im pretty sure diesels run cooler, but I should not be quoted on that matter.

buckin88
09-01-2006, 08:49 PM
I think diesels run hotter, and i dont think any gas engine has a exhaust temp of 600 deg. But i might be wrong sit and think about it diesel does not burn at same temp as gas does. The engine has 16+ to 1 compression, no 460 runs that stock.

pud
09-01-2006, 09:19 PM
yeah, now that you mention EGT's...diesels start getting into trouble around 1200*...and I have to agree that diesels run hotter.

Seth
09-01-2006, 09:25 PM
i dont think its so much about what temp a gas or diesel runs at - its more about how much heat the rad is having to shed to get to that temp. i think the diesel produces more heat

MANNY
09-01-2006, 09:34 PM
IDI-all 6.9L and 7.3L non Powerstroke diesel engines. Stands for InDirect Injection. Powerstrokes are Direct Injection (DI). Im not a diesel engine pro, but I know the IDI's were a mechanical injection, whereas the the DI powerstrokes were electronic.


fixed that.
Im pretty sure diesels run cooler, but I should not be quoted on that matter.

Let the diesel mechanic back ya. Your right diesels can run cooler unless they get under high loads then they run hot. The fuel on a diesel at idle and low loads the mixture is real lean thus they don't get real hot when you start throwing more fuel at the you have more heat. Idi and psd rads were near alike.

Again right on the injection Idi's used a stanadyne db2 injection pump, and spray nozzles in precup cylinder heads. Whereas powestrokes used a huei injection system with open combustion cylinder heads. Idi's can be somewhat limited but since we are talking a bronco not a class 7 truck here i would choose an IDi engine i've ponedered it before i built me 302.

Specs

Idi no turbo
185 hp
352 ft-lbs
Idi turbo
195 hp
395 ft-lbs
psd
205-230hp
425-500ft-lbs.

I would say run a idi non turbo for better clearance, and simplicicty with suttle mods you could acheve 220 horses, and 380 ft-lbs which would be a true grunter in a bronco.

Maelthra
09-01-2006, 11:03 PM
So you're saying an IDI Diesel without a turbocharger would fit better? 6.9 or 7.3 L version? What kind of mods am I looking at to get the kind of Horses and Torque that a PowerStroke puts out? Or even the 220/380 that you're talking about?

adrianspeeder
09-01-2006, 11:43 PM
It will "fit" the same, just has much simplier wiring.

Link to Agnems diesel swap.

http://fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=48917

Also, a diesel has a huge amount of coolent compared to a gasser. I think 32 quarts if i remember right for the PSD.

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 12:07 AM
Hmm. How is the Turbo IDIs wiring more complicated? I didn't think a Turbo had more wires atached to it. :duh

MANNY
09-02-2006, 12:09 AM
Yes i'm saying the idi is much simpler to wire especially in the older truck. The turbo is an option for sure just takes up space, and you'll need to really insulate the firewall to prevent warm tootsies. I would most definately say the 7.3l they can be easier to find, work well with a c-6, and after all make more power than the 7.3. To mod it i would first open up the exhaust with some 3.5 inch pipe. Most sefinately get an easier breathing air filter. Then change out the spray nozzles for high flow, and work some tricks with the pump. I usually set the fuel settings up to turbo engine specs then change the pump timing, and take out two governer flyweights to make it rev faster that way it winds up like a gas engine. Hits a little harder. From there you can choose to swap the cam if you want, a gear set for the cam means you could just advance the cam timing, and leave the stocker and not swap the cam. If you didn't worry with the cam you'd be well towards the mark i set.

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 12:15 AM
You'll have to explain some things to me, I'm new to Modding Diesels:

Governer Flyweights? Do you mean weights on the flywheel or something like that?

how would you change the Fuel filter specs and timing? I'd like to know what I'm getting in to before I start looking for a F350 to tear apart.

I've also been told that IDIs have a problem with corroding from the inside out. Is this true, and if so is it as drastic as my friend says?

78CERBERUS
09-02-2006, 12:29 AM
Smells like veggie.....

MANNY
09-02-2006, 12:30 AM
You'll have to explain some things to me, I'm new to Modding Diesels:

Governer Flyweights? Do you mean weights on the flywheel or something like that?

how would you change the Fuel filter specs and timing? I'd like to know what I'm getting in to before I start looking for a F350 to tear apart.

I've also been told that IDIs have a problem with corroding from the inside out. Is this true, and if so is it as drastic as my friend says?


Is he referring to the cooling system?? Yeah diesel sooling systems sometimes can cavitate the cylinder walls (IF YOU DON"T TAKE CARE OF IT) solution run a good low or now silicate antifreeze, and keep the system clean you may even install a coolant conditioner.

The governer flyweights are inside the injection pump a db2 has 6 flyweights that control how fuel is applied. Now what happens is you push on go pedal tension on the springs that hold the flyweights in is less so fuel is applied then engine revs up flyweight sling out like a mechanical advance in a cars distributer then they lessen the fuel to keep the engine from overrevving. Get it??

Now fuel settings are controlled by screw inside the pump if you have a good working pump you can tweak by 16th's of a turn, and such. However if you tear the pump down it's a good idea to run it on a flow bench to calibrate it so that each cylinder gets even fuel. I'm use to building the pump then running it on a pump dyno. Or having somebody dial it in after i set the fuel specs. Timing is set with the mounting into the timing case like a distibuter on a car. however you need an inductive pickup snap-on sells or several others that clips on the number on injector line to power your timing light the you set it up like a gas burner.

Here is the pump.
http://www.stanadyne.com/new/ppt/ppt_db2.asp

MikE2
09-02-2006, 12:32 AM
The C6 works like shit behind a 7.3
I had one for a while and swapped a 5 speed in when I couldn't take the slippage no longer. Just doing that gave the truck much more power

MANNY
09-02-2006, 12:37 AM
The C6 works like shit behind a 7.3
I had one for a while and swapped a 5 speed in when I couldn't take the slippage no longer. Just doing that gave the truck much more power


I've seen them do fine now yeah they kinda need to be tuned up as the power goes up as anything a stocker won't hold 550 ft-lbs but if built to match the motor it'll work. However i also understand the side of putting a crunch box behind it heck my current bronco is the first truck i;ve ever owned with a auto in it. Personal preference on what he wants:thumbup

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 12:38 AM
I think I sorta get it. Seems like a lot of work to make it as strong as a Powerstroke.

MANNY
09-02-2006, 12:42 AM
I think I sorta get it. Seems like a lot of work to make it as strong as a Powerstroke.

They are actually easier to dial up than a powerstroke and cheaper to tinker on just your somewhat limited by idi, and no turbo. Now a turbo would be a quicky for big horse bump banks old sidewinder that they still sell boosts it from stock to like 240, and 500 ft-lbs. But thats like 3,000 semolions:banghead

MikE2
09-02-2006, 12:47 AM
I've seen them do fine now yeah they kinda need to be tuned up as the power goes up as anything a stocker won't hold 550 ft-lbs but if built to match the motor it'll work. However i also understand the side of putting a crunch box behind it heck my current bronco is the first truck i;ve ever owned with a auto in it. Personal preference on what he wants:thumbup
Its not that. The problem with the C6 is its not able to transfer the torque at low RPM's where the diesel makes it at.

MANNY
09-02-2006, 12:51 AM
Its not that. The problem with the C6 is its not able to transfer the torque at low RPM's where the diesel makes it at.

Yeah i follow not enough line pressure you need to get the pump pressure up real high to keep the clutches hooked. and it being a gear pump you often need rpms to build pressure. That would be call for just maxing the modulator out, and blue printing the pump. I know that is what swamps diesel did to several

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 12:52 AM
Ok, let me explain what I'm thinking about doing:

If I'm going to put a diesel in my Bronco, It's going to get 1-ton drivetrain, too. D60, Sterling rear, whatever the Powerstrokes came with. So it would be a case of taking the entire drivetrain, wiring, engine, the whole shabang and putting it on/under my Bronc. So for the time and effort involved, why not just start with an engine that makes 450ft/lbs of torque instead of a $3000 turbo kit from Banks. If It means custom-building a rad support to keep my front end, I'm up for that. That way, I dont have to tweak the fuel system, or have to worry about cavitation problems. (I doubt I'll have them, but just to be safe)

Why I want a diesel is Torque. I'd like to be able to pull my dad's trailer, or haul other people out of the mud, whatever I come across. Either way I do a diesel, either an IDI or a Powerstroke, It's going to be fairly expensive (At least $3000 anyway, I figure) and going to take me a while. So if I can put a more powerful engine in, why shouldn't I?

MikE2
09-02-2006, 12:57 AM
If your stuck on one of the Ford engines I would say **** the PSD and go with a 7.3, or even a 6.9 liter. Much easier to put in, easier to work on, and they can make awesome power. Here is a 7.3 lite I put in my 89 F350, with an ATS turbo on it and a Hypermax injection pump, and swirl polished valves. I was told by Hypermax it would be about 300-330 HP, and I believed evey bit of it. If I put an aftercooler on there to lower the boost for those 21.5:1 pistons it would have been even better. Or if I took advantage of the denser air and kept the boost at the same lever I could have been closer to 400 HP. That thing ran great, ran better than the 6.0 PSD did when it was stock and had a much broader torque curve.


The picture is clear as mud, and theres really no reason I even need to post it other than I just wanted to show my beefy mains off
http://www.supermotors.net/getfile/197378/fullsize/000_0301.jpg







And don't rule out doing a 5.9 Cummins swap. If you can get a tranny and T-case you would be much better off going that way.

MANNY
09-02-2006, 12:58 AM
Yeah i get it you need to find a wrecked truck. Main advantage to the idi is the fact of simplicity no ecm and etcetra like we stated above. Yes power is not the same however we are talking a bronco not a school bus (idi's powered them too just with high fuel settings) If you want the power rock on just be prepared for some more hassles.

Cavitation is not idi specific though all diesels remember all of them.

Now all i'm stating is what i would do and offering my knowledge due from experience. However key rule here is this is your truck. In the end one person has to be happy with it YOU and that's all that matters.:rockon

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 12:59 AM
If your stuck on one of the Ford engines I would say **** the PSD and go with a 7.3, or even a 6.9 liter. Much easier to put in, easier to work on, and they can make awesome power. Here is a 7.3 lite I put in my 89 F350, with an ATS turbo on it and a Hypermax injection pump, and swirl polished valves. I was told by Hypermax it would be about 300-330 HP, and I believed evey bit of it. If I put an aftercooler on there to lower the boost for those 21.5:1 pistons it would have been even better. Or if I took advantage of the denser air and kept the boost at the same lever I could have been closer to 400 HP. That thing ran great, ran better than the 6.0 PSD did when it was stock and had a much broader torque curve.


Yeah, you put a bunch of money into that engine. I want to keep my engine stock as possible, to retain reliability. (If there is any to begin with)

78CERBERUS
09-02-2006, 01:01 AM
Its not that. The problem with the C6 is its not able to transfer the torque at low RPM's where the diesel makes it at.

please explaine the gas vs deisel thing.......i dont know of a transmission made that beats the C-6 (automatic) as slow as it is ?

78CERBERUS
09-02-2006, 01:04 AM
The C6 works like shit behind a 7.3
I had one for a while and swapped a 5 speed in when I couldn't take the slippage no longer. Just doing that gave the truck much more power

are you the deisel guy..not being wise .........need information.....

MANNY
09-02-2006, 01:04 AM
please explaine the gas vs deisel thing.......i dont know of a transmission made that beats the C-6 (automatic) as slow as it is ?

Just the c-6 wasen't designed necesarrily to be behind a torque monster like a diesel

MANNY
09-02-2006, 01:05 AM
If your stuck on one of the Ford engines I would say **** the PSD and go with a 7.3, or even a 6.9 liter. Much easier to put in, easier to work on, and they can make awesome power. Here is a 7.3 lite I put in my 89 F350, with an ATS turbo on it and a Hypermax injection pump, and swirl polished valves. I was told by Hypermax it would be about 300-330 HP, and I believed evey bit of it. If I put an aftercooler on there to lower the boost for those 21.5:1 pistons it would have been even better. Or if I took advantage of the denser air and kept the boost at the same lever I could have been closer to 400 HP. That thing ran great, ran better than the 6.0 PSD did when it was stock and had a much broader torque curve.


The picture is clear as mud, and theres really no reason I even need to post it other than I just wanted to show my beefy mains off
http://www.supermotors.net/getfile/197378/fullsize/000_0301.jpg







And don't rule out doing a 5.9 Cummins swap. If you can get a tranny and T-case you would be much better off going that way.

Man mike i didnt' knwo you had done all that stuff to your truck nice me likey:thumbup

Here is the idi i built the other week.


I know not a international
http://www.supermotors.net/getfile/287766/thumbnail/d342-cranking-006.mpg (http://www.supermotors.net/vehicles/registry/media/287766)

MikE2
09-02-2006, 01:24 AM
Yeah, you put a bunch of money into that engine. I want to keep my engine stock as possible, to retain reliability. (If there is any to begin with) You won't have any reliability problems with putting a turbo on it. If you don't have/don't want to put the money in it, then thats a different story

please explaine the gas vs deisel thing.......i dont know of a transmission made that beats the C-6 (automatic) as slow as it is ?The diesel peaks its power at like 1500 RPM's, and it puls very hard from 1200 and will even pull very good at an idle (I have done idling brakestands with a dually in 1st gear) At those RPM's where the diesel is making its power at the transmission is not able to effectivley transfer that power to the rear axle. This is why with the older diesels (before everyone came out with their new transmissions (4R100, 5R110...ect) the trucks with teh manual transmissions has SOOOO much more power and up hill pulling power. The truck this is MOST noticable in is any older Doidge with the 5.9 and an automatic. The 5.9 is an even lower RPM engine than the Ford diesels are. Sometimes with a heavy load on a hill (especially in reverse) you have to put the T case in low range to get it moving. Seriously.

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 01:34 AM
Yeah, I'm kinda short on cash, thats why I want to know all the details before I get too far in. Thats also why I want a stock engine to put in.

I'm starting to consider a cummins as an alternative,because the 89 B series is brutal simple to use. Three wires.:twak But it's really heavy.

MikE2
09-02-2006, 02:26 AM
I don't think it weighs any more than the 7.3 does. I have pulled two 5.9's and they didn't seem any heavier or lighter than teh V8.One was in my 93 Dodge, and another was on a friends 95

What do you mean by "short on cash"? I wouldn't even attempt it unless really have all the money you would need to get it in there and running

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 02:31 AM
I mean short on cash like I'm working minimum wage and I'm going back to school.

And the 5.9L that I would get would be out of a 89 Dodge, which my ffriend owns one. And he says it weights nearly 2000lbs.

MikE2
09-02-2006, 03:24 AM
They ain't that heavy. More like 1000 pounds complete and running. If I were you I would put off doing this untill you get out of school, unless you got something else to drive and the truck can sit up on blocks for as year as you get money

pud
09-02-2006, 03:49 AM
that would be the wise thing to do.

adrianspeeder
09-02-2006, 01:33 PM
And the 5.9L that I would get would be out of a 89 Dodge, which my ffriend owns one. And he says it weights nearly 2000lbs.

Nooooo, I remember reading it's only a bit heavier than a PSD.

Hmm. How is the Turbo IDIs wiring more complicated? I didn't think a Turbo had more wires atached to it. :duh

Doh! sorry, I missread and thought you were comparing an IDI to a PSD. :whiteflag

Adrianspeeder

Maelthra
09-02-2006, 09:25 PM
Yeah, I assumed that a PSD was more complicated than a IDI, just because it came in out 94.

If I was to tackle this project, I would first get a 89 F150 that I've bee looking at for $500.

MANNY
09-03-2006, 02:12 AM
Yeah, I assumed that a PSD was more complicated than a IDI, just because it came in out 94.

If I was to tackle this project, I would first get a 89 F150 that I've bee looking at for $500.


Hey i like 89 f150's my old one sadly totaled out now.
http://www.supermotors.net/getfile/274271/fullsize/mvc-002s.jpg

Maelthra
09-03-2006, 10:23 PM
Yeah, I havn't seen this F150 yet. I'm assuming that when he said it didn't pass inspection, he ment AirCare.

I sure hope it's only AirCare. :/

capisbak
10-26-2006, 08:24 PM
I have a question. I have an atlas 2 T-Case and it is fairly new. Im thinking about doing the new 6.0L PSD swap in my bronco but I dont want to get rid of my Atlas. what can I do about this. I will be using the 5 speed out of an 05' F-250.

Maelthra
03-26-2007, 01:49 AM
Sorry, never really looked back on this thread:

Ford T-cases all have the same Bolt pattern, I've been told. That means that you can keep the Atlas because it has the same pattern as the orginal T-case.

B-Rads B-Ronk
03-26-2007, 02:40 AM
With all the problems that the 6.0 has why would you wanna swap it in? I am not saying the 6.0 is trash but it is just known to have many problems, but it would be a badass conversion. I have thought about swapping a 5.9 Cummins in an F-150, but with the POS low sulfer fuel we all have to deal with I dont think that will be happening. This new diesel fuel has been playin havoc on most all older diesels, including 6.9, 7.3, 6.0, and the 5.9 Cummins 12 valve. I just dont wanna pay out the ass for injectors, glow plugs, glow plug relays and the stupid high price for fuel. Sorry, I love diesels, in fact I am going through diesel school and love them but in todays world unless your towing a ton of weight I dont think that I would do it. But thats just me and my two cents.

MikE2
03-26-2007, 02:46 AM
With all the problems that the 6.0 has why would you wanna swap it in?
Because its a hot rod of a diesel with a very gasoline engine like powerband and redline. Its problems are pretty much worked out anyways.
I wouldn't do it though because your not going to find anyone giving one away, and you're going to need a case of Tylenol for all the instalation headaches

sewiv
03-26-2007, 03:53 AM
If anyone is looking to do a diesel swap in Michigan, this might be helpful.

http://annarbor.craigslist.org/pts/292942132.html

/==0=\
03-26-2007, 05:44 PM
I wouldn't image it being too difficult with a donor truck. The nice thing with a PSD is that all your accesories and brackets and what not come out with the motor. Just get a donor truck and swap the whole package in, front clip and all.

d-selpowereddiebauer
09-14-2009, 06:44 AM
This thread is useless...lol...

seawalkersee
09-14-2009, 11:32 AM
I see you have been hitting all of the diesel threads. Step over to oilburners.net and do some research there.

SWS

Jmackk
12-19-2009, 06:42 PM
Why dont you just get a donor truck and shorten the frame and drop the Bronco body on it, you would be miles and miles ahead, thats what Im getting ready to do. You dont have to worry about swaping engine's and "making things fit". It would also get done a lot quicker and probably get done a lot cheaper, really for the cost of a donor truck. AND, with the money that you save you could even do things like maybe replace heads gaskets, or radiator hoses ect. just to help with reliability so you dont have to worry about it latter.