Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner
1 - 20 of 87 Posts

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
1356 swap/refresh info:
4/15/06
Shadofax (The Juice)


There are lots of resources to review if you are looking for info. about the 1356 (electric or manual shift) or even the BW1345, so here are a few links right off the bat. I did most of my research from these links, as well as searching FSB (OF COURSE!) for prior rebuild threads (you should find several good ones with pics):

http://web.archive.org/web/20101224141021/http://www.broncolinks.com/index.php?index=70
miesk5 1356 links
¤
http://web.archive.org/web/20050224100710/http://www.medicine.wisc.edu/~mrm/bronco/1356shaft/
1356 Output Shaft Conversion
¤

See http://tbtrans.com/transfer_case.htm#ford_parts
Transfer case parts
¤
See http://www.fourwheeler.com/projectbuild/129_0406_red
1356 Manual Shift Rebuild in a 92 F150 (Project Fiery Redhead)
Source: by Ken B at Four Wheeler Magazine fourwheeler.com
¤
https://www.sonnax.com
Parts
¤
In the end, much of the info/added pics that were useful to me are combined at my supermotors site, so many pics not shown in this write-up can be found here:

http://www.supermotors.org/vehicles/registry/detail.php?id=628&s=30964#content

Here’s the basic premise of this write-up….got an electric BorgWarner 1356 transfer case causing you problems? Doesn’t matter if you think the problem is internal or external of the case. By swapping to a manual, all electrical problems can be eliminated. This leads to refreshing or rebuilding the manual 1356 case internals that you score for the swap, unless of course you buy one rebuilt or new (ebay has them rebuilt all the time, but they are still about $500). If you find a used one in good condition like I did, a rebuild and a fabulous learning experience can be yours for perhaps $120-350 depending on how much is needing replacement.


Rebuilding/refreshing a manual 1356 Transfer case
So let’s get started. Assuming you are wishing to convert from electric to manual, you need a donor. This is not absolute, but just about any Bronco, F150/250/350 between 1987-1996 will likely contain either an electric or manual 1356. I think it was even used in trucks a year or two after, then the BW4407 starts coming into play, and I know little about it. My manual case came from a ’95 Bronco just like mine, and the unit only had 80k to begin with. This is important since if the unit was even semi cared for, newer years/lesser miles will affect your parts total related to the refresh or worst case scenario, rebuild. It should also be noted that again a unit from a Bronco is easier since it already has the flange style rear output, whereas the trucks will have slip yoke and require additional parts with the flange, and proper output “nose” (the internal shaft is also different in length, and from what I have seen it also appears you would need to swap this too). In my case, since the unit was cared for, my write-up is more of a clean/refresh since I did not need to buy a new chain or new bearing kit.

Before unbuttoning the case, I want to go ahead and list out potential refresh/rebuild items. Here are the items I purchased (again look to the sources above on where to get the stuff):
Seal Kit (Don’t buy the Jeff’s Bronco Graveyard one. It’s actually meant for a Truck as it has only 3 large input/output seals, and one is for the slip yoke style rear output, so you end up having to get one more seal that will work with the Bronco Flange rear output. All three large seals for the input and front and rear outputs are the exact same on the Bronco.
Oil pump kit (this kit also included new shift fork pads).

That’s all I needed. You’ll need to look at your chain for slop, look at the forks for wear, look at the sprockets for wear, look at the planetary for wear/slop, from the 5th link above, check and see what kind of play you have in the shift lever that goes into the case (push/pull it). Too much play here will allow the shift fork to come out of the track within the case, causing a lot of problems with engagement/disengagement. A bearing kit is also a wise idea with higher mileage/fluid-abused Tcases.

Beyond this, there is one area that ALL cases broken into should have addressed, and that is wear at the case walls enclosing the oil pump locating arm. But first let’s break the case halves apart and do a quick tear down:

• Drain fluid, if not done already.
• Remove Front & Rear Yoke/Flange bolts. Torque on these is about 150ft lbs. so you’ll need to hold the case and use a big extension for leverage. The socket is a 1 ¼” 12pnt. I’ve heard that thick wall sockets don’t fit. Also note the washer and seal for reinstallation (new seals are included in the seal kit).
• Remove the 4 Torx bolts holding the rear tail shaft on. Remove the large C clip on the shaft. Note: All my torx case bolts (these 4 + the case bolts described next), once removed, had lots of magnesium shavings in the bolt holes. Messy when trying to keep things clean. Clean out the bolt holes before getting real clean with the case internals, and really, clean the case externally to save yourself some headache later.
• Remove all the torx case bolts, and carefully separate the case halves. Note: there is a locating pin at each end, and notate the location of the spring for the shift fork within:


• Everything can now be viewed. To pull the chain, sprockets, shift fork arm, etc. there are three more C clips (do not get all these C clips mixed up, and do not damage them as most kits do not supply you with new ones). Of the three, 1 is over on the output to the front driveshaft along with a little washer, 1 is holding the rear output shaft sprocket/shift fork stuff on, and there is 1 final clip (very large) at the front of the Tcase inside the input shaft area (behind the seal). Removing this final one also will allow the whole planetary to slide out the back:






• The seals can be removed easily with a puller, shown in this pic (it's upper right in the pic just below the blue shop towels black handle, red grip, pic looking thing), along with other useful tools (a couple good screwdrivers and a pair of retaining ring pliers is mandatory). Do not damage the Tcase seal surfaces while trying to remove (thus the need to use a proper seal puller):



Ok, now that the case is apart, and you’ve got an idea of how it all goes together (it really is pretty simple inside), it’s time now to address the Oil Pump kit, the fix for the Oil pump locating arm, the shift fork pads, and now of course is when you’d put your new chain in, and any other rebuild parts I did not have to do (only other real items to consider here at this time would be pulling the old bearings and replacing, and planetary).

• Oil pump kit and the locator arm fix:






Oil pump kit reassembly should involve loctite red for the 4 bolts.

• The shift fork pads (these were part of my seal kit):


• Reassembly:
Reassemble parts as you took them off, again once you’ve studied the internals it’s not difficult.
Cleaning of case halves critical to reassembly, focus especially on a nice clean/smooth surface all around where the case halves meet.
Get about 4 cans of brake cleaner. Bearings (new ones or original) are critical not to have crud in them.
Be very careful how much and where the RTV goes on during reassembly of case halves. Too much RTV could ooze inside, come off and clog the oil pickup.
Be careful not to clog the port let for lubing the rear outlet bearing/Tcase plate that is attached with 4 bolts:



Install of manual case (in place of electric 1356) and external shift linkages:
I’ve done enough gabbering in the prior rebuild/refresh section, so this part is pretty easy with some guiding pictures, mainly to steer you to what you need with all the shift linkage:

• Once I had all the shifter pieces (rod, shifter assembly, bolts to attach to tranny, boot), I installed this first into the truck (see pics below).
• Taking out the electric 1356 requires removing both driveshafts, remove rear Tcase shift motor wiring harness, remove breather.
• You’ll have to support the tranny and drop the cross member, it’s fairly heavy so think this through.
• There are (6) ½” bolts that hold the Tcase to the tranny housing adapter. It will leak just a little once unbolted. There is very little room between the Tcase bolts on the passenger side and the stock exhaust. The bolts are not that tight since it’s all magnesium (torque on these is about 40 lb/ft., they had traces of red locktight on removal, so I used a little on reinstall. NOT the permanent, just red locktight high strength).
• You need a gasket (included in the seal kit, don’t damage it). It takes no sealant. Surfaces must be clean.
• Chock the wheels and place the tranny in Neutral, making install of the slip shaft easier while “clocking” the rebuilt manual Tcase into proper position.

Shifter parts:
E4OD shifter needed (this one came from a ’97 F250 with E4OD). Buying this, or the boot from the dealer is VERY expensive (several hundred total). Used this shifter was $65:


This is a better pic of the backing plate on the shifter:


E4OD boot/plastic piece, again used for $20. dealer wanted $75:


shifter assembly & backing plate ready to go down into the hole (you can see the two bolt holes in the side of the E4OD):


shifter rod & boot being located:


Installed (note that it’s WAY easier to do all this with the seat removed):


Underneath the truck looking rearward the E4OD shifter is kinda blocking the view, but right behind it is the 4WD shifter I just bolted to the tranny, and the linkage going back to the manual Tcase, now installed. Front driveshaft has not been installed yet.
The linkage rod from shifter assembly to the Tcase is specific for the E4OD, and one of the cheaper dealer scores (this way you get new grommets at either end), part #F2TZ-7B051-E, about $10


Interior shot of 4x4 and low range dash lights lit (as are the electric button lights). If you want your lights to work, Ford Part # F6TZ-14K067-AA is the short wiring assembly that goes from the manual tcase switch located on the front of the case just below the breather, over to the harness just above the E4OD tranny (it’s a bit spendy at the dealer, $34). There is a plug there with a cap, and this harness is plug and play. Eventually I will remove the pushbutton switches in the dash and put a blank black insert there ( about the same time I am going in to remove the ABS light which still is glowing on mine, can’t be seen in the pic since the auto shifter is in the way).


Final thoughts
I always thought the Tcase lay dormant until my 4wd was engaged. WRONG. The front driveshaft may not be moving, but the shaft internally connecting tranny to rear driveshaft is still constantly active, as is the planetary. This means that Tcase fluid maintenance is important. Fluid changes, as well as monitoring temps, is important.

Separate note, many folks have trouble with shifting into 4WD either due to lack of understanding of shift pattern and what gear to be in, or due to age of 4WD assembly and looseness (or lack of lubrication) in components such as the shifter linkage assembly (bolted under the truck usually to the tranny or extension). Lack of understanding of shift position leads one to start yanking, which in turn will break or damage the shifter linkage directly underneath, or worse yet, clock the Tcase internal shift arm sideways a little so the fork(s) fall out of position (see spacer recommendation above). Since the install, all has been perfect except that I seem to have tough engagement going from 4wd to Low range. It always sticks in neutral. Instead of trying to jam things, I’m letting the new parts settle in, and I’ve found that turning the truck off makes the shift in/out of low fairly easy (the factory owners manual suggests this).
 

·
negative creep
Joined
·
8,651 Posts
i prefer to shift ranges while moving, like 0-3 mph or so. tranny in neutral, feet off the brakes will let the internals move more freely because there will not be any bind on them.

and yes, those cases are pretty damn simple inside.
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yea Tranny in neutral, I let it roll though at times I am touching the brakes, just very stiff getting past neuaral right now. not a biggy though since I know I will get it into 4 low, unlike my electric which had begun to just do nothing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
29,452 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I wish you had this up last week, but after searching for a couple days I found what I needed. Thanks to all you guys here:thumbup
The only thing I did different was I cleaned and primed the pump tube, just for my own measure. Amazingly the tabs for the pump was in perfect shape(no wear ar all) and the pads also.
One thing I noticed was the shift fork. Is yours plastic? Mine came out of a F350 and it has a metal one. Also on the Bronco models, does it have an access panel for the p.t.o. drive? Mine did, so I removed it,cleaned and reinstalled. Since I have a F150, I didn't have to change the slip yoke.

And again, thank you for all the input and good reading:popc1:
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
vhmsports said:
I wish you had this up last week, but after searching for a couple days I found what I needed. Thanks to all you guys here:thumbup
The only thing I did different was I cleaned and primed the pump tube, just for my own measure. Amazingly the tabs for the pump was in perfect shape(no wear ar all) and the pads also.
One thing I noticed was the shift fork. Is yours plastic? Mine came out of a F350 and it has a metal one. Also on the Bronco models, does it have an access panel for the p.t.o. drive? Mine did, so I removed it,cleaned and reinstalled. Since I have a F150, I didn't have to change the slip yoke.

And again, thank you for all the input and good reading:popc1:
Priming the oil pump tube sounds like a good idea. I had asked if anyone else had bothered to put a little ATF on bearings and other contact areas, no one answered, so I did a little of that, but I like the priming idea.

Yes, both my electric and this manual shift, both from 1995 Bronco's have a plastic shift arm. The arm that slides the fork and gear over to the planetary for low range is the aluminum one. one of the writeups I point to...the F150 in there (a 1992 model) also has the plastic shift arm. No access panel for these units for PTO.

Al, are you clapping because you like the writeup, or because your site got top billing?:beer :thumbup :toothless
 

·
Charlie don't surf..
'92 Ford Bronco XLT
Joined
·
16,204 Posts
Great write up, and nice job on the install..:thumbup :thumbup ..So other than having a bit of a tough time shifting into 4 low, was it worth the time and effort you put into it. Also, how did you what position the transfer case was in when you reassembled it? ie 4 hi, neutral or 4 low?
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
sewiv said:
Great write-up, Shadofax. Very clear pictures, too.

The pump arm mod, is that something you did, or something you bought?
Need a welder for that one. it's something I fabbed, but it's been tried in the past, nothing new, it's just the best way I've ever seen to stop the damage to the locating walls (or at least slow it down to the point of it being no concern for the next 300k):thumbup
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
jermil01 said:
Great write up, and nice job on the install..:thumbup :thumbup ..So other than having a bit of a tough time shifting into 4 low, was it worth the time and effort you put into it. Also, how did you what position the transfer case was in when you reassembled it? ie 4 hi, neutral or 4 low?
Totally worth the effort. 1) I now fully understand the internal workings, 2) I took apart my electric unit yesterday...in about 45 mins it was completely disassembled, so I know these units now, 3) doing it myself saved me a lot of dough, and I trust it was done right vs. buying a rebuilt one on ebay. 4) it was actually fun

as far as T case position when reassembling it's easy....if you play with the arm on the tcase once assembled you will know what position it's in by holding onto the front yoke and rear flange....if they move together you've got 4wheel, if you can spin one you have 2 wheel (unless you have it in N), you can also tell by the revolutions of the input shaft compared to the outputs if you've got it in low. So when I bolted it up I knew it was in 2wd, and of course the shift arm only allowed the shifter to be in the 2WD most forward position when installing the arm. Can't make a mistake here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
556 Posts
what a good job man.
so how is it now? have you tried it out yet? what do you think?

should make that a sticky for sure.

do you have any pics from your welding? that would be a great addition.

cheers
 

·
Support our troops!
Joined
·
153 Posts
Great Job. This is what I will do after rebuilding my spare steering gear box. Coming home from Moab it made a sound like a cat being run through a blender (three times).

I wonder if you can marry a 1356 and a 1345 so I would get PTO? Any thoughts now that you have had one apart?

dc
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Welding, no pics. From my supermotors site I think one of the picture captions mentions taking a piece of 3/16th's mild rod about 1.25 and welding it on the end. I just notched the end so it all fits nice and snug and tacked it in several places.

No need for "marriage" dave, 1356's in the 1 Ton variety often had the PTO.
What do you want the PTO for? I'm not sure I would use it for anything serious. You break the case, you're screwed.
 

·
Support our troops!
Joined
·
153 Posts
I keep thinking that I will go with a hydro winch so this would be a great place to put the pump. Hopefully I can score a hydro brake booster this weekend so my sag pump will be pretty much tapped out.

The 1345 is a slip-yolk unit so I was wondering if I could swap out the slip-shaft rear output of a 1356.

Did you go with a new chain for yours?

But I dig your writeup. Much better than one that was on here showing it done in a GF's shower ;)

dc
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Dangling_Dave said:
I keep thinking that I will go with a hydro winch so this would be a great place to put the pump. Hopefully I can score a hydro brake booster this weekend so my sag pump will be pretty much tapped out.

The 1345 is a slip-yolk unit so I was wondering if I could swap out the slip-shaft rear output of a 1356.

Did you go with a new chain for yours?

But I dig your writeup. Much better than one that was on here showing it done in a GF's shower ;)

dc
If ya want the PTO output and slipshaft, I still think you're ok with a 1356 from an F350 unless I'm not hearing you correctly.

No new chain, my case only had 80k on it, and no signs that the chain had any looseness. This was the same for the planetary and even the bearings. A higher mileage unit I would have probably done the chain and bearings for sure.

Yea, I remember someone showering with his Tcase in the GF's bathtub.
I didn't shower with mine.
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Final wrapup:

The shifting to 4low is now just fine, likely due to a week of driving and letting fluid get all around the Tcase, and use of white lithium on the linkage gate.

no leaks

and pics of the dash fascia removal to pull the ABS bulb and take out the switch and verify my 4x4 and low lights still work after, which they do:

All the stuff pulled:


you need a T20 torx.

dash pulled apart:


dash again:


If you need more dash pics, this white face guage writeup has some good ones on how to get into the dash. It's pretty easy though. just remember you need a T20 torx to remove the 2 screws that are under the little trim pieces on the dash fascia, then the fascia just pops out (there are like 5 other pop type retainers around it). The T20 is also needed for the 4 screws holding the instrument cluster. You do not need to totally remove this cluster if just pulling the ABS bulb. I was able to reach around behind and pull the bulb once the 4 cluster screws were out. This saves the effort of having to remove the shift column fascia in order to get the cluster totally out:
http://fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=61546

electric internals in case you are intersted:


skidplate I fabbed:
 

·
press ALT+F4
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
Good writeup Mark. I did a similar fix to the oil pump flap when I rebuilt a 1356 tcase to put in my 90 f250. I used the middle section of the saddle part of a cheap 2-1/4" muffler clamp; cut it down and welded it to the end of the folded plate. It fits just right.
One small correction though:
The front driveshaft may not be moving, but the shaft internally connecting tranny to rear driveshaft is still constantly active, as is the planetary.
The planetary set is only engaged in low range. That's what the front shift fork does.
 

·
Former owner of Shadofax
Joined
·
17,026 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
78bronco460 said:
Good writeup Mark. I did a similar fix to the oil pump flap when I rebuilt a 1356 tcase to put in my 90 f250. I used the middle section of the saddle part of a cheap 2-1/4" muffler clamp; cut it down and welded it to the end of the folded plate. It fits just right.
One small correction though:
The planetary set is only engaged in low range. That's what the front shift fork does.
Thanks Jim.

On the correction, ya know, you got me thinking on that one......and I have my electric tore down in the garage since I wanted to see what shape it was in and see what parts (such as the planetary) would make good spares. Here's what I am seeing (so I have to disagree)....

The front shift fork does engage low range, however, follow me through the drivetrain on this....the tranny output is male splined and goes into the female snout of the Planetary, it rotates with the tranny. Then you have the short driveshaft within the Tcase, which goes into the planetary and rests in a bronze bushing and needle bearing in there. The front bearing actually is supporting the planetary snout as it constantly rotates. now, the front shift fork you mentioned connects to the planetary via the sliding splined hub. The way it sits it is always connected to the planetary via a 1-1 relationship (planetary turns same speed as driveshaft). This is the inner small splines in the planetary. Moving the fork moves this hub to engage the low range gear reduction within the planetary (a seperate set of teeth that is the outer set of teeth still facing in toward the shaft and splined hub which basically acts as the intermediary between the two), and now the rotations of the planetary and its input snout take apx. 2.5x's (apx.) for 1 revolution of the output shaft. These outer teeth are also much more substantial. In between the two is how you find your T case neutral setting. Regardless of 2:69:1 or 1:1 the planetary unit is receiving the tranny output directly and is turning.


At least that's what I'm seeing.:thumbup


That sliding splined hub is a critical piece in connecting planetary to the shaft output (it's 32 spline sitting on the shaft (inner splines) and 38 outer spline connecting to the planetary). Did you notice yours was 'blued' like it had seen a lot of heat? Every pic of one I've seen they are like this. Was nothing wrong with either of mine tooth wise, so I reused, but these are a part that can be replaced and I've seen a writeup or two recommending this, about $40 I think.

KL's sliding splined hub pic:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,612 Posts
Shadofax -

Found this thread after wanting to know more on how to do an auto xfer case swap to manual xfer case.... nice thread and details.

Quick question though - suppose I have a manual 1356 xfer case and know it's a decent case - do I STILL need to open it up and do anything, or can I just go "plug-n-play" with it after getting the rest of the needed manual xfer case linkage & swap parts needed to do such a mod?

I read through your entire tech and just did not see any mention that if already having a decent case, one could just move forward beyond all of the "rebuild" and go directly to the installation steps...

Also, one more question - if having an auto Bronco xfer case and then going to convert to a Bronco manual xfer case - does one need to do anything with the driveshafts? Meaning, I have a 94 XLT w/ auto 4x4 - I want to go to a manual 4x4 setup and a friend of mine has a good 90 Bronco 1356 manual case - will that case be a direct swap and if so, would I have to do anything with my current driveshafts?

Will the 90 1356 that came from an AOD equipped rig bolt right up into place into a 94 that has an E4OD as long as the user purchases the correct E4OD xfer case linkage/parts?

thanks for any further info or help.
 

·
Charlie don't surf..
'92 Ford Bronco XLT
Joined
·
16,204 Posts
Cobra, all good questions. I did essentially the same rebuild as Shadow, only he finished before I did. Long story short, it can't hurt to open the case up, to at least check the oil pump arm, this is an area prone to failure on these cases. Might want to also check the chain for slack. Outside of that the case is pretty straight forward.

As for the driveshaft, you won't need to do anything, as long as the tcase is a fixed yoke style as is found on the bronco.

With regards to the E40D and the AOD trannies as they relate to the tcase, the AOD tranny used a speedo gear that is housed in the tailshaft housing of the transfer case. The E40d gets is speed off of the speed sensor on the rear diff. What you will want to do is remove the tailshaft housing from your electronic tcase and swap it on to the manual one. The tcase from the AOD will have the provision for the speedo gear, where the E40D tcase will not. Hope that's clear as mud. If not check my thread on the 1356 rebuild and on my supermotors site.:thumbup

Shadofax -

Found this thread after wanting to know more on how to do an auto xfer case swap to manual xfer case.... nice thread and details.

Quick question though - suppose I have a manual 1356 xfer case and know it's a decent case - do I STILL need to open it up and do anything, or can I just go "plug-n-play" with it after getting the rest of the needed manual xfer case linkage & swap parts needed to do such a mod?

I read through your entire tech and just did not see any mention that if already having a decent case, one could just move forward beyond all of the "rebuild" and go directly to the installation steps...

Also, one more question - if having an auto Bronco xfer case and then going to convert to a Bronco manual xfer case - does one need to do anything with the driveshafts? Meaning, I have a 94 XLT w/ auto 4x4 - I want to go to a manual 4x4 setup and a friend of mine has a good 90 Bronco 1356 manual case - will that case be a direct swap and if so, would I have to do anything with my current driveshafts?

Will the 90 1356 that came from an AOD equipped rig bolt right up into place into a 94 that has an E4OD as long as the user purchases the correct E4OD xfer case linkage/parts?

thanks for any further info or help.
 
1 - 20 of 87 Posts
Top