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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1983 ford bronco with a 302 engine in it, while driving to work one day it stalled and would not start back up. I have replaced the control module, the ignition coil, the distributor, and the starter solenoid. Still wont start. Not sure what else to check... any help is greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is cranking but wont even try to start and it is getting fuel. Its carbureted and has a mechanical fuel pump.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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Ditto. Gotta have fuel, air, and spark. You should see a healthy spark when grounding the plug on the block. If its weak, you may have a faulty coil (even new).

BTW you look like my college roommate's twin, except his ears are gauged about 3/8"
 

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Driving Stuff Henry Built
-90 xlt, 351w, e4od, man 1356, 3.55, sag, warn hubs, 35s. -73, 400, np435, d20j twin, 35s
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Edit -Haha. I started typing before the two posts above & have had several interruptions along the way. I'll just leave this as-is even though it repeats some of what they ^ already said.

Whenever you have a no-start condition, I was taught to go back to the basics. An engine needs 3 things to run: spark, fuel, & compression. More specifically properly timed spark, air fuel mixture, & compression. By checking those you know which system to work on. I usually start with fuel & spark, because they are easier & more common than compression issues. Also if compression is low, it will typically crank unusually fast. I observe the cranking speed during the other tests. If it cranks oddly fast, then I do a compression test early on, but in most cases it's spark or fuel & the compression test isn't needed. If spark & fuel test ok, then you can always do the comp check after those.

Normally you check for those 3 things before doing any work. Because it all was working before, without doing any work, you know it is probably only one issue. But since you started changing parts, now it could be multiple problems.

At this point I think you should try a shot of starter fluid down the carb. If it is only a fuel related issue it should fire for a few seconds. Pull the air cleaner. With the key off, hold the choke open & spray it down the carb for about a second. Set the can aside & crank it. DO NOT spray while cranking. If it fires a little on starter fluid, then you start looking for a fuel related issue. Let us know how it goes & we can continue with further testing.

If you get no fire with starter fluid, then I'd check for spark. The easiest way is to use a spark tester from the auto parts store. It looks sort of like a spark plug with a clip on the side. You clip the tester onto ground, pull a plug wire & connect it to the tester. Crank the engine & you should see spark across the gap. There is also the old method where you put a screwdriver into the end of the plug wire, hold the driver (by the plastic handle only) close to ground to mimic a spark gap. Then have a helper crank the engine while you try to maintain the gap & watch for spark. If you see spark or get zapped, you know you have spark. I prefer the clip on the tester after many years of using the other method, including receiving the occasional zapping. :toothless

Since the distributor has been swapped, there is also the possibility of the wires being installed in the wrong order, or the dizzy itself being installed out of time. Double & triple check the proper firing order against the plug wires. You'd be surprised how many times plug wires get crossed up. As for proper timing of the dizzy, @sackman9975's write up: https://www.fullsizebronco.com/threads/how-to-properly-set-the-timing-on-a-302-or-351.168214/ will help you be sure it is installed correctly.
 
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