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Hello once again everyone, I have had plans to do some work on my steering soon. Some of it forced other because it should probably be done. So the other day I was up under my bronco taking a look at the tie rods and tie rod ends to make sure my Amazon cart had all the parts at which time I noticed the pitman arm had some kind of fluid on it. I posted it on a Facebook group that I'm on and the general consensus was the output shaft seal had gone bad and I was leaking power steering fluid(ATF because of age). So instead of rebuilding because I'm not entirely confident I could myself. I plan on going to a red head steering box. My question is what all parts go into replacing the gearbox and the pump. I would like to do all new lines as well because mine show signs of corrosion. I noticed while looking under the hood that mine has a sensor connected to a line. Is there a part number for this line as well? I haven't been able to find one online. Below is a picture of the pitman arm.
 

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Another note right now I have everything in a cart to get, All MOOG tie rods and tie rod ends, MOOG adjuster sleeves, and upper and lower ball joints, also from MOOG. I have a new power steering pump somewhere, so I need the lines which I have an idea on which ones to get, for the long lines(the high and low pressure) but I would like to replace the part that houses the sensor and the sensor as well. Also are there any filters on these lines? And if so is it worth having and to get a new one?
 

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The Tennessee Warden
96 XL, 5.8L, E4OD, BW1356, 4.56 gears
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You won’t need new lines or pressure sensor unless they are bad or leaking. The redhead gear will be a direct swap - just unhook the lines, pull off the pitman arm and unbolt the gear. Bolt in the new gear and hook the lines and pitman arm back up. Fill the reservoir with ATF and bleed the system, refill as needed, before cranking or you could aerate the fluid and cause problems.

If you need a new cooling coil to attach to the cross member, I actually have a used one in good condition you can have for shipping cost only. If you want a new pressure line, you can get one with a pressure port on it I think.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You won’t need new lines or pressure sensor unless they are bad or leaking. The redhead gear will be a direct swap - just unhook the lines, pull off the pitman arm and unbolt the gear. Bolt in the new gear and hook the lines and pitman arm back up. Fill the reservoir with ATF and bleed the system, refill as needed, before cranking or you could aerate the fluid and cause problems.

If you need a new cooling coil to attach to the cross member, I actually have a used one in good condition you can have for shipping cost only.

I do greatly appreciate the offer! But one of the things I am trying to do with the beast is put new parts on while I can find them. Which is sometimes very costly to do so but in my mind it will save me in the future compared to the cost of replacing used parts however many years later they decide to go. It's mainly peace of mind for me. Not to say I won't end up using used parts but if I can help it I would like to go new.
 

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The Tennessee Warden
96 XL, 5.8L, E4OD, BW1356, 4.56 gears
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NAPA has new cooling coils for the Bronco for like $25. They have a large selection of hoses as well. Call them and talk to someone. They’ll help you out. Does this look like it? It’s CarQuest PN 36102. It says it doesn’t fit a 90 but they’re not always right. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter #6
NAPA has new cooling coils for the Bronco for like $25. They have a large selection of hoses as well. Call them and talk to someone. They’ll help you out. Does this look like it? It’s CarQuest PN 36102. It says it doesn’t fit a 90 but they’re not always right. Lol
That does look about right.
IMG_20200212_124639.jpg
IMG_20200212_124603.jpg
 

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It does help to know the sensor has a small threaded end that screws into the block on it
 

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Found the right one on Amazon, so now all that's left to be ordered soon is gonna be the red head gear box.. gonna have to wait a bit before I can do that order.
 

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If you do ball joints, you should repack/replace wheel bearings and change the inner seals. I’d also look at replacing the spindle needle bearings and installing new spindle seals. Good time to inspect/replace rotors too. If you have any issues with your front diff, you’re just an axleshaft away from having the diff ready for maintenance.
 

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If you do ball joints, you should repack/replace wheel bearings and change the inner seals. I’d also look at replacing the spindle needle bearings and installing new spindle seals. Good time to inspect/replace rotors too. If you have any issues with your front diff, you’re just an axleshaft away from having the diff ready for maintenance.
Question about the wheel bearings, so I had done the right side wheel bearing last year about this time and after I did it I had to get an inspection, they told me that I had some play in the right hand wheel bearing after I replaced it and it needed tightened. With the way the wheel bearings are is there an actual way to tighten them? Or where my ball joints bad then and it was a misdiagnosis of the problem?
 

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Impossible for me to say. I believe bad ball joints will give you vertical movement of the tire, while loose bearings will give tire play if you grab the tire at 3 and 9 and push/pull.

The manual for my 80 calls for 0.001-0.006” axial play for the hub assembly. It’s a bit subjective as even a large screwdriver can provide enough prying force to show an easy 0.010-0.015”. I bumped it by grabbing the studs and pushing/pulling.

All that to say that I’d require someone to prove to me that my wheel bearings were too loose before allowing them to tighten them up. Plenty of stories of fried bearings due to over tightening.
 

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Impossible for me to say. I believe bad ball joints will give you vertical movement of the tire, while loose bearings will give tire play if you grab the tire at 3 and 9 and push/pull.

The manual for my 80 calls for 0.001-0.006” axial play for the hub assembly. It’s a bit subjective as even a large screwdriver can provide enough prying force to show an easy 0.010-0.015”. I bumped it by grabbing the studs and pushing/pulling.

All that to say that I’d require someone to prove to me that my wheel bearings were too loose before allowing them to tighten them up. Plenty of stories of fried bearings due to over tightening.
Well that's why I'm asking I don't know how a wheel bearing could be considered tight or loose with the way the are put together. The middle bearings are how they are configured..
 

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You can take all clearance out and even preload bearings by tightening the inner lock nut. Preload isn’t limited by shims, spacers, etc. As you tighten the nut, the outer bearing cone is forced into the cup. Continue to tighten and the outer bearing assembly begins to move the hub assembly toward the truck - this pushes the inner bearing cup into the cone. When you push far enough to seat the inner bearing cone against the spindle shoulder, further tightening loads the rollers into both cone and cup.

I hope this doesn’t come across as mansplaining or condescending. Just want to highlight that you can squeeze the bejeezus out of these bearings to the point of short-term failure.
 

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You can take all clearance out and even preload bearings by tightening the inner lock nut. Preload isn’t limited by shims, spacers, etc. As you tighten the nut, the outer bearing cone is forced into the cup. Continue to tighten and the outer bearing assembly begins to move the hub assembly toward the truck - this pushes the inner bearing cup into the cone. When you push far enough to seat the inner bearing cone against the spindle shoulder, further tightening loads the rollers into both cone and cup.

I hope this doesn’t come across as mansplaining or condescending. Just want to highlight that you can squeeze the bejeezus out of these bearings to the point of short-term failure.
Not at all! I wasn't sure exactly how you could "tighten" these bearings. Not in the conventional sense as with say when I had my 2005 Ford focus, it had rear drum breaks and if you tightened the nut too far it would cause the bearing to fail prematurely.
 
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