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Put a soft parts kit in about 1000 miles ago and a new torque converter. Runs great. Shifts too. Fluid puked out of front seal so I replaced it and it still did it. It only leaks if I drive it like over 25 mph. Only codes I have are speed sensor and 628 torque converter slipppage. Any advice.
 

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Yo Rodycewis,
Welcome!
'Fluid leakage from the pump will flow down the back of the converter housing. Leakage may be from loose or missing pump bolts, torn or damaged pump-to-case gasket and/or a worn pump bushing." by Ford

For now,, here's E4OD Front Pump Seal Replacement in a 96 @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/stj71a39.htm

DTC 62, 628 & 1744 Converter Overheat, High Line Pressure; "...E4OD/4R100 transmissions often have problems with converter overheat, codes 62, 628, 1744, high line pressure and low cooler. The OEM valve can close off critical converter/cooler circuit under high-demand situations, causing the TCC to drag on and glaze the lining at idle, or restricting converter/cooler charge during high load causing converter slip codes, overheat and lube failures. flow. Sonnax now offers an upgraded line-to-lube pressure regulator valve 36424-04K with a patented internal line-to-lube passage with anti-drainback check valve, and a revised balance-end orifice. While drilling the pump casting will allow full-time flow to the cooler circuit, it is not precise and allows converter drainback, causing delayed engagements complaints. A revised balance end orifice is built into the valve and ensures sufficient oil is fed to the end of the PR valve to keep the valve in the proper regulating position and further preventing converter/ cooler flow restrictions. This is a drop in replacement that requires no machining..."
Source: by sonnaflow.com

Too bad, and this is about the 5th Code 628 I've seen recently here;
so, hang in there and figure on the TC
Go thru this thread bec. GearHead has similar problems and same DTC 628; "...No studdering at all. Drove it 50+ miles today and it drove great. It may drive this way another 5 days and 500 miles. Or I may start it up tomorrow and it will shift hard the first time it changes gears..."
DTC 628; "...I did things in a stupid-simple way when the 628 came up: I tapped into the TCC line, and attached a voltmeter between that line and chassis ground. While driving, I could watch for it to go between zero volts (meaning the PCM was commanding the converter to lock) and battery voltage (meaning the converter should be unlocked). It sounds counterintuitive at first, but that's a matter of perspective, I suppose. Anyhow, if you see the PCM trying to lock the TCC and nothing happens to the engine speed, or if you can give it a little more throttle and the engine speed rises while it's commanded to lock, then you're assured a problem exists. If there was an electrical problem, then the PCM should also be giving you a code 627 as well. The 628 indicates excessive converter slippage. At a steady cruise, say your 60 mph, if you tap the brake the engine speed should rise slightly, and then come back down as the TCC re-engages. This condition can be intermittent, and it's more of a mechanical problem than an electrical one. The fix for a slipping TCC is to replace the torque converter and stator shaft seal, nothing more. You'd be out a little over a hundred bucks probably, and a few hours' labor, if you get one through a reputable transmission shop. I wouldn't buy anything but an OE-type replacement. You may even be able to get a Motorcraft/Ford replacement through a local dealership, but I've no clue how much their price would be..."
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) at DTC 628; "...I did things in a stupid-simple way when the 628 came up: I tapped into the TCC line, and attached a voltmeter between that line and chassis ground. While driving, I could watch for it to go between zero volts (meaning the PCM was commanding the converter to lock) and battery voltage (meaning the converter should be unlocked). It sounds counterintuitive at first, but that's a matter of perspective, I suppose. Anyhow, if you see the PCM trying to lock the TCC and nothing happens to the engine speed, or if you can give it a little more throttle and the engine speed rises while it's commanded to lock, then you're assured a problem exists. If there was an electrical problem, then the PCM should also be giving you a code 627 as well. The 628 indicates excessive converter slippage. At a steady cruise, say your 60 mph, if you tap the brake the engine speed should rise slightly, and then come back down as the TCC re-engages. This condition can be intermittent, and it's more of a mechanical problem than an electrical one. The fix for a slipping TCC is to replace the torque converter and stator shaft seal, nothing more. You'd be out a little over a hundred bucks probably, and a few hours' labor, if you get one through a reputable transmission shop. I wouldn't buy anything but an OE-type replacement. You may even be able to get a Motorcraft/Ford replacement through a local dealership, but I've no clue how much their price would be..."
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) at FSB
Also read Stang's 2 Links he posted.
===============
DTC 626, 628, 643, 652, P0741, P0743, P1754; "...Coast Clutch Solenoid (CCS) 7M107; The Coast Clutch Solenoid provides coast clutch control by shifting the coast clutch shift valve. The solenoid is activated by pressing the transmission control switch or by selecting the 1 or 2 range with the transmission gearshift selector lever. In manual 1 and 2, the coast clutch is controlled by the solenoid and also hydraulically as a fail-safe to ensure engine braking. In reverse, the coast clutch is controlled hydraulically and the solenoid is not on. NOTE: On certain applications, the coast clutch is controlled by the PCM in the overdrive position (TCS OFF) in gears 1, 2, and 3. Symptoms: Failed on - Third gear engine braking with (D) range selected. Failed off - No third gear engine braking in overdrive cancel..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
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DTC 62, 628 & 1744 Converter Overheat, High Line Pressure; "...E4OD/4R100 transmissions often have problems with converter overheat, codes 62, 628, 1744, high line pressure and low cooler. The OEM valve can close off critical converter/cooler circuit under high-demand situations, causing the TCC to drag on and glaze the lining at idle, or restricting converter/cooler charge during high load causing converter slip codes, overheat and lube failures. flow. Sonnax now offers an upgraded line-to-lube pressure regulator valve 36424-04K with a patented internal line-to-lube passage with anti-drainback check valve, and a revised balance-end orifice. While drilling the pump casting will allow full-time flow to the cooler circuit, it is not precise and allows converter drainback, causing delayed engagements complaints. A revised balance end orifice is built into the valve and ensures sufficient oil is fed to the end of the PR valve to keep the valve in the proper regulating position and further preventing converter/ cooler flow restrictions. This is a drop in replacement that requires no machining..."
Source: by sonnaflow.com
==============
Next is;
E4OD Transmission Control Indicator Lamp (TCIL) Flashing Diagnostic Trouble Codes 62, 628 and/or 1728 & transmission shifts hard by Ford for 90-96
in my site @
MARCH 2, 1998
LIGHT TRUCK:
1989-97 F SUPER DUTY, F-250 HD, F-350
1989-98 ECONOLINE, F-150, F-250 LD
1990-96 BRONCO
1997-98 EXPEDITION
1998 NAVIGATOR

This TSB article is being republished in its entirety to correct the vehicles listed.
ISSUE:
Some vehicles may exhibit a flashing Transmission Control Indicator Lamp (TCIL) and Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) 62, 628, and/or 1728 may be stored in memory. These DTCs can be set by any internal transmission element slippage or potentially by torque converter slippage.
ACTION:
Refer to the following text when servicing these codes.
NOTE:
WHEN SERVICING A VEHICLE WITH A FLASHING TCIL WITH DTCS 62, 628 AND/OR 1728, DO NOT REPLACE THE TORQUE CONVERTER UNLESS PROPER DIAGNOSIS HAS PROVEN THE TORQUE CONVERTER TO BE THE CAUSE.

Always verify the customer concern. Proper diagnosis for DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 may require talking to the customer to find out if there were any other symptoms associated with the TCIL flashing, (i.e., shift concerns, erratic/early/late, proper torque converter operation, etc.), prior to noticing the TCIL flashing.
Prior to transmission repairs for DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 or investigating other causes, repair all non-related transmission DTCs first, then repair all other transmission DTCs other than 62, 628 and/or 1728.
Some of the other causes that may result in DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 are as follows:
Aftermarket modifications (i.e., performance enhancers, electrical modifications, etc.)
Missing shifts (some/all)
Transmission fluid leakage (internal and/or external)
Erratic shift timing
Valves, springs or retainers in the main control/accumulator body not assembled correctly, binding or sticking
Check balls missing and/or mislocated. Damaged, unable to seal/seat properly
Higher or lower than normal line pressure
Transmission fluid restrictions and/or level check filter; may have become dislodged
Erratic/inoperative vehicle speed and/or rpm sensor
Poor engine performance concerns
Any vehicle system concerns that could cause the strategy to detect a perceived internal slippage or change in the expected rpm of internal transmission rotating components may cause DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 to set.
NOTE:
ONCE DTCs 62, 628 AND/OR 1728 SET, OTHER TRANSMISSION FUNCTIONAL DTCs MAY NOT SET.

1990 F Series/Bronco Pre-Delivery Shop & Electrical & Vacuum Troubleshooting Manuals (EVTM), Partial by member Kingfish999 in Google Drive (similar to your 91) @ 1990 Ford Truck service manuals - Google Drive
Slow scrolling for my slow Comcast Highest Cost Blast Internet..
Suggest you download the docs for faster scrolling and to use the page index.

1991 Bronco Dealer Brochure by Ford via via Dezo's Garage @

Haynes Red Manual for 80-95 Bronco & F Series @ Hanes guide 80-96 bko f series.pdf via member BroncMom

For any questions, it's better to post each seperately in Noobie section. This will get more attention and you can build up your post count to get into other sections such as Bronco and Ford Parts/Accessories that requires 50 non-padded posts to participate due to scammers who preyed on our members.

Our Forum FAQs includes for example, How To: Create your Signature; Upload Images To Posts, Search and more tips!

Baba Looey's Favorite FSB Links (lots and lots of tech links)including, "how do I get the tailgate glass to...", etc

Try to find time to participate and vote in our currennt Full-Size of the Month Contest & later in the year, Full-Size of the Year Contest @ Voting
You will get ideas by those competing.
Prizes are awarded to Winner; a full spread in Bronco Driver Magazine is the top prize, in addition to a years subscription, once the article is submitted; and a years worth of premium FSB membership!

Al
 

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Did you put a new bushing in the pump housing? I ask, because I put a new bushing in mine when I rebuilt my E4OD. That bushing after about 1000 miles walked forward and blocked the drain hole and puked all it's fluid out. You can read about it here in post #17 - Hey everybody!, and my 1994 Bronco maintenance and.... The fix for it is also linked in my thread.

Good luck!
 
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