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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i was looking at the tune up guides and i wanted to ask, if its really worth paying more for the MSD stuff? i hear people have had bad luck on the ignition coils.

Also since its 2020, technology as improved and wanted to ask if there's anything better?

Thanks

And yes i know its a very basic question.
 

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I have had no issue with them. All the coil does is provide the spark. A stock replacement is plenty strong and durable. There really isn;t anything to be gained by installing only a hotter coil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I’d just stick with motorcraft coil, cap and rotor, copper auto lite plugs, and Ford racing 9mm wires.

If you have a 302, over gap and bump timing. If you have a 351, stick with stock timing and gap.
by how much should i gap and bump the timing up ?
i was thinking some platinum spark plug
 

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I like the MSD premium ignition wires and their coil. Have several sets possibly from the mid or early 2000s though. Copper is ideal spark plugs; but they wear quick and need changes every 20-30k miles. You can try double platinum MC.
 

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Sayulita Layta!
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by how much should i gap and bump the timing up ?
i was thinking some platinum spark plug
.055 and 13 BDTC for the 302 (look up six litre tuneup). Those changes will cause pinging in the 351w though since that engine doesn’t have the knock sensor like the 302.

Also just go coppers. The platinums are meant for life longevity but won’t produce the best spark for our old engines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
.055 and 13 BDTC for the 302 (look up six litre tuneup). Those changes will cause pinging in the 351w though since that engine doesn’t have the knock sensor like the 302.

Also just go coppers. The platinums are meant for life longevity but won’t produce the best spark for our old engines.
Gotcha!!! thanks man ! and how long should i change em ? 10k?
 

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95 Bronco, 351W, E4OD, 4.56 gears, 35x12.50x15 Patagonia MTs. 94 Bronco 5.0/E4OD/1356/3.50 gears.
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The msd coil in my f350 failed after about 7 years of occassional use.

I run iridium or double platinum plugs, whichever is supposed to last longer. All of my newer vehicles ran them from the factory, they seem not to fall off or wear regardless of age. Probably the last set your engine will need, considerinf theyre often rated for 90-100k mile service intervals. Time is money, do it right once and forget it.

For wires, I like ford racing. Dont forget the dielectric grease!

Also, brass cap and rotor seem to outlast aluminum 2:1.
 

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Definitely Brass cap/rotor! The cheaper aluminum terminal variety works fine, bit does fall off and wear faster.

On these trucks most prefer a copper plug. Your choice. They last plenty long and we tend to get under there and tinker once in a while anyway. Also, the vast majority of FSB's are not driven long mileage every year and many, like myself, find 30k or so to be every 4-5 years. Copper, platinum, iridium all work though.

The msd coil in my f350 failed after about 7 years of occassional use.

I run iridium or double platinum plugs, whichever is supposed to last longer. All of my newer vehicles ran them from the factory, they seem not to fall off or wear regardless of age. Probably the last set your engine will need, considerinf theyre often rated for 90-100k mile service intervals. Time is money, do it right once and forget it.

Also, brass cap and rotor seem to outlast aluminum 2:1.


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Yo Fox,
Sixlitre Tune-Up;
"
Remember to get the cheapest Autolites or Motorcraft plugs you're money will buy, as anything better is wasted on smallblock Fords.

Stab the gap at .055, I've even used .060. Then bump the timing out to 13.5 degrees from the stock 10 (after you've checked where it was to begin with).

As far as the cap & rotor they're all good, as long as they're as good as new with no arc'ing on the inner terminals and no cracks in the plastic."

See EFI Performance Upgrades by former member and Ford Bronco, etc EFI GURU Ryan M @ Ford Fuel Injection » EFI Performance Upgrades

I
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yo Fox,
Sixlitre Tune-Up;
"
Remember to get the cheapest Autolites or Motorcraft plugs you're money will buy, as anything better is wasted on smallblock Fords.

Stab the gap at .055, I've even used .060. Then bump the timing out to 13.5 degrees from the stock 10 (after you've checked where it was to begin with).

As far as the cap & rotor they're all good, as long as they're as good as new with no arc'ing on the inner terminals and no cracks in the plastic."

See EFI Performance Upgrades by former member and Ford Bronco, etc EFI GURU Ryan M @ Ford Fuel Injection » EFI Performance Upgrades

I
alright!!! thanks :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Definitely Brass cap/rotor! The cheaper aluminum terminal variety works fine, bit does fall off and wear faster.

On these trucks most prefer a copper plug. Your choice. They last plenty long and we tend to get under there and tinker once in a while anyway. Also, the vast majority of FSB's are not driven long mileage every year and many, like myself, find 30k or so to be every 4-5 years. Copper, platinum, iridium all work though.





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which would be better?


 

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1st or 3rd because the middle one is aluminum.
Aluminum will work, but the brass conducts better and last longer being a harder metal.

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I posted this to another Thread about Sparkplugs and the "Copper Plugs" designation a while back!!!

BTW if you look at Platinum, Iridium and Unobtanium plugs the center core is almost always Copper, the only place they are special metal is on the tips, the ground electrodes are usually Nickel and some special metal or just Nickel. The same goes for Std Cheapo Copper plugs, the tips are not Copper but usually Nickel and the ground electrodes are usually Nickel, with the Copper as the core.

Being the Anal Engamaneer that I am I must shed some light here!

Copper's Melting point is ---- 1084.62°C, 1984.32°F, 1357.77 K - Copper is not used externally on a Spark plug it is only used inside the Spark plug as a Copper core, with Nickle on the Tips and Ground electrode. These are the Cheap Copper core plugs mentioned on this site.

Nickel's Melting point is ------ 1455°C, 2651°F, 1728 K -------------------------------- used on the Spark plug exterior Tip and or Ground electrode with Copper core or Nickel core.

Platinum's Melting point is --- 1768.2°C, 3214.8°F, 2041.4 K ------------------------ used on the Spark plug exterior Tip and or Ground electrode with Copper core, always.

Iridium's Melting point is ------ 2446°C, 4435°F, 2719 K (it is very brittle though) used on the Spark plug exterior Tip and Ground electrode with Copper core, always.
And this from NGK's site:

5.“Copper spark plugs”

“Copper spark plugs” is a term often used to describe a standard material spark plug. However, this terminology is incorrect, as standard material plugs do not have electrodes made from copper. Copper is soft with a low melting point and cannot be used for electrodes, as they would wear very quickly. A standard material spark plug uses a nickel-alloy that may include a small copper core. The copper core has nothing to do with the electrical performance of the spark plug. A copper core is used to increase heat dissipation and durability by lowering the electrode temperatures. Nearly all NGK spark plugs, including precious metal iridium and platinum plugs, have a copper core to increase the electrode durability. Special nickel alloys, platinum, and iridium electrodes, along with copper cores are all used to enhance durability – durability meaning how long a spark plug will last before it needs to be replaced.

This is all FYI stuff! Use it accordingly. The above info is Fact and what I'm saying below is my "Opinion" and we all know about "Opinions"!!!

I think Spark Plugs have gotten a bad rap over the years. We are wanting a HIGHER OUTPUT coil to get more voltage to the plugs, the best Cap and Rotor with the best contact material, the best/least restrictive Wires and then we are shying away from the newer technology plugs that require less voltage to fire said plugs. This all sounds counterintuitive!!! It only takes "X" amount of Voltage to fire a Sparkplug depending on the conditions in the Combustion chamber at the time. So theoretically a newer style Precious metal plug be it Platinum, Iridium, Unobtanium or any combination of, would require less Voltage to cross the gap than an older style Nickle plug whether it was "Copper Cored" or "Nickel Cored". The newer style plugs are Designed to last a lot longer then the old style std plugs and the only draw back to the new style plugs is their respective increased costs. The Sparkplug hasn't changed much over the years except for different materials added to them and an extra Ground electrode here and there or it's shape.
I venture to say get Whatever Plugs you choose or want to spend your hard earned Money on and make sure before you install them you check their gap and install them per the Manufacturer's instructions and depending on said Plugs check them accordingly and MAKE SURE your Wires and Boots are in GOOD shape and connected securely cause we all know how close they are to the Exhaust manifolds or Header Tubes. Some Boot sleeves on some of the plugs wouldn't be bad insurance no matter what plugs you use.

Let the Flames begin!!!! :devilish:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I posted this to another Thread about Sparkplugs and the "Copper Plugs" designation a while back!!!



And this from NGK's site:

5.“Copper spark plugs”

“Copper spark plugs” is a term often used to describe a standard material spark plug. However, this terminology is incorrect, as standard material plugs do not have electrodes made from copper. Copper is soft with a low melting point and cannot be used for electrodes, as they would wear very quickly. A standard material spark plug uses a nickel-alloy that may include a small copper core. The copper core has nothing to do with the electrical performance of the spark plug. A copper core is used to increase heat dissipation and durability by lowering the electrode temperatures. Nearly all NGK spark plugs, including precious metal iridium and platinum plugs, have a copper core to increase the electrode durability. Special nickel alloys, platinum, and iridium electrodes, along with copper cores are all used to enhance durability – durability meaning how long a spark plug will last before it needs to be replaced.

This is all FYI stuff! Use it accordingly. The above info is Fact and what I'm saying below is my "Opinion" and we all know about "Opinions"!!!

I think Spark Plugs have gotten a bad rap over the years. We are wanting a HIGHER OUTPUT coil to get more voltage to the plugs, the best Cap and Rotor with the best contact material, the best/least restrictive Wires and then we are shying away from the newer technology plugs that require less voltage to fire said plugs. This all sounds counterintuitive!!! It only takes "X" amount of Voltage to fire a Sparkplug depending on the conditions in the Combustion chamber at the time. So theoretically a newer style Precious metal plug be it Platinum, Iridium, Unobtanium or any combination of, would require less Voltage to cross the gap than an older style Nickle plug whether it was "Copper Cored" or "Nickel Cored". The newer style plugs are Designed to last a lot longer then the old style std plugs and the only draw back to the new style plugs is their respective increased costs. The Sparkplug hasn't changed much over the years except for different materials added to them and an extra Ground electrode here and there or it's shape.
I venture to say get Whatever Plugs you choose or want to spend your hard earned Money on and make sure before you install them you check their gap and install them per the Manufacturer's instructions and depending on said Plugs check them accordingly and MAKE SURE your Wires and Boots are in GOOD shape and connected securely cause we all know how close they are to the Exhaust manifolds or Header Tubes. Some Boot sleeves on some of the plugs wouldn't be bad insurance no matter what plugs you use.

Let the Flames begin!!!! :devilish:
im between the platinum or normal copper core, not sure if the actual spark is good or better in the platinum, cause remember, you have to gap em and doing so makes the travel between both contacts longer.

Yeah i dont think i need higher output coil, but i might be tempted for the cap and rotor.

yes, let the flames begin, and let MOH POWA BABE begin
 

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93 XLT 347, GT40 Heads, Bassani headers/exhaust, E4OD
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The msd coil in my f350 failed after about 7 years of occassional use.

I run iridium or double platinum plugs, whichever is supposed to last longer. All of my newer vehicles ran them from the factory, they seem not to fall off or wear regardless of age. Probably the last set your engine will need, considerinf theyre often rated for 90-100k mile service intervals. Time is money, do it right once and forget it.

For wires, I like ford racing. Dont forget the dielectric grease!

Also, brass cap and rotor seem to outlast aluminum 2:1.
My MSD coil failed just out of warranty (~14 months).

I like the Ford Racing wires as well, but run the cheapest Autolite copper plugs that fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
My MSD coil failed just out of warranty (~14 months).

I like the Ford Racing wires as well, but run the cheapest Autolite copper plugs that fit.
exactly what i was thinking, msd cap and rotor are good just not the coils from what i heard, so on my tune up ill get a motor craft or duralast coil, some motorcraft sparkplugs, ford racing wires and a MSD cap and rotor
 

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which would be better?


I’ve used the middle one 3x now over 16 years of ownership, no issues. I swap it out same interval as spark plugs.
 
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