Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner
141 - 160 of 182 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #141 · (Edited)
Well, when it warmed up today I went out and put the coil spring back and let it sit on it’s own weight. There was still about a 2” drop between the frame and the bracket, and the pinion angle looked way off.

170330


170331


Then I got to looking and thinking that if I used the right on the left, and left on the right, they might have better angles. So I measured one and saw that the “centerline” of the rear bushing compared to the front that bolts to the axle beams is much lower than makes sense. I laid one out and used a square to see that, when used right-side-up, the rear busing is about 4” lower than If I were to flip it over.

170332


170333


170334


170335
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #142 · (Edited)
Once I decided to flip the beam, I wondered if there would be a problem doing this. Then
I noticed the rear bushing is at an angle. I laid it down again and measured how off the angle of the bushing is to the centerline of the beam mounting holes

170336


170337


It was around 7* off. I went ahead and put the right hand beam on the left side upside down to see how it fit. It went on fine, and the bracket was nearly the perfect height related to the frame, however, the bushing was way off, like probably 15ish degrees.

170338


170339


My option to use these beams upside down looks like I’ll need to use a spherical / hiem / ball and socket, type joint to make up for the misalignment.

Or, I could try the “cut and turn” approach and move the beam mounting hole on the lower side of the arm forward to move the bushing up (using the beam right side up).

I put the dimensions into autocad and determined that to move the bushing up 4ish inches, I need to move the lower hole about 3/4” forward.

I think that’s the route I’m going to take. I’ll start cutting and welding tomorrow.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #143 ·
I went to Farm and Fleet and bought some 3/16” x 3/4” and some 3/16” x 1” flat stock. The material the arms are made of appears to be about 3/16”.

There are two layers of material, so I figured I’d cut thru one and move that hole forward .75-1” to get me the angle I need.

I started by cutting one layer of the lower mounting hole off, leaving enough so that when I reattach the hole, I won’t burn thru

170376


Then I laid down a 1” strip of 3/16 and welded it down.

170377


Then I reinstalled the hole.

170378


Then I flipped it over and used a 1/4” material to fill in the top, and the old hole.

170380


170381


170382
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #144 · (Edited)
Then I found my calipers and measured the correctly located hole and marked its location on the new material. I used several, maybe 5, different drill bits and plenty of oil to get up to the 3/4” hole that the arm-to-beam bolts thru

170383


170384


Now, I needed to ‘bend’ the beams to make my holes line up. I happen to have an extra set of arms from way back when, and since it would be way easier to do all this test fitting here, rather than under the Bronco, I drug them out.

I bolted the top hole to the top of the beam and marked a line to cut thru one layer to make the bend easier

170385


170386


170387


Then I did the same thing on the bottom hole.

170388


Once I was able to line up both the bottom and top holes, I bolted them down and welded the cuts closed, unbolted the arm from the beam, and finished the places I couldn’t reach before

170389
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #145 ·
It was starting to get dark, so I put everything away and went in for the night.

Tomorrow I’ll clean up all the welds, maybe add some material to strengthen everything, and paint the arm. Then I have do the same with the passenger side.

It’s looking like I won’t get done with everything before it gets dark tomorrow afternoon, so I might be driving the old F150 to work for a few days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #146 · (Edited)
I tried the modified/lengthened arm and I appeared to fit fine. Then I decided that I really didn’t feel like spending the day welding, so I put the original radius arm and drop bracket back on, so I could drive it when I needed to. I also messed with the driver side alignment bushing and have the tire more vertical than it was.

I need to modify the passenger side superduty beam, hopefully this week, so I can swap everything over next weekend and be done with this next little project.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #149 ·
Pretty much that

There was a thread on here a couple years ago discussing it. I saw a truck at the junkyard so equipped, so I got them. I then found a thread on gofastbroncos doing a google search that explained it more. I assume I can post a link to here.

Superduty Radius Arms - GoFastBroncos.com

Because it’s gotten cold out, I doubt I’ll get them painted and installed before next spring.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,219 Posts
Pretty much that

There was a thread on here a couple years ago discussing it. I saw a truck at the junkyard so equipped, so I got them. I then found a thread on gofastbroncos doing a google search that explained it more. I assume I can post a link to here.

Superduty Radius Arms - GoFastBroncos.com

Because it’s gotten cold out, I doubt I’ll get them painted and installed before next spring.
dang! the side by side picture says a lot

 

·
Registered
93 F-150
Joined
·
160 Posts
Good thread. I will be pulling the 302/AOD out of my 93 and putting in an 351/ZF set from an 88 F350. I have all wiring and the computer so it should be pretty straightforward as long as my new cam/heads will cooperate with the SD to atleast let it idle. I'm also hoping sourcing driveshafts isn't a nightmare. Would like to avoid custom if I can.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #153 · (Edited)
The front driveshaft from the truck should be the right length. Maybe not if the D60 from the F350 has a longer pinion? Front driveshaft from any manual truck from your era should work. I just ordered a cheap rear from a same year bronco with a manual transmission.

you might want to measure the one from your AOD, as the driveshafts were longer than ones for the E4OD. If too long, they can be shortened easier than being made longer.

did you happen to keep the D60 from that F350?
 

·
Registered
93 F-150
Joined
·
160 Posts
The front driveshaft from the truck should be the right length. Maybe not if the D60 from the F350 has a longer pinion? Front driveshaft from any manual truck from your era should work. I just ordered a cheap rear from a same year bronco with a manual transmission.

you might want to measure the one from your AOD, as the driveshafts were longer than ones for the E4OD. If too long, they can be shortened easier than being made longer.

did you happen to keep the D60 from that F350?

No, I found the engine and transmission from a guy a couple hours north of me in Mass. Had I had room to put it I would have at least tried to take the whole rig from him but he said his dad was going to throw a 6bt in it. I don't even recall what the body style was. I think it was a reg cab long bed and my truck is reg cab short bed.
 

·
Registered
93 F-150
Joined
·
160 Posts
I missed your signature that said you have an F150. Should be a lot easier to find driveshafts from a manual pickup
Yea from what I can gather the M5OD is extremely close in length to the ZF so maybe I can use one of those.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #157 ·
This little update is vaguely related to my transmission swap.

Since I don’t have the auto anymore, I used the old heat exchanger as a power steering cooler for a while. It was kinda cobbled together. I had what was left of the return line from the 4-bolt steering gear off of a junkyard truck. Hard line crimped to a 3/8” hose. That was reduced down to a 5/16, since that’s what the old cooler was. Line from the cooler back to the pump was also 5/16, stretched out once it got back to the pump to clamp over that 3/8 fitting. Seemed to work Ok.

Until one snowy day back in January, when I started the bronco to go to work, and I noticed I had no power steering. Got out to find all my fluid on the ground. Turns out the hose going into the cooler had blown off the hard line. If you look, I had it it double clamped on, but there was no barb on the tube to really hold it. I figured ‘no big deal’, it had held up for about 6 months without issue. put 3 clamps on and refilled.

179392


That lasted about a week.

The hose didn’t come off the tube again, it split where I had the hose reduced down from 3/8 to 5/16.

I figured I needed to get a cooler with 3/8 fittings so the flow would be consistent end to end. Being a cheap bastard, I looked at some superdutys in the junkyard. Turns out they have a 3/8 barbed fitting on both ends, and were relatively cheap. Like $10. I forgot to take a pic until after I installed it. The problem with them, however, is that they’re mounted low and at about a 45* angle to the radiator support. I couldn’t find a good place on mine, so I fabbed a bracket to mount it to the hood latch support behind the center of the grille.

179398


So far, so good. I don’t have any kind of temp sensor in the system, so I can’t tell how well it cools, but I’m sure it’s better than the old non-finned tube on the engine crossmember.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #158 ·
Also, since the weather is getting better, I’m getting ready to do the superduty radius arms. I realized last weekend that my shocks probably won’t work. I went on rockauto and got the part number for the F350 2WD shocks that would have come with the truck I took the arms off of. Then I got the dimensions from the KYB catalog. I found some that were about 6” longer (lift size) and ordered them today. They’re supposed to show up before Saturday.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #159 ·
The shocks arrived, and before it starts raining, and potentially delaying my install, I painted the arms and brackets. I’m not looking for a show finish, and they’ll probably look silly until they get dirtied up to match the rest of the undercarriage. I sprayed them with foaming engine degreaser, scrubbed them with a stiff brush, rinsed them with the hose, shot them with brake cleaner to get the remaining crap off and help dry them, then a coat of rusty metal primer, then some semigloss black. It will hopefully keep them from getting rustier. I also sprayed some liquid wrench liberally around the radius arm hardware on the bronco the help removal when the time comes.

179512


179513


179514
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #160 · (Edited)
It rained most of the day Saturday, so I worked in the house. Seeing the forecast made me consider putting this off another week, but I managed to get them both installed today before it started raining. I started with the passenger side, since I haven’t had it apart since I did the lift probably 10 years ago. Took some cheater bars and heat to get the bolts that hold the radius arm to the beam off. Other than the complexity of having to reinstall the spring, let the bronco rest it’s weight on it to locate the radius arm bracket, drill holes, bolt it together, then pull the tire and spring back off to tighten up the big bolts, it wasn’t that bad.

179607


179609


Driver’s side went faster. I decided to eliminate the front shocks for no other reason than everything I’ve read says they really don’t do much, and mine were really old and junk anyway.

the KBY shocks were silver and said ‘made in Japan’ on them. Per the KYB catalog, these shocks are meant for an 87-91 Isuzu trooper, rear. They had the top mount that matched the bronco, and the bottom mount that matched the superduty arms, with a length 6” longer than standard SD shocks. There were other shocks they offered that were for other vehicles, but I figured if it’s good enough for the weight of an suv rear, they’re probably ok for the front of my bronco.

I took it for a short drive to make sure nothing was so out of whack that I couldn’t drive it to work tomorrow, and it seemed “looser” than it did before, and body roll was more noticeable. Not sure if it’s the shocks or the extra travel, maybe easier range of movement, of the longer arms?

either way, I need to adjust the camber bushings as the passenger side is leaning out at the top again.
 
141 - 160 of 182 Posts
Top