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Hey guys, I'm replacing the front wheel bearings on my bronco and having a real big problem. On the driver side, everything was smooth sailing. The passenger side, not so much. For some reason, afterms putting my outer bearing back into the rotor and then placing the wheel seal in, the rotor will not slide far enough back on the spindle. I took it all back apart and attempted to slide just the bearing on to test fit and the bearing will not go back into position. I double checked and it's the correct bearing and I even got a second one just in case it was packaged wrong. It seems the bearing is correct but it just won't go back into place. Suggestions?

Thanks,
justin.
 

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Look at the spindle closely for burrs or flat spots. I would be ok with cleaning these up if there are any, assuming they are not extreme, and then see if the bearing will go on all the way.
Do you have pictures of what is going on, maybe someone will be able to see something if you do.
Also are you doing this as normal maintenance or was something going on to prompt you to change them? I have seen spindles in bad shape from someone removing them with a hammer to change out the front u-joints. Maybe someone hit the bearing surface at some point and that is causing your issue. also why I said to look for flat spots
Do you still have the original bearing you could compare the new ones too?
 

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Look at the spindle closely for burrs or flat spots. I would be ok with cleaning these up if there are any, assuming they are not extreme, and then see if the bearing will go on all the way.
Do you have pictures of what is going on, maybe someone will be able to see something if you do.
Also are you doing this as normal maintenance or was something going on to prompt you to change them? I have seen spindles in bad shape from someone removing them with a hammer to change out the front u-joints. Maybe someone hit the bearing surface at some point and that is causing your issue. also why I said to look for flat spots
Do you still have the original bearing you could compare the new ones too?
This ^^^^ is correct.

You can, but it's certainly not recommended, take a flapper to the inside of the race to open it up a bit. Usually a bit of emory cloth and elbow grease will clean your spindle up enough though.
 

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I had the same problem. Took hours to make it fit. In a wheel bearing write up, someone used strips of very fine sand paper and sanded around where the bearing seats on the spindle. I had to do that also, plus putting the new spindle in the freezer for a little bit.
 

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I had the same problem. Took hours to make it fit. In a wheel bearing write up, someone used strips of very fine sand paper and sanded around where the bearing seats on the spindle. I had to do that also, plus putting the new spindle in the freezer for a little bit.
Yup, that was me... I did that with my 95. The tolerance between the bearing and the spindle is so minimal that it only takes a couple of small burs to keep the bearing from going on. The trick, no matter the media you use, it to check the fit frequently. You dont want to overdue it. Its also imperative that you are placing the hub on evenly. It can be a bit of a frustrating process so dont try and rush through it!
 

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As Shane mentioned, if you are off center when installing the hub it could prevent the bearing from seating on the spindle. Try and figure out where the bearing/spindle interference is when test fitting the bearing directly on to the spindle. You should be able to see what is preventing the bearing from going the rest of the way on.
 

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Get a roll of the strip emory cloth that plumbers use, when sweating copper pipe. Using your fingernail, drag it across the spindle, where the bearing rides. Buff the rough spots on the spindle, with the emory cloth. Clean the spindle of metal dust before trial fitting the rotor. Repeat the process till the rotor slides on. Also, check the bearing itself for any burrs, or dings.
 
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