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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
It was time for a fluid change and an upgrade to the rear diff cover. Pick up appropriate differential gear lube and some RTV sealant at you local parts store.


Tools/Parts needed for the job:

* Safety glasses - never a bad idea
* Rubber gloves
* 3/8 Ratchet, and 1/2 socket
* torque wrench
* flat blade screwdriver
* Brake Cleaner
* Drain pan
* Small funnel with hose funnel or other means of refill the differential
* Rags/paper towels
* Hand Cleaner
* 3 quarts 80W90 or appropriate differential gear lube for your application
* Friction Additive - depending on your differential.
* Replacement differential cover gasket - I won't be using a gasket but you may
* Gasket type blue silicone sealer
* scraper blade or flat wide chisel
* After Market Cover -optional.



Start by removing the bolts that hold the cover


Leave 2 or 3 bolts loose in the top to help control the flood of fluid that is about to come out.


Use an old flat tip screwdriver to pry the cover off. Use caution here so you don't scratching the mating surface.


Check the gears for wear and damage, now is a good time to grab a coffee to let the fluid drain out.


Scrap the old gasket or silicon off, I also use brake clean to clean off the gears and help remove any residue gear oil.


Remove the fill plug


Inspect the plug it for chunks of metal. Small particles are normal, but anything large is cause for concern and will need to be investigated. Clean any metal shavings & sludge off the plug.


Use some brake clean




Use some brake clean to help remove the fluid




Now would be a good time to upgrade your differential cover, apply a bead of silicone gasket to the cover for a leak proof seal - I used Permatex® Ultra Copper. The permatex instructions state that you should immediately install the cover, then tighten the bolts finger tight. leave it 1 hour, then tighten another 1/4-1/2 turn. This helps ensure you are not squeezing it out. It fully cures in 24 hours, so try to make time to let it sit a few hours before putting the gear oil back in.


Install the cover and tighten down the bolts. Torque the bolts to spec. Do not over tighten as this will cause the sealant to squeeze out and may result in a poor seal. Consult your service manual for the proper torque specs.


If you have a limited slip or Tracloc, that has clutches you'll need to add some friction modifier.


Refill with the appropriate differential gear lube for your application, I have an Auburn ECTED and it calls for 80W90 non-synthetic hypoid. The 8.8 takes almost 3 liters.


Fill until the fluid flows out of the fill hole.


Apply some sealant to the filler plug and install.


Now is a great time to paint the cover, clean the cover with some brake clean, cover the areas you don't want paint and spray.


Doesn't look so bad!:beer Now go for a drive to warm up the fluid, check the level it will likely need a top up.



*Please dispose of your old fluid at a local oil recycling station, not in the trash!:twak

Note: the rockcrusher cover was purchased off of ebay for 60.00bucks, for heavy use I recommend you buy a cover from Ruffstuff Specialties. Click
 

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You shouldn't need sealant on that drain plug. I use anti-sieze. I'm not sure I could have gotten it out if it had been sealed in.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You shouldn't need sealant on that drain plug. I use anti-sieze. I'm not sure I could have gotten it out if it had been sealed in.
I do it all the time it comes out nice and smooth, just extra insurance is all had one leak once.
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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I do it all the time it comes out nice and smooth, just extra insurance is all had one leak once.
You can. The trick here is for some reason people think this bolt needs to be cranked down, when in fact just a little snug is all it needs. i also like that you did not use the rockcrusher fill hole as that is likely too high. It's just supposed to be up to about 1/4" below the stock 8.8 fill hole as i recall.

I'm getting ready to install my ruffstuff diff covers front and rear, that was a heck of a good deal at christmas, could not resist, both covers for $167.

Since you're up north did you use a standard 75-90W? And why the "copper" gasket maker, I think I just use the ultra black since it takes some pretty high temp extremes.

EDIT: found it, but how come you are using an 85w-140 gear oil, you tow heavy loads????
http://www.bmed.mcgill.ca/dept_resources/machine_shop/miscellaneous/msds/Motomaster 2802366.pdf


Here are a couple links for permatex gasket stuff to possibly use:

http://www.permatex.com/products/au...mum_Temperature_RTV_Silicone_Gasket_Maker.htm

This is the one I prefer:
http://www.permatex.com/products/au..._Oil_Resistance_RTV_Silicone_Gasket_Maker.htm
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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17,025 Posts
is that the bullet proof diff cap??

looks good
Nope !

Check this out, firing various caliber rifles at various diff covers:

http://www.jpmagazine.com/techarticles/drivetrain/154_0708_bulletproof_test/photo_19.html

Unfortunately at the time this was done they did not get any samples from RuffstuffSpecialties. Many of the covers are some form of cast steel or iron of some thickness and they held up well. None of the plate steel covers were more than 1/4" steel (except the Great Lakes one that has an extra rib of plate steel at the gears, making it 1/2" thick there, and they were not able to punch a hole through it. I just wonder what Ruffstuff's would withstand being 3/8th's A50 plate steel throughout (not just the ring and not just around the gear):



 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #8
You can. The trick here is for some reason people think this bolt needs to be cranked down, when in fact just a little snug is all it needs. i also like that you did not use the rockcrusher fill hole as that is likely too high. It's just supposed to be up to about 1/4" below the stock 8.8 fill hole as i recall.

I'm getting ready to install my ruffstuff diff covers front and rear, that was a heck of a good deal at christmas, could not resist, both covers for $167.

Since you're up north did you use a standard 75-90W? And why the "copper" gasket maker, I think I just use the ultra black since it takes some pretty high temp extremes.

EDIT: found it, but how come you are using an 85w-140 gear oil, you tow heavy loads????
http://www.bmed.mcgill.ca/dept_resources/machine_shop/miscellaneous/msds/Motomaster 2802366.pdf


Here are a couple links for permatex gasket stuff to possibly use:

http://www.permatex.com/products/au...mum_Temperature_RTV_Silicone_Gasket_Maker.htm

This is the one I prefer:
http://www.permatex.com/products/au..._Oil_Resistance_RTV_Silicone_Gasket_Maker.htm
You got that right the fill hole is way too high and will likely blow fluid out the vent. I tried to hid the front of the jug I used because its not the fluid I used, I used 80w90 as thats what my diff calls for but only had it in 4L jugs so I found those 1L you see in the pics and funneled the fluid over in them as I didn't have a pump. Got good eyes! :shocked
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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actually I just ran a search on your part number at the top of that bottle...28-0236-6...I was wondering why in the world you'd be running such a heavy oil up there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
actually I just ran a search on your part number at the top of that bottle...28-0236-6...I was wondering why in the world you'd be running such a heavy oil up there.
When I was about to take the pic I realized I couldn't take a picture of the front of the jug or someone was going to say something about the weight (likely you) so I spun it around thinking no one would be the wiser. Dam you! I had anticipated you saying something about the cast cover (Shadofax is going to call you out on that cover!) so I added that last line to beat you to the punch. ;)
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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When I was about to take the pic I realized I couldn't take a picture of the front of the jug or someone was going to say something about the weight (likely you) so I spun it around thinking no one would be the wiser. Dam you! I had anticipated you saying something about the cast cover (Shadofax is going to call you out on that cover!) so I added that last line to beat you to the punch. ;)
I've gotten pretty good at searching out part numbers, often need to when trying to track down dana/spicer stuff.:rockon:thumbup

That's a cast STEEL or IRON cover you have though, isn't it? Did you see my post on the rifle tests...I'd say there is nothing wrong with what you bought unless it's aluminum, which is great for dissipating heat on a tow rig, but won't last on trails for very long.

I was going back and forth with Jackhart (I think) on his ARB cast cover, but only because that was like $200, you paid $60. Is a $200 cover really worth it when you can have the very strong plate steel one from Ruffstuff (2 of them actually, + change) for that kinda money?
 

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An additional note on this write-up: If it's very cold when you are filling the rear end, fill it `til it leaks out, put the plug in, and wait an hour or so, then check it again. You'll probably find that it's low. This is because it takes a while for the lube to run out to the end of the axle tubes and level out. I found this when I just did the rear axle bearings on mine, at about 10 degrees F. I actually drove mine a bit before checking it, but it was only about 4-6 ounces low, and I pre-greased the bearings when I installed them, so I doubt I did any damage. It's an easy job to replace them, anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
An additional note on this write-up: If it's very cold when you are filling the rear end, fill it `til it leaks out, put the plug in, and wait an hour or so, then check it again. You'll probably find that it's low. This is because it takes a while for the lube to run out to the end of the axle tubes and level out. I found this when I just did the rear axle bearings on mine, at about 10 degrees F. I actually drove mine a bit before checking it, but it was only about 4-6 ounces low, and I pre-greased the bearings when I installed them, so I doubt I did any damage. It's an easy job to replace them, anyway.
Good point, I added that to the writeup. :beer
 

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What is the proper way to get the plug out of the front (by the pinion yoke)

I have always just used a 3/8"s extension but have wondered if that is the best way...
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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If you need something more, go review my post earlier...this plug is not supposed to be tightened down. Think of it like your Tcase fill and drain plugs. light on the torque....;)
 

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Enjoy my
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If you need something more, go review my post earlier...this plug is not supposed to be tightened down. Think of it like your Tcase fill and drain plugs. light on the torque....;)
Yea I saw that, don't worry I looked up the torque specs in my haynes when I put the plug back in. I had to change my seal b/c it took a dump.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If you need something more, go review my post earlier...this plug is not supposed to be tightened down. Think of it like your Tcase fill and drain plugs. light on the torque....;)
Just snug enough so it doesn't leak or fall off - kind of like your spark plugs and everyone tightens them down way too hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
How do you like your ECTED and want did you use to keep the magnet from spinning?
Its not bad, I had some snapping from it when I first installed it, but I changed the fluid to another brand and it seems to have gone away. Not sure how well it would work in high traction areas like on rocks though. The magnet is retained by a tab on the bottom right cap bolt, you can see it in one of the pics above.
 
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