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Man, I'm glad you posted that. I would have been researching steering and suspension stuff the rest of the week... When you posted, I had the Bronco out for a short drive to meet up with a friend. I only took it up to 30-35 mph and boy was it a handful, veering all over the lane, with lots of play in the steering. (I thought I had lined up the "new" steering wheel pretty close when stationary, but it's actually like 15 degrees off once the truck is moving.) They were that loose new?? No wonder they're so much more popular as off-roaders than around-towners. On a smooth, straight road, I actually felt like I was driving on soft gravel.
No, they didn't have that much slack when new. And there are things that can be done to fix them, like upgrading the steering box to a 4 bolt or redhead, replacing the rag joint, and swapping the steering shaft for a borgeson solid shaft, but 25 years of abuse have probably worn out a lot of parts. I just meant that with any bronco I expect it to have a lot of slop in the steering. As always though, check parts before replacing. And even new these trucks had a kinda vague steering with very little road feel compared to a rack and pinion setup. It's just part of the design. They are setup more for suspension articulation and use an older design. I just wanted you to know that what you are experiencing is normal wear for a 25 year old bronco.

And I didn't mean to offend you by saying your expectations were probably too high, I just knew you had mentioned you were more used to small, lightweight cars that are setup for better road handling and probably have a higher power to weight ratio than the bronco. But it sounds like you have a good handle on things.

As far as the throttle response, it sounds like maybe a stumble or something. Not really sure what's going on there, maybe test the tps?

Once you get a few of the kinks worked out and get used to driving it you'll enjoy driving it more. As always, keep up the good work!
 

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Discussion Starter #242
Ah, so it is a wear and tear issue, just not an abnormal one. My initial thought was I had a blown shock or horrible alignment... I've read a little about the 4-bolt steering box upgrades, but not in-depth. My impression was that that adds power steering assist? I would want less assist, if anything. Even during fairly tight cornering, it was a bit lighter than I care for. In a straight line, it's way too light.

No offense taken, no worries. My daily driver has significantly more power and torque, while weighing a third less than the Bronco. I have no aspirations of that kind of performance.

I have a new Motorcraft TPS, but I never did do the voltage check. I just eyeballed it in matching the old unit's placement, as the position on the bottom of the TB seemed like way too much of a PITA to tinker with until knowing if it needed attention. That might be worth looking into now.

Here's a couple pics of the LED bumper lights wired up...





I couldn't get a good shot of them lighting up the street (too grainy/blurry with no flash, too washed out with the flash), but they're significantly brighter than the low beams. Probably two to three times as bright. Not bad for an $80 set of cubes. In case I didn't post the link before, here it is:

https://www.costco.com/Great-Whites-By-Vision-X-Lighting-3.5"-LED-Flood-Work-Lights--.product.100294428.html
 

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Discussion Starter #243
Some random updates...

I finally tackled an idea I mentioned a while back: uni-strut tie-downs. I had first bolted down just the fronts, using the rear seat mounting points, then had the brilliant idea to add some D-rings. I headed across town to help friends move, only to realize it was my worst decision ever. With nothing anchoring the rear of each bar, they were vibrating like spring boards, which was compounded by choosing 2-piece D-rings that are free to flop around when not tensioned, which was in turn compounded by the Bronco being low on the mellow ride characteristics. It was the loudest racket imaginable. My ears were ringing for the next 6+ hours, even the one I plugged for most of the drive.

With small bungees tensioning the rings, things were nearly silent. Only big jostling would get the loose rear bouncing enough to vibrate some of the rings. So, I nervously/cautiously took the next step of adding rear anchor points.



I haven't driven it yet, but I expect that should work pretty well. I did run into a problem on the first (passenger) side. I had both seat bolts in up front and assumed the uni-strut was in a straight line. I had measured out down below and knew it would hit an open area, but when I drilled through, I landed right alongside the pinch weld. I was much more careful to get it straight on the driver's side, as well as measure to be safely clear of the fuel filler neck.

The steering is significantly better now that the 4-bolt steering box is completed. My steering wheel is off by 90 degrees, which is pretty funky, so an alignment is in order soon. I'm using the radiator's tranny cooler as a PS cooler, since I used an external tranny cooler instead.

I had wired up the temp sensor already in the tranny's test port, figuring there are pros and cons to every location and that's by far the simplest, and have been working on an A-pillar gauge pod:



You don't realize how narrow and shallow our A-pillars are until you try mounting a gauge pod to them! It didn't come out spectacularly well, but that's the end result of a lot of cutting, shaving, and contorting. I would have liked to rotate it more toward the seat for a better viewing angle, but there's just not enough room on the pillar to do so. At least not without cutting a line down the humps of the pod to cheat it that direction on the pillar.

I may still buy the GlowShift pillar replacement setup. I was about to order a single pillar pod, then searched CL to see if there was anything local I wouldn't have to wait for. As luck would have it, there was exactly one listed in town, and it was only a couple blocks away and a mere $5. Worth performing surgery on whether or not it sticks around.

What to do with the other two pods? I've yet to find a factory gauge cluster with the tach, even on M/T's, so I'll probably get a 52mm tach to put in there. I guess I'll have to supercharge the engine and add a boost gauge for the 3rd spot! dash_cam, what was that about project creep? ;)

I got around to sharpshooter's suggestion of testing the TPS, in case that's the cause of what seems like sluggish throttle tip-in to me. First, I followed others' advice and built a patch cable from my old TPS and spare/donor harness, adding a little of my own flair with a spark plug wire separator for ease of keeping the terminals apart:



I went with simple ring terminals instead of alligator clips, as it's easy to slip the multimeter's probes through them and they'll wedge into place. Onto the test results...

0.831V @ throttle closed
4.48V @ WOT
steadily climbs as throttle opens

target:
0.5-1.0V closed
4.0-5.0V WOT

Doesn't get much better than that. Among other things, I'll have to have someone who knows these trucks drive it and see if it's behaving the way it should, and I simply am used to a different feel.

I couldn't get a good picture of it, but I discovered a few weeks back that my heater control white vacuum line at the back corner of the engine bay wasn't just crumbly, but completely rotted out. I spliced in a new section until digging into possible heater/AC replacement.

And finally, after 3 months of trying to give away my rear seat, which was not so stylishly spray painted black by the PO, and getting zero interest, I decided to turn it into a porch couch. No pictures, but you know it's awesome. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #244
I may have figured out why the throttle tip-in felt sluggish. I finally finished up the SixLitre tune-up by setting the timing to go with the upgraded ignition components. To my surprise, the timing on the presumed recently rebuilt '95 engine was 17-18 degrees!

I moved it back to 13-13.5 degrees (a little more than halfway between the 12 and 14 degree marks) and it feels much better. Less delay when pressing the gas pedal, and smoother/quieter idle. (One of the reasons I'd like to have a tach.)

The symptoms don't exactly fit, with too much timing being associated with hard starting and too little with low power, so I'm not entirely sure what to make of that. I've been curious since buying the engine if it was rebuilt to stock specs or if it got the performance treatment. Is there any reason why a hot cam or something would get that much timing, or was it just poorly set by the last person who worked on it?

I took it around the block and the uni-strut D-rings are whisper quiet, as hoped for.
 

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Glad you're getting to enjoy your bronco! (Finally)

I don't know about the timing, but I don't think it would cause any permanent engine damage being that far advanced as long as it wasn't pinging. From what I remember advancing the timing actually shifts the torque curve toward the lower end of the rpm range, giving you more torque down low. That info doesn't really help you much with your problem though.
 

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Discussion Starter #246
Yeah, it doesn't really add up, does it? All I can figure is, too much timing is, well, too much of a good thing and upsets the throttle response.

I just ran across an unrelated concern that I'll have to look into...

the 95 will be sequential fire fuel injectors while the 93 will be batch fire. that means the 95 will have a wire for each fuel injector. the batch fire will only have 2 wires each controlling 4 injectors.
http://www.fullsizebronco.com/forum/6682562-post50.html

My '95 engine's harness had some connectors clipped off, so I used the '92 harness. I had assumed they're identical, other than the IAT/ACT location... Now I'm wondering if the injectors are set to fire like the engine expects. On the other hand, would sequential fire even work with the '95 harness if still using the '92 EEC? There are more variables here than had occurred to me before. :/

On another unrelated note, here's something I started playing with last night that's been on my mind for a while:



Subaru hood scoop placement.



Alignment, hood underside.



Hood underside. That lip is where the bolts would go, if everything lines up right.



Making a template.





Placement with template for better slope visual.



Placement with template for better slope visual. The back edge of the hood cutout would need to come up some.

I've had that scoop sitting around for the past year from another project. I'm still on the fence whether it'll work well on the Bronco, with the main challenges being: a) what to do about the hood's center ridge line, and b) how much work will it take to get the hood height right at the rear of the scoop? Then there's smaller issues like do I even want a rain/debris opening right above the drive belt, and is there enough clearance around the intake tube? I think it'll look fantastic if I can pull it off, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #248
That, too. I saw a few pictures of trucks today, such as 4Runners, with scoops like that and no obvious tie-in to the airbox. I'll take a closer look at the JY next time to see if they're just dummy openings (blanks) or if they're routing off to the side somehow for controlled airflow.

I can't remember for sure if I grabbed the full mounting setup with the Subaru scoop, or if I left that behind figuring it would be of no use and easy to find one later. I might have it stashed away somewhere... I sort of recall it having a blank behind it as part of the mount. Then the question is, is it worth going to all that trouble just for the look? Smaller vents to either side of the center line would make more sense, but wouldn't look as cool.

Edit: From a purely practical standpoint, if I were going to put in a non-functional scoop, something like this would be way simpler, albeit not quite as good looking:

http://www.supermotors.net/registry/9319/27098-2
 

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Discussion Starter #249
I did the much needed ghetto alignment today, playing with the outer tie rod adjustment sleeves to get the steering wheel centered after the E350 steering box left it 90 degrees off. I haven't driven it yet to see if the eyeball and string method got the wheels straight enough.

Edit: I over-corrected. It's off a bit to the other side now -- I guess it's tough to get the wheels truly straight ahead even while suspended, when there's inherent steering slop -- but at least I can see all the gauges unlike before.

That extra safety bracket on the right side that keeps the sleeve from turning is downright annoying. The only thing I could figure out to do with it was to bend it out of place.

I wanted to check on the health of other front end suspension stuff at the same time, going on the advice that most alignment shops won't want to touch the TTB if there are any worn parts. It looks like I need new tie rods, judging from being able to rotate them either way by hand. The right wheel rocks/clicks a tiny bit when using a big pry bar below the tire, but the left is solid. I'm not sure if that's enough to worry about ball joints right now. I'll probably do adjustable caster bushings while I'm at it.

I finally hooked up a trailer last week and did a bit of hauling. It was only 1000-1200 lbs plus the weight of the utility trailer, but the Bronco handled it with ease. I seriously couldn't tell there was anything back there, other than the one time I had to stop fairly abruptly and could tell the braking was weaker than normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #250
I sold the last of the '98 Explorer engine stuff last Fri, then got an inquiry today from someone hoping I still had the block, having been unable to get down here for it a week ago because his truck was dead. I guess he was looking at a saved week-old ad that was deleted right away. It's nice to have that garage space back, and equally nice to have almost broken even now on the two engines. Slowly getting my head back above water on this project...

I decided this evening to go ahead and order a Dorman 34150 A/C bypass pulley instead of searching for an OEM Dayco 101-52502 for who knows how long at the JY (or paying more for NOS). The only non-A/C truck I've seen was a 6-cyl. Hopefully, the Dorman quality is comparable to the Dayco. Most of the negative reviews I've seen appear to be people using it on the wrong engines.

I've got the non-A/C blower box ready to go in, but I don't have whatever R12 is left in the system drained for disconnecting the compressor and leaving it in as a temporary pulley, thus the decision to order the Dorman. I called a few shops and some don't even have R12 equipment, and those who do want to charge for half of an evac/recharge even if I'm not planning on doing the second half and am giving them the Freon for free. I may call around more still, but I should be able to remove the whole A/C system as one sealed unit.

I'm also toying with the idea of using the compressor (or a York) as an OBA setup, although that's probably more complexity than it's worth for my non-off-roading application. A simple power inverter and my 110V portable compressor should be fine if I plan ahead.
 

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Discussion Starter #251
As luck would have it, I found a York 210 compressor today! Ironically, I turned up only one in the whole yard and it was out of the same Ramcharger I bought my spare wheel/tire off of. They had moved it, but fortunately hadn't scrapped it yet.

The pulley spins pretty free, with only a slight metallic rasp, and the clutch works as it should. I won't be using the same pulley, obviously. Of interest, applying ground to the mounting bracket (the York has only a single +12V wire) does nothing, but applying it to the compressor body activates the clutch. It must be the bolts through the bracket, not the bracket itself, that transmit the ground. I'd of thought the bracket would still transmit it, but it might be coated or something.

There are a lot of threads on building an OBA system with a York compressor, but for anyone curious, here's the most thorough resource I've found so far:

Project Jeep CJ-7 - Onboard Air System York AC Compressor Conversion

Edit: Actually, this one may be even better:

http://www.therangerstation.com/tech_library/york_compressor.shtml
 

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Just out of curiosity, what are you going to use the OBA for?

Congrats on your progress so far! Glad you're getting to enjoy it now.
 

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Discussion Starter #253
Just out of curiosity, what are you going to use the OBA for?
Utility. ;)

Who knows... I'm sure it'll get used more than the non-working A/C in a vehicle whose usage will rarely, if ever, require it. And as long as I'm removing the A/C, I might as well add some functionality as a fun little side project.

I almost picked up a project car a while back that had a flat tire or two. It would be handy for that sort of thing. Or just for running some air tools without having to get out the compressor and extension cord.

I have a spare hotdog compressor that might be good for donor parts (tank and regulator), but I haven't looked into the practicality of that approach yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #254
Well, I ran into a bit of a roadblock with the York idea: I can't see any way it'll fit under the K&N intake pipe. Angled to either side or straight up, there's not nearly enough clearance. It seems like the only way to make it work in the stock location is with a flexible intake that can provide more space.

If I proceed with it, I'll probably have to follow @chebbykiller's lead with the smog pump location:

How to: Turn your smog pump location into OBA! - Ford Bronco Forum

Mine is just a gutted pump acting as a pulley currently, so that has some appeal.

By far the biggest negative to that approach is how would you check/add oil? Access would be seemingly impossible without removing it each time. At least that orientation would have it angled such that the suction port is on top for my right hand suction unit, which is what you're supposed to do if not mounting it vertically.

Edit: On the other hand, if modifying chebbykiller's bracket idea and doing a circular cutout in the area of the oil plug on the upper side, maybe it could be made accessible enough.

I found a nice tank option, a Campbell Hausfeld 1ga pancake unit for $22 shipped:

Campbell Hausfeld 1 Gallon Tank Replacement Parts For Vertical Air Compressor | eBay

At 10.7" round x 5.8" high and only 5.4 lbs, it would be a great fit where the vacuum and smog reservoirs used to reside. (No need for either with the modern cat eliminating the need for the thermactor system, and nothing else running off the vacuum reservoir.) Well, it's a bit of a squeeze with the bottle jack there, but with that removed it would be practically OEM. There's a good 5" of height to spare, allowing ample room for connections.
 

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Discussion Starter #256
Never, ever order from Pep Boys through their eBay store! They had a competitive price on the Dorman A/C Bypass Pulley, and along with a smaller item I needed, qualified for free shipping. Unfortunately, they waited an agonizing 8 days to ship it, didn't respond to my inquiry as to what the delay was (but conveniently shipped it the next day), then forgot to include the damn thing despite listing it on the packing slip! I knew as soon as the FedEx guy handed me the featherweight box, that at 7x7x7 probably isn't even big enough to contain the pulley, that it was missing.

I knew it was arriving today, according to the tracking info, so I got the old A/C system and blower box removed. I finished bolting in the new non-A/C box just as the FedEx truck arrived. Perfect timing turned into anything but... I guess I'll have to look for someone local that carries one now, if I don't want the truck to be down for a week. I think one of the AutoZone stores in the area had it listed. (Edit: Nope, no one stocks them locally. Fugg.)

Anyway, here's some before & after pics:



Yep, that's a big crack in the A/C portion of the blower box. That's where I was feeling the air blowing out the bottom.



I ran into one little hiccup in the form of a sizable coolant leak. When I first filled up the cooling system, the heater hose fill/drain junction was dripping coolant, so I tightened up the clamp and it seemed okay. As I was wiggling the old blower box out today, that connection popped loose and sprayed coolant everywhere. The plastic barb was cracked. Sigh. I'm not really sure what that fill/drain port is good for, so I think I'll just put a regular double-ended barb in its place.
 

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I don't think that fill/drain port is stock. Maybe it is on the forest service vehicles, but I don't remember seeing it on any other bronco. That doesn't mean much though. I'd just replace that whole hose with 1 piece of hose or connect the two together.

As far as the a/c pulley, when you bought your other engines, did either of them come with an a/c compressor? If so you could just bolt that compressor in place for now as long as the bearing isn't seized. Then you can straighten out the bypass pulley situation with pep boys and install that pulley when you get a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter #258
No wonder it seemed so useless. :) I actually wondered if that was the case. The only other '92-96 Bronco I've seen up close is the one my engine came out of, and that had pretty much an empty engine bay. All the F-series I've looked at haven't had that fill/drain port.

I just got back from Ace and picked up a couple 5/8" and 3/4" barbs to replace it, perhaps a temporary thing until running a full new hose. Fewer junctions is always better.

Neither of the engines I bought came with the compressor, so I don't have a spare. My original one obviously still works from a free spinning pulley standpoint, but I'd rather not let loose whatever Freon is still in the system. However, as I was buttoning everything up before heading off to Ace, I got to thinking...

1) Purchased A/C bypass pulley.
2) Bought the York compressor. Wasted bypass pulley purchase?
3) York won't fit stock location because of K&N intake pipe, so figured I would try the smog pump location.
4) Pep Boys happened.

Since I don't really need the K&N pipe hooked up, with just an unplugged MAF connected to it while still running Speed Density, I decided I can probably mount up the York before I would get a replacement bypass pulley, so I might as well go that route and put the K&N on the back burner. My new 6-groove clutch/pulley arrived yesterday, which was part of the Ace trip, needing to get a 5/8" coarse thread bolt to remove the old clutch. The 1 ga pancake compressor tank also arrived today, although that's not needed until I actually plumb the York. I'll get some pics up of the tank fitment in a bit.

p.s. You probably can't tell in the photo, but the cap actually does say fill/drain port. The first time I popped the hood, I thought it was an A/C pressure port alongside the receiver/drier.
 

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That port is for flushing your coolant. You screw your radiator hose into it and open the radiator.

I deal with pep boys online ordering for in store pickup. They carry four seasons which is my preferred ac supplier. However, pep boys customer service leaves much to be desired. I can't imagine buying from their ebay store.

Edit: screw in your water hose to the heater hose

 

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Discussion Starter #260
Here's what the 1ga tank looks like:



Plenty of room to make it work with the bottle jack in place.

I ran into another hurdle... The new clutch/pulley, which I was explicitly told would fit the York, has a totally different bolt pattern.

That port is for flushing your coolant. You screw your radiator hose into it and open the radiator.
I was going to say, that's not much different than going straight to the radiator, but then I got the part about it being a hose fitting. I never was able to unscrew the cap to peer inside. It felt like the plastic was fused.

It would be ironic if someone added it for radiator upkeep, given that the radiator was cracked and the cooling system looked like it contained 25 years of coffee and tap water!

I deal with pep boys online ordering for in store pickup. They carry four seasons which is my preferred ac supplier. However, pep boys customer service leaves much to be desired. I can't imagine buying from their ebay store.
I can only assume they're much better in person, otherwise they would never stay in business... We don't have Pep Boys around here, so this was my first (and last) experience with them. While typing this, I got a message from them in response to my open case about the item not being in the package:

"Upon further research on your order, your tracking number states that your order was delivered on Thu 7/27/2017 12:30 pm. We hope this information was of assistance."

Brilliant. :doh0715: Their online division is either incompetent or crooks.
 
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