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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My '94' has a habit of leaving me stranded lately. (last year or so). It's been sitting 3 or 4 months but is cranked regularly and driven around the property.

I need to fix it and my first way to do that, is to see if someone lives in my neck of the woods...MS. If that doesn't work I suppose I need a list of what to test and rule out as the problem(s).

I've replaced the distributor, plugs, wires and cap, TPS sensor, ignition coil 2 times, (because the fins had gotten rusty which may or may not be a problem) replaced some vacuum lines, in line (along frame rail) fuel filter, checked fuel pressure which fell w/in specs. ground connections and some other non related repairs.

Currently, if I leave my battery connected, it will be dead in the morning, which is new.
To get any codes, it will have to be running when the problem happens and it doesn't seem to appear when it's just idling.

After driving it 15 to 20 mins. on the road, it will start running rough almost like it's not getting any fuel and then die.
After 20 to 45 mins. (varies) it will crank up and run fine and then start running rough again and then die...that's why I thought the fuel pressure might be an issue and it might be but when I checked it, the readings were fine.

I've called a number of shops and the story is the same, "we don't have anyone who can work on that year model" which I felt would be the response but had to try that first so I wouldn't be looking back over my should wishing I had.

So that's a summary of what I'm trying to fix, appreciate any comments and or advice. Thanks
 

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1996 EB 5.8L, E4OD, 2.5" RC Lift, 33" tires, 3.55 gears
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136 Posts
Someone more knowledgable will be along I’m sure but it kind of sounds like a bad ICM. Might be crapping out on you when it gets hot which explains why it fires right back up after it cools down for 30-45 mins. Just my .02.

Adam
 

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aka: kemicalburns
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may also be your computer at this point.
 
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Charlie don't surf..
'92 Ford Bronco XLT
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Hey @leatherneck , have you checked for codes yet? Even if it's not running or stalls out, you'll still be able to pull whatever is in memory and that will help with the trouble shooting.

I wouldn't rule out the EEC just yet, but from the sound of things you might have a fueling issue, or your pump could be starting to fail. It would be worth checking your fuel pressure when you get a chance. Let us know what you find.
 
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Yo leatherneck,
"To get any codes, it will have to be running when the problem happens and it doesn't seem to appear when it's just idling."
Excuse my confusion (great grandchildren are wanting to go fishing), have you run a code test after it runs rough and when engine dies?

As Jermil advised, try this Self Test for Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC)s by my pal, BroncoJoe19 @ Code Reader
Do at least the KOEO, because "The computer will tell you what it found out by testing your sensors, and also any stored information it saved from anything that went wrong during the last 40 trips to the store."

Battery Drainer Suspects;
Battery isn’t charging while you drive.
Underhood lamp is always on, if equipped.
Headlight Switch. CORROSION;
Switch Fires, Part Number SW-2103: "...Over the past two years, this office has experienced fires caused by another potential problem in Ford vehicles. The problem exists within the dimmer portion of the headlight switch in Ford vehicles. The light switch involved is a Model SW-2103. These are the pull out type headlight switches usually located in the lower left corner of the front dash of Ford vehicles. The headlight portion of the switch has two pullout positions, the first for parking lights only, and fully out for headlights and parking lights. The shaft of this pull-out light switch can be turned clockwise and counterclockwise which activates a dimmer switch, lowering and raising the intensity of the lighting in the instrument panels respectively. Fully rotating the shaft counterclockwise past a notch activates the interior lights within the vehicles. The potential problem exists within the dimmer portion of this switch. The dimmer mechanism consists of a metallic resistive coil set inside a ceramic disc positioned over the shaft of the switch. The coil is exposed on its front side away from the passenger compartment. The front side of the coil passes across a contact permitting a current to flow through a certain portion of the coil when the switch is pulled our in its first or second positions. The greater amount of coil through which the current is permitted to pass (clockwise most position) creates the greatest resistance and therefore dims the dash lighting to its lowest intensity. The opposite position provides greatest intensity. Through our investigations, we have found that the coil can fail owing to wear and/or possible material defects or damage. A fractured coil can maneuver itself free of the ceramic disc permitting it to come in contact with the metal bracket which mounts and grounds the switch to the vehicle. When this occurs, a current can flow through a portion of the coil creating high temperatures melting the metal material of the coil and possibly igniting surrounding combustibles. This mechanism has been observed in three separate incidents by this office. Two of these resulted in a fire. The mechanism is precipitated by wear and/or defect in the coil mechanism. If the former is true, we expect there will be an increase in fires caused through this mechanism given an increase in service time. To this date the problem appears to be somewhat limited. However, this particular light switch has been utilized in numerous Ford vehicles. Therefore, a small increase in failure rate owing to age and wear could result in a significant increase in fire losses. The SW-2103 Light Switch Assembly discussed above is reportedly installed in the following Ford vehicles: 1986 -1997 F100, F150, F300; 1990-1994 Explorer; 1987-1994 Ranger; 1987-1990 Bronco II; 1992-1997 Aerostar..." Miesk5 NOTE: No Bronco Listed, but this may be the result of typos or incomplete research by the company.
Source: by waltersforensic.com
See:


Loose or Weak Contact at Generator Harness Connector TSB 96-21-4 for 86-93 Bronco
Source: by Ford
"ISSUE: When a generator fails, there are a few failure modes that may cause heat to be produced at the wiring harness-to-generator connector. This excess heat may damage the female terminals on the wiring harness, resulting in increased resistance. The increased resistance produces more heat. When the generator is replaced, the resistance produced by a damaged connector may damage the new generator and could result in a repeat repair, including installation of another generator. High resistance (caused by a damaged connector) will not go away until the damaged connector is replaced.
ACTION: Visually inspect the harness-to-generator connector for damage (heat, corrosion, distortion and cracking) before installing a new generator. Install the Generator Wiring Harness Connector Kit (E5AZ-14305-AA) if the harness-to-generator connector is damaged.
The Generator Wiring Harness Connector Kit (E5AZ-14305-AA) contains the following:
One (1) Red Wire Butt Connector
Two (2) Yellow Wire Butt Connectors
One (1) Wire Connector Assembly
One (1) Instruction Sheet (I.S. 6849)
PART NUMBER PART NAME
E5AZ-14305-AA Generator Wiring Harness Connector Kit
OTHER APPLICABLE ARTICLES: NONE
SUPERSEDES: 95-25-04"

Parasitic Current Drain Test; "...you should be able to trace the "parasitic draw" on the battery in the normal way. Pull the (-) cable off & put an ammeter inline set to the 10A range (or higher if possible) to see how much current is being pulled out of the battery with the key OFF, the doors SHUT, & the hood light bulb REMOVED. Make sure absolutely NOTHING is turned on anywhere on the truck. If it registers 0 or below the meter's next range, switch it down a range until it shows some useful numbers. If it ends up being below 0.5A (500mA), then replace the battery. If it's above that, start by disconnecting all the alternator wires & see if the reading drops under 0.5A. Then move to the fuse block & pull them 1 at a time until there's a significant drop in the reading. That's the circuit that's draining the battery. Follow it to find the problem..."

BATTERY DOES NOT HOLD A CHARGE
L1 CHECK BATTERY CONNECTIONS

  • Inspect the battery cables for loose or corroded connections, especially those negative cable grounds.
Are the battery cables clean and tight?
YesNo
GO to L2.CLEAN AND TIGHTEN the battery cables.
L2 CHECK DRIVE BELT TENSION
  • Tight?

YesNo
GO to L3.ADJUST or REPLACE the drive belt.
L3 LOOSE BATTERY POST
  • Check for loose battery posts.
Are posts OK?
YesNo
GO to L4.REPLACE battery.
L4 CRACKED BATTERY COVER
  • Remove battery hold down clamps and shields.
  • Check for broken/cracked case or battery cover.
Are case and cover OK?
YesNo
GO to L5.REPLACE battery.
L5 CHECK BATTERY
  • Perform the battery capacity test at local parts store.
Is battery OK?
YesNo
GO to L6.REPLACE the battery.
L6 CHECK FOR KEY-OFF DRAIN
  • Have parts store perform battery drain test.
Is correct drain less than 50 Ma (or test lamp off)?
YesNo
Battery is ok!Find the cause of key-off battery drain.

183877

183878
183879
183880
183881
183882
183883
183884

Ignore Scope for now and maybe never to save $.
Quick Test is Self Test.
Fuel pressure is ok, but injectors may need to be tested, but not now until other other No $ tests are done.
EGR: Test; "...Engine running, so be careful and use proper care! Find the EGR valve and disconnect the vacuum line going to the top of the EVP. There should be no vacuum there at this time. If there is then check for proper EVR (EGR vacuum regulator) operation and vacuum line routing. Repair and continue testing. Hook up your hand vacuum pump to the EGR valve and slowly apply a vacuum. If the EGR valve is functioning then the engine should begin to run poorly and stumble. If you apply full vacuum and notice no RPM change or can’t pull a vacuum at all, then check for a faulty diaphragm in the valve or a restriction of the EGR tube, exhaust or intake manifold EGR ports. I have run across many concerns where the EGR passages in the intake manifolds become plugged with carbon and prevent EGR flow, so try to keep this in mind during testing. Repair and continue testing..." by engine-light-help.com
Vacuum Leaks: I understand that you repaired some hoses.
See my Vacuum leak test in my post #11 (includes jowens1126 HVAC Control Panel info @ Help with dtc codes and idle
Excerpt; When vacuum leaks are indicated, search out and correct the condition. Excess air leaking into the system will upset the fuel mixture and cause conditions such as rough idle, missing on acceleration, or burned valves. If the leak exists in an accessory unit, such as the power brake, the unit will not function correctly. Or Air Conditioning when in MAX mode may switch to Defrost.
ISC-BPA is Idle Air Control (IAC): Idle or Stalling Problems & Troubleshooting; "...The IAC is a cylindrical unit attached to the upper intake manifold. This unit electrically controlled by the computer, and allows air to flow into the intake at idle, bypassing the throttle plate. The extra air is accompanied by extra fuel to bring the idle up to proper speed, and when cold, allows a high idle condition. These units may become dirty, and need cleaning. Many idle and stalling issues tend to be blamed on these units. Cleaning is achieved by removing the electrical connector, and two screws holding it on. Once off of the vehicle, clean with throttle body cleaner (or a good carburetor cleaner). Continue cleaning until unit is clean, like new; reinstall unit. This is also a good time to clean the intake, and EGR ports (if applicable). Testing may be achieved by bringing the engine to operating temperature, noting the idle speed (should be within spec). Unplug the unit’s electrical connector, and the idle should drop to about 650 RPM. When the unit is reinstalled, it should return to normal idle speed. If the vehicle does not idle at proper RPM (too low), there are no vacuum leaks, and the TPS calibration is correct, than the unit is most likely fault..." by Ford
See How to Clean and Test your IAC by Seattle FSB @ How to Clean and Test your IAC
183885

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you everyone for the replies...I'll be working on all that was suggested and will keep you informed as I check and eliminate each item.

I'm going to start w/ the codes and meisk, the Headlight switch could be my battery drain issue.
I always use my lights when driving and the battery is almost new, so glad you mentioned the potential switch problems.

Charles
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Tried to pull codes today based on what I read to refresh my memory for the procedure.
This method was to use the test receptacle on Driver side fender and insert a paper clip end into right side top to the single test connector in the same harness. (Picture 1)

Last time I did this, I thought the connector in Picture 2 was involved some way.

The blinks for engine size didn't flash (4 for V-8) or the prompt (single quick flash) to turn steering wheel R & L, depress brake and accelerate to 2K RPM's.

Picture 3 is my ign. coil and you can see how rusted the fins are. This is the 3rd one I have replaced with 2 due to the rust build up...is this normal?

I received 1 code - 32, which 4th Picture shows EVP and is relatively new.

Charles
 

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Yo Charles,
2 Digit to 3 Digit "...Ford went from two-digit to three-digit EEC IV Self-Test codes in 1991 to service the increasing number of service codes required to support various government On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) regulations. The phase-in from two-digit to three-digit codes started in the 1991 model year. 1996 Broncos have OBD II that has 3-4 numbers beginning with a Letter; usually a P..."

Try this Self Test for Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC)s by my pal, BroncoJoe19 @ Code Reader
The engine temperature must be greater than 50° F for the Key On Engine Off (KOEO) Self-Test and greater than 180° F for the Key On Engine Running (KOER) Self-Test. Run it around to heat the engine up and shift thru all gears including Reverse. Make sure A/C is off and transmission is in Park (automatic); or in Neutral for a Manual & release clutch. Then turn off engine, all accessories/lights (close driver's door) , etc.

Do KOEO test First. Post Code(s) here according to KOEO & KOER.
A helper can assist you by counting the codes. Some use their smart phones to record them.

BEWARE OF FAN, BELTS, PULLEYS, HOT HOSES, IGNITION HIGH TENSION WIRES, AND ENGINE COMPONENTS

Or ask local mom and dad parts stores if they will test it for you.
Or purchase a coder reader such as Equus 3145 Innova OBD 1 Code Reader for Ford EEC IV Engines at Walmart & most parts stores.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yo Charles,
2 Digit to 3 Digit "...Ford went from two-digit to three-digit EEC IV Self-Test codes in 1991 to service the increasing number of service codes required to support various government On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) regulations. The phase-in from two-digit to three-digit codes started in the 1991 model year. 1996 Broncos have OBD II that has 3-4 numbers beginning with a Letter; usually a P..."


Thank you miesk for clarifying this...my internet has been down due to Ida but has been restored this morning.

I did do the KOER test but looking at your photo of the test receptacle, my paper clip was in the wrong pin/slot. I had it in 'SRG' and it should have been in the 'STO' correct?

I'll try the KOEO test today. A couple years back, I did take it to a 'Chain Auto Parts' but they didn't have the OBD 1 scanner...I'll have to rack my brain and see if I can think of someone who might have one around here. I called numerous shops last week who said they couldn't work on it so I'll have to assume they wouldn't have the OBD 1 scanner (for Ford) either.

Did notice in my research that there is an OBD I to OBD II adapter available...not sure if it's new
or been around a while.

Charles
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Was reading Steve 83 link about Self test and I did have the jumpers in the correct position...STI to SIG return...

To detect errors during Key On Engine Off Self-Test, the fault must be present at the time of testing.

(same link) I will have to run it until it starts to stumble as it has done in the past, to get the code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If I drive down the road to cause the malfunction to manifest and able to turn the engine off, install clip and restart to read codes, would I be able to desconnect the battery...clearing codes and make it back home?
 

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Yo leatherneck
EEC tested sensors, and also any stored information it saved from anything that went wrong during the last 40 trips.
Let's see if three digit codes are shown before disconnecting battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
miesk,the only code I'm getting is 32 which I've addressed....it idles fine w/o stumbling.
I think it needs to be driven down the road in order to create the symptoms and then I should be able to receive the code. Do the KOEO w/ paper clip, run test, remove p/c and disconnect battery, to clear codes in order for it to crank and drive back home.
In order to drive it, more than likely going to leave me stranded; that's why I was wondering if I disconnected the battery, would it clear that code and allow me to drive it back home?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Parasitic battery test is almost 7amps draw. Removed Alt. hook up{s} and down to 2.5 amp draw.
I thought I had disabled door/courtesy light by closing latch but it resulted in about 2.3 amp draw so down to about 1/2 amp draw.

Now I need to determine whether it's the Alt. or wiring feeding it, grounding somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Update on my original post...had a few side posts on parasitic drain and replaced the alternator
which dropped the parasitic drain within acceptable limits.

That alone improved the running but after 30 + miles, it showed some signs of hesitation.
I did a longer trip Wednesday (40 miles) and it seemed a little worse. Same day talked to someone who has an 81 Bronco and he looked at mine and mentioned the EGR (as did meisk/AL) which reminded me when I replaced the EGR, the tube was not as long as the original.
Read several threads and decided to braze the gap and then hooked it back up to exhaust manifold and bottom of EGR body. It's possible I didn't do well enough brazing job although I've checked for air leakage numerous times.

That might be my issue...applied some muffler paste on that joint to see if it makes a difference
so will know today or tomorrow. Also, w/ parasitic drain resolved, I don't have to disconnect the battery and lose my codes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Ran a 50 + mile journey, 25 miles then stop of over an hour and then 25 back...had some rough idling cold then ran fine. Same on return but rougher running on the last part of it..

Did KOEO and Key On Engine Running self diagnostic tests and the only code is 32, so I'll replace the EVP (EGR Valve Position Sensor)
Toggleand see what happens. Something else I've noticed is, while driving, the 32 code is blinking/flashing in the same location as when doing the self test.
 

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2014 Ford Explorer Sport
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A 1994 model year Bronco/F-Series should display three digit codes.
 
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