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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,
I read thru many of the threads about this issue and have some new ideas but want your current thoughts also.

1995 Bronco XLT 5.8L 351W:
Newly installed:
-3 Row Aluminum Radiator
-Had installed 2 12" fans at 1730 cfm each BUT changed out to 2 12" fans at 2150 cfm (thought that would help)
-Coolant temp switch
-radiator hoses
-water neck flange
-condenser
-compressor
-dryer
-schrader valve X 2
-ac clutch cycle switch
-evap coil
-orifice X 2
-water pump
-idler pulley
Radiator hoses are not collapsing.

Any ideas as to why it is running hot would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Make sure your heater hoses are not hooked up backwards yes it matters.... happened to me drove me nuts I could not figure it out..... finally took it to a shop and vuala! Thats what the issue was.

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1- make sure it really is running hot and not your factory gauge. Use an infrared thermometer to get a ballpark.

2- by hot - what do you mean? It hits the 'l' of normal and stays there? It's ok until you tow or climb a hill?

3- double check your thermostat is not installed backwards. Been there and done that.

4- how hot is the heater air?

My stock motor with nothing but a solid aluminum radiator and stock fan runs on the cool side of normal (about the 'o') even when towing the camp trailer.

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Grandson bought a 96 F150 5.0 that had a new water pump installed 400 miles earlier. Was overheating, no heat out of the heater. The garage diagnosed it as possible head gasket. It turned out the rebuilt water pumps impeller was slipping on the shaft. Low to no coolant circulation.
 

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wouldn't a backwards thermostat make it run cold?
Nope, hot. The pellet doesn't get the heated water from the motor on it so the temp gauge goes up until the entire thermostat body finally gets hot enough to move the spring. Has to hear through indirect transfer.

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Basically it takes a lot longer to finally open and in the meantime the engine/guage get hotter and hotter.

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Yo Andrea,
From 1996 Bronco Workshop Manual by Ford, same for your 95;
  • Engine Overheats
  • Damaged water thermostat.
  • Damaged water pump.
  • Cooling fan inoperative.
  • Plugged radiator.
 

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95 5.8L MAF XLT, Hedman Shorties/MF SS Y & Muff, E4OD, Man hubs, KYB Quads, 31x10.5x15, 304K miles
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@ADPoppen it would help if you could give more info on your running hot condition, as in when it runs hot, under what conditions, how long from startup does it take to get hot? How are you confirming it is hot? etc!!!! The more info the better we can answer your question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It is on the O then when excelerating or stop and go (this is on surface streets or when on highway) then it begins to get hotter and does not go back down. Today, he drove it to an auto parts store and by the time he got back the recovery was bubbling over. Not many hills directly around us to test if it will run hot but it probably would.
Heater hoses were checked, they were on right.

However, just found the top radiator hose collapsed...WHY???? he is asking...he wants to know what would cause that to collapse
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So he put Thermocure into the system and sitting in the truck and letting it idle. It had got to the M in Normal. He started to hear water running, got out to look and water was pouring out from behind the passenger (rear) side motor mount. Does anyone have a diagram of a motor mount layout?
And any ideas???
 

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Yo Andrea,
It's probably a rusted freeze plug.
Replacement; There are ~8 freeze plugs (and a few bore plugs that look identical) in a V8 block, plus 1 in each end of each head.
Yardape said in same thread; Ive done it that way before, undo the mount on the side you are working, lift the engine a bit. The remove the motor mount from the block and your set. To really make your life easier you can remove the exhaust manifold.
crazyhorse85 wrote; Most of the time you won't have to pull the engine....Like yardape was sayin i've changed mine with it still sitting in the truck.....Take the manifold or header loose and loosen the mount jack her up alittle remove the mount and there should be enough room to operate....One suggestion replace with brass freeze plugs they last alot longer and don't corriode as bad or fast as steel.....And don't let autozone try to talk you into the rubber expandable one they don't work worth a crap....

Source: by members at Ford Bronco Zone Forums

Replacement; "...The one behind the engine mount is gonna be a huge pain to do without pulling or at least lifting the motor. Go in from the bottom, after draining the water in the radiator, drain the block as well, or just pop the plug and be ready to get hosed. A screw driver or punch to knock it sideways so you can grab it with pliers is the picture purfect way to do it, but its between the engine and the mount so I really doubt your gonna be able to do it. Once you do get all of it out install by taking a socket a little smaller then the plug, some RTV around the edge, and tap her home..."
Source: by 81Bronk36 (1BadBronco, Matt K)
 

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Yo,
Following from Automobile Repair Reference Center (ARRC):
"...
  1. Engine Cooling
  2. Freeze Plugs (Core Hole Plugs) aka Freeze Plugs
  3. Removal & Installation

Removal & Installation
Core plugs and installation tools

Core plugs and installation tools
Using a punch and hammer, the freeze plug can be loosened in the block

Using a punch and hammer, the freeze plug can be loosened in the block
Once the freeze plug has been loosened, it can be removed from the block

Once the freeze plug has been loosened, it can be removed from the block
Core plugs need replacement only if they are found to be leaking, are excessively rusty, have popped due to freezing or, if the engine is being overhauled.
If the plugs are accessible with the engine in the truck, they can be removed as-is. If not, the engine will have to be removed.
  1. If necessary, remove the engine and mount it on a work stand. If the engine is being left in the truck, drain the engine coolant and engine oil

CAUTION
The EPA warns that prolonged contact with used engine oil may cause a number of skin disorders, including cancer! You should make every effort to minimize your exposure to used engine oil. Protective gloves should be worn when changing the oil. Wash your hands and any other exposed skin areas as soon as possible after exposure to used engine oil. Soap and water, or waterless hand cleaner should be used.

  1. Remove anything blocking access to the plug or plugs to be replaced.
  2. Drill or center-punch a hole in the plug. For large plugs, drill a 1/2 in. hole; for small plugs, drill a 1/4 in. hole.
  3. For large plugs, using a slide-hammer, thread a machine screw adapter or insert 2-jawed puller adapter into the hole in the plug. Pull the plug from the block; for small plugs, pry the plug out with a pin punch.
  4. Thoroughly clean the opening in the block, using steel wool or emery paper to polish the hole rim.
  5. Coat the outer diameter of the new plug with sealer and place it in the hole:
    • For cup-type core plugs: These plugs are installed with the flanged end outward. The maximum diameter of this type of plug is located at the outer edge of the flange. Carefully and evenly, drive the new plug into place.
    • For expansion-type plugs: These plugs are installed with the flanged end inward. The maximum diameter of this type of plug is located at the base of the flange.

WARNING
It is imperative that the correct type of installation tool is used with the expansion-type of plug. Under no circumstances is this type of plug to be driven in using a tool that contacts the crowned portion of the plug. Driving in this plug incorrectly will cause the plug to expand prior to installation. When installed, the trailing (maximum) diameter of the plug MUST be below the chamfered edge of the bore to create an effective seal. If the core plug replacing tool has a depth seating surface, do not seat the tool against a non-machined (casting) surface.

  1. Install any removed parts and, if applicable, install the engine in the truck.
  2. Refill the cooling system and crankcase.
  3. Start the engine and check for leaks."
 

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ADP, hoses can simply get old and fail/collapse.

replace the hose, and start looking around the block and heads for cracks. Pray that all you find is a blown freeze plug. then replace it. put a pressure gauge on the cooling system to check it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
ADP, hoses can simply get old and fail/collapse.

replace the hose, and start looking around the block and heads for cracks. Pray that all you find is a blown freeze plug. then replace it. put a pressure gauge on the cooling system to check it.
Hoses are all new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Aimed a infrared gun at parts, what should the temp be?

Freeze plugs are probably going to be done then after we are done with 115 degree temps here in Phoenix.
 

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Hoses are all new.
generally, a new hose shouldn't fail. it might if it pulls a vacuum, which if there is enough stuff wrong with the cooling system it could as it cools down.

I think right now before anything y'all need to get in there with a flashlight and check on all the freeze plugs, if they are all there, top the radiator off and run it while looking for leaks. once it reaches operating temps, shut it down and restart after it cools off again. don't overheat it checking for whatever is causing it to overheat.
 
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