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Discussion Starter #1
Replaced the water pump and while doing a back flush, things seem ok until i turn on the A/C.
Loud squeeking noise and smoke coming out of the passanger's side near the firewall and now the A/C is dead. I didn't look closer as i'm afraid something is gonna explode.
It has to be some moving parts that is jammed or broken and i believe the only moving part would be the blower.
I disscounect this connector and no more squeeking noise/smoke but when i turn on the A/C i get only hot air. That brings me to the conclusion that blower was not the fault as i'm getting air in the cabin.

One end of the connector goes into the firewall and the other goes to the battery.


Appreciate if someone can help me narrow down the culprit.......compressor, condenser, evaoporator, orfice, blower or anything else?:beer

Thx in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Just removed the blower and connect directly to d battery and it works just fine.

Tried again, let the truck running to normal operation temp, turn on heater to max.....no problem, but when i turn on A/C to max, i see smoke with some funny smell, this time i noticed coming from middle of the engine bay and upon checking, it looks like is coming from the compressor.

Look at the below pic, connector is wet.


Can someone tell me what is the thing with the arrow? Can it be like a release valve?


Please help.
Thx.
 

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well if you had a squealing noise, unplugged your blower and it went away when you still had the A/C on, then your blower must be bad, which is prolly the cheapest fix you could hope for A/C wise... with blower unplugged, you should only get air oozing out of your vents, which I would think would be cool, but maybe not. check your A/C hoses for a hole, might have busted one and that was your freon you saw venting out... Could even be a coolant line that busted going to your heater core since you just replaced your water pump and you saw steam... Worst case is it is the compressor, the clutch is probably out and you are smoking your belt... look for severe wear and tear on you belt... when my A/C compressor went out I popped the hood and the compressor clutch was throwing sparks... I cut the belt(A/C to crank acc. belt only, cant do this with serpentine) so that it didnt snap and do some other damage, like take out transmission cooler lines like my buddys jeep did...if it is the compressor and you have a serpentine belt (one belt for all accessories), go buy you an A/C delete belt and put that on before you get stranded (if this is a daily driver) and can get it fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thx Crash, i have eliminated the blower as the cause, any thoughts on the compressor?
 

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ya its probly the compressor. to check this the easy way is to have the truck OFF and try to turn the clutch portin of the compressor pulley if it spins then the clutch is probly ok, now withe belt off and the key turned on/motor OFF have the a/c switched on in the truck and try to spin it again it should turn with some effort. like turning a small pump by hand. but if it dont turn around completely and smoothly then the compressor is probly shot.:beer
 

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ah I posted while you were posting... what is the smell like? sweet? then it might be coolant which might be the cause of the wet stuff you have a pic of there... if truck is getting close to oveheating or is overheating then you may not get cold air from a/c, I had that happen on other vehicles.. do you see anything spraying or misting with hood up engine running? if it smell burnt then it is prolly the compressor... which to me doesnt explain why you have wet parts under the hood though... could be more than one problem here... the thing is you just replaced the water pump which is what leads me to belive this is coolant related and not just happenstance with your A/C... cant really tell what the arrow is pointing at but what does it trace back to? Is that the high side of the A/C? I cant tell but it doesnt look threaded to me so it probably is not... there is a coolant line that is in the vicinity of the throttle body is that it? how close is that to the water pump? are you getting any coolant drips from around water pump?
 

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ok just went out and looked at mine and found out what I was looking at, that is on the back of the compressor (forgive me I just bought mine and just put the motor in it) that very well could be a vent for the a/c system which if your compressor is bad and is getting very hot would explain the wet spot from pressure build up and discharge... if the wetness feels oily, then this is exactly what it is...
 

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Im not sure the cutoff year from r-12 to r-134a but it was around 92ish, if compressor is bad now is the perfect time to convert to r-134a as r-12 is more expensive and cannot be bought by a do-it yourselfer...
 

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The F-series/Bronco switch over to R-134 was ~1994. R-12 is available and in relatively decent supply and price. You can take an online test to get an EPA609 certificate, from there you can purchase your own R-12. Correctly converting to R-134 is going to cost $$. In the case of this OP, you compressor has probably expired and sent all kinds of debris into the system. At the very minimum you are going to need a new compressor, receiver/drier, orifice tube and a good supply of a/c system cleaner/flush. If you want to go with R-134 after the rebuild I would suggest replacing your lines and condenser with one designed for use with R-134
 

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The F-series/Bronco switch over to R-134 was ~1994. R-12 is available and in relatively decent supply and price. You can take an online test to get an EPA609 certificate, from there you can purchase your own R-12. Correctly converting to R-134 is going to cost $$. In the case of this OP, you compressor has probably expired and sent all kinds of debris into the system. At the very minimum you are going to need a new compressor, receiver/drier, orifice tube and a good supply of a/c system cleaner/flush. If you want to go with R-134 after the rebuild I would suggest replacing your lines and condenser with one designed for use with R-134
hmmm I didnt know it was that easy... but once you get your certificate you are probably held to a different kind of standards such as proper handling of r-12 and one big ass fine if you are releasing it to atmosphere? R-12 does cool better IMHO... my dad had his 1980 bonneville diesel blowing 34*f mid summer after replacing a compressor... man that was cold air! I cant get close to that with r-134a.
 

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If you take the vehicle to a shop for evacuation, you are good to go whether it is R-134 or R-12. I am not a big fan of the backyard or "half-a**ed" kits available for conversion from R-12 to R-134. Too many variables to deal with. Do it right the first time if you want to convert or stick with R-12 or one of the drop in replacements.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank ya for all the comments.

I just check the truck and it seems that the smoke was more like an oil rather than gas as the connector is still oily.

Like most have mentioned, the compressor is prob shot and sending all kind of debris into the system. I might have to get professional help to do the conversion than having a half fk job.

How do i know if i have a compressor with clutch or without?
 

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Thank ya for all the comments.

I just check the truck and it seems that the smoke was more like an oil rather than gas as the connector is still oily.

Like most have mentioned, the compressor is prob shot and sending all kind of debris into the system. I might have to get professional help to do the conversion than having a half fk job.

How do i know if i have a compressor with clutch or without?
the "smoke" was freon gas, the oil is from the system as you have to add oil as well to keep the compressor lubricated... its not just freon... all a/c compressors have a clutch... you can hear when it cycles on and off(when working normally)... it does that as (if it ran all the time its because you are low/out of freon) it builds enough pressure to cycle the freon thru the system... if it ran all the time it would pressure up and blow out the weakest part of the system either a hose or connection...

its not the easiest thing to do but its definitely doable for someone with basic knowledge and some special tools... if you dont have them maybe a friend of yours might... you need a set of gauges and the proper hosesalso a vacuum pump... the two conversions I helped with as A/C work was my dads specialty, was change of compressor, in both cases this was the problem, change the orifice, R-134a uses green orings, r-12 was black, and vacuum out the system completely as they use a different oil OR because the oil is contaminated, not sure which... there HAS to be some litereature on the internet about this conversion that will have an indepth procedure... you can do it.. just dont take short cuts... one of the two cars we did was sold long ago but the other one is still functioning beautifully for over two years meow....

one reason these things fail is because of non use... you need to run the a/c at least once a month if not more to keep compressor and seals lubricated properly... this isnt a problem for me as Im a sweat hog, but im sure in the places where you have a real winter that they could go awhile without being used...
 

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Thank ya for all the comments.

I just check the truck and it seems that the smoke was more like an oil rather than gas as the connector is still oily.

Like most have mentioned, the compressor is prob shot and sending all kind of debris into the system. I might have to get professional help to do the conversion than having a half fk job.

How do i know if i have a compressor with clutch or without?
all automotive compressors have clutches thats how they engage/disengage.
but whether yours is bad or not dunno, but most new ones come with it.
 

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ive never bought a compressor that didnt have the clutch attached to it...
 

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There are plenty of success and horror stories related to R-12 to R-134 conversions. The oil used in R-134 is not compatible with the oil used in R-12 systems. The issue becomes whether or not you are successful in flushing out all the old oil before starting the conversion. Oil tends to saturate the lines themselves. Then there is the issue of the smaller molecules of R-134. Without barrier hoses R-134 tends to leak out much faster with non-barrier hoses the older R-12 systems came with. I am not sure when Ford started using barrier hoses. I assume it was when they switched over to R-134?

For every success story there is usually an equal number, or more, of failures. When I had to make a decision of which refrigerant to use on several older vehicles I own I used AutoFrost. It's listed as a drop in replacement for R-12. It probably has as much controversy as converting to R-134, but it does work well in my '92 F350 and an old Merkur XR4Ti I rebuilt several years ago. If I was to do it again I would look at Freeze12 or Dura-Cool. If for some reason I was forced to use R-134 I would invest in a custom parallel flow condenser, custom hoses and a compatible fixed orifice tube (red in color).
 

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hey rla2005 Im not doubting you, you obviously have more knowledge on the subject than I do, Im just sayin Ive done it twice with success and it wasnt that hard... an 82 suburban and a 93 mustang...
 

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No worries hear Crash. I am reporting the good, the bad and the ugly of R-12 to R-134 conversions. I am glad to hear your two experiences were pleasant. :beer
 

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of course now you might have jinxed me and my bronco when it comes time for that! Im holding you personally reponsible for any trouble I have in that process! hehehe... actually i pulled all parts from motor donor vehicle that was still working and was goin to just have it charged with r-12... no need to change what aint broke yet...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
ya its probly the compressor. to check this the easy way is to have the truck OFF and try to turn the clutch portin of the compressor pulley if it spins then the clutch is probly ok, now withe belt off and the key turned on/motor OFF have the a/c switched on in the truck and try to spin it again it should turn with some effort. like turning a small pump by hand. but if it dont turn around completely and smoothly then the compressor is probly shot.:beer
the "smoke" was freon gas, the oil is from the system as you have to add oil as well to keep the compressor lubricated... its not just freon... all a/c compressors have a clutch... you can hear when it cycles on and off(when working normally)... it does that as (if it ran all the time its because you are low/out of freon) it builds enough pressure to cycle the freon thru the system... if it ran all the time it would pressure up and blow out the weakest part of the system either a hose or connection...

its not the easiest thing to do but its definitely doable for someone with basic knowledge and some special tools... if you dont have them maybe a friend of yours might... you need a set of gauges and the proper hosesalso a vacuum pump... the two conversions I helped with as A/C work was my dads specialty, was change of compressor, in both cases this was the problem, change the orifice, R-134a uses green orings, r-12 was black, and vacuum out the system completely as they use a different oil OR because the oil is contaminated, not sure which... there HAS to be some litereature on the internet about this conversion that will have an indepth procedure... you can do it.. just dont take short cuts... one of the two cars we did was sold long ago but the other one is still functioning beautifully for over two years meow....

one reason these things fail is because of non use... you need to run the a/c at least once a month if not more to keep compressor and seals lubricated properly... this isnt a problem for me as Im a sweat hog, but im sure in the places where you have a real winter that they could go awhile without being used...
Check the compressor pulley and well as the clutch and they spin just fine.
I think the problem may be truck has not been driven for more than a year, thus causing issue with the AC system.
Anyhow, i'm gonna try doing the R134A swap if i manage to gather more info.

Thx all for all the help.:beer
 
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