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ABS off road sucks. Plain and simple. Every vehicle ive driven off road equipped with ABS could barely stop, including my current Bronco (which is my 4th Ford truck). The jeep, both nissans and a variety of cars were all the same. Engineers can dream up what they want and for the most part it works. Brakes and going through the desert, downhill, sand, etc do not warrant ABS. And steve, i respect and value your input on most things, this is one subject ill strongly disagree with you on though. On top of the, not all wheeling is done below 5mph...
 

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Every vehicle ive driven off road equipped with ABS could barely stop...
...a variety of cars...
:rolleyes: So you've decided that ABS is to blame for cars not being able to stop off road? :scratchhe Obviously I wasn't there, but I'd blame the tires, the suspension, the lack of 4WD, the poor ground clearance, and the loose nut behind the wheel. :shrug

:histerica
...not all wheeling is done below 5mph...
We weren't talking about "all wheeling". We were only talking about the specific case of attempting to descend a muddy hill with some degree of control. If you know you're headed for that, and you're going faster than 5mph... ;) ...again: don't blame the ABS for your problems. :thumbup
 

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:histericaWe weren't talking about "all wheeling". We were only talking about the specific case of attempting to descend a muddy hill with some degree of control. If you know you're headed for that, and you're going faster than 5mph... ;) ...again: don't blame the ABS for your problems. :thumbup
Yes but on a decent down a muddy hill as soon as you start to slide you will go over the 5mph mark and again the FAWKING brakes did jack shit! They were in perfect working order. We had to set the e-brake to slow down. ABS is not ideal for wheeling.
 

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If the truck is sliding 7mph down the hill because all the wheels locked up at 4mph, then the ABS had nothing to do with the slide, and it will never engage because it only reads the wheel speed, which is 0mph when they're all locked & sliding. Setting the e-brake will just keep the rears locked & may let the fronts roll so you can steer, but it has nothing to do with the inactive ABS.

So I still don't unnerstan why you think ABS hurts wheeling.
 

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If the truck is sliding 7mph down the hill because all the wheels locked up at 4mph, then the ABS had nothing to do with the slide, and it will never engage because it only reads the wheel speed, which is 0mph when they're all locked & sliding. Setting the e-brake will just keep the rears locked & may let the fronts roll so you can steer, but it has nothing to do with the inactive ABS.

So I still don't unnerstan why you think ABS hurts wheeling.
E-brake went on after ABS was ineffective. The point is the brakes did not lock up they worked like ABS should and pulse braked which caused us to pick up speed every time they let go. I personally will not have ABS on my wheeler.

Steve I am not a retard. I fully understand the workings of ABS and I can tell you that my issues with them were real world experience. Not based on the theory of how they operate.
 

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If you run it off of the toggle switch, do you have to bypass the pump at all or would it just act like it was not there when the switch is armed?
 

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When ABS is disabled for any reason, normal brakes work. The pump is only to move "vented" fluid back to the MC, so if ABS is off, nothing gets vented, and the pump won't run.
 

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ABS Delete Help

Hey guys,

This is my first post on the forum, but I've been reading posts here for a while. Anyway, I've got a 96 5.8 4x4 Bronco with 35s on it. I was having problems with the ABS light being on and the transmisson (E4OD) going into safe mode. I tried replacing the VSS in the differential, but that didn't work and caused the speedometer to jump once it hits 40 (didn't do that before). I figured it was tied to the ABS light issue so I've tried bypassing the wires where the abs connector plugs into the module (I spliced them with butt connectors) and took out fuses #2 and #8 in the Power Box, but I'm still getting the ABS light and the tranny issue. I know the next thing to check is either unplug the RABS or check the spider gears. My question is I can't find the plug for the ABS and if I unplug it will I lose my speedo all together? Plus I really don't have the $$$ to rebuild the rear end just yet. Thanks
 

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Won't work was what I meant. Ok, I have taken it 2 steps further. I reprogrammed the PSOM to the correct tire size (guy a bought it from swore he already did it). I still have the ABS light and it shifts a lot smoother but the trans still went in limp mode while going up hill at about 40. I did notice one other thing. When I bypassed the ABS at the module, I saw that the MC had the old style cruise switch on it. I got the recall notice after I got the truck, but since I never use cruise I just unplugged it. Would that be causing my abs and trans issue? I know it's an easy fix, but I thought it'd be easier to just unplug it and not worry about it.
 

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There is no such thing as "limp mode" or "safe mode" on Fords; particularly in EEC-IV ('84-95) or EEC-V ('96). What exactly did the trans do, or NOT do?

The SCCDS on the MC has nothing to do with ABS; it's strictly for cruise.
 

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yo M,

Check Engine Light (CEL) comes on when the electronic engine control system is not working properly. The check engine warning indicator comes on briefly when the ignition switch lock cylinder is turned to ON, and should turn off when the engine starts. If the check engine warning indicator does not come on when the ignition switch lock cylinder is turned to ON or if it comes on while the vehicle is moving, the system is malfunctioning
If the CEL does not light up at all when starting it; then suspect that bulb is burnt-out or loose, socket was damaged by PO or shop, etc. or someone removed it.
Get your Bronco tested for Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs for fre @ local parts store.


Same for Amber ABS lamp in Instr Panel..
The anti-lock brake electronic control module monitors the electromechanical components of the system. Malfunction of the anti-lock brake system will cause the Anti-lock brake electronic control module to shut off or inhibit the system. However, normal power assisted braking remains. Malfunctions are indicated by the amber ABS warning light inside the vehicle.

The 4-wheel anti-lock brake system is self monitoring. When the key is placed in the RUN position, the anti-lock brake electronic control module will perform a preliminary self check on the anti-lock electrical system indicated by a momentary illumination of the amber ABS warning light in the instrument cluster. During vehicle operation, including normal and anti-lock braking, the anti-lock brake electronic control module monitors all electrical anti-lock functions and some hydraulic operations.

In most malfunctions of the anti-lock brake system, the amber ABS warning light will be illuminated. However, most malfunctions are recorded as a coded number in the anti-lock brake electronic control module memory and assist in pinpointing the component needing service. If system is OK, Code 16 will be present.

4WABS DIY Pin-Point Testing in 93-96 Bronco; This is same as in Ford EVTM/PCED/Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via Chilton & miesk5 at http://fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=192557



I'll begin with describing the commonly used term "limp mode" first, then get to Ford's description.

If all the shifts are hard, PCM is going into limp mode that causes E4OD to shift hard because the pressures are increased.
PCM goes into limp mode when it senses an error in the transmission shifting or electrical system.
The most common cause for this is the Manual Lever Position (MLPS) also called Transmission Range (TR) Sensor. This is the sensor that is bolted to the drivers side of the transmission case with the shift lever arm going through the center of the sensor.
Try disconnecting the battery for 15 minutes with the headlamps on. This should clear the limp mode and return the transmission to normal shift strategy. If it does then the problem is intermittent.
If it still shifts hard then the fault is continuously occurring. It is possible that there is another input/output signal problem, but 99% of the time it is the MLPS/TR sensor especially if it clears limp mode proving the problem is intermittent.

happens when the vehicle computer recognizes a problem in it's logic. When an expected signal value from a sensor is sent to the computer and is not within the computer's programmed specifications, "secondary" programs are activated by the computer to strive to protect the transmission from damage the improper sensor signal might cause to occur.

In other words, the computer is always expecting certain signal values from certain sensors i.e. the temperature sensor, the speed sensor, the throttle position sensor, etc. As long as these signals are what it would normally expect for the conditions and is normal based on all the other signals it is receiving from other sensors, it acts normally and accordingly.

If the computer, all of a sudden, receives some crazy signal from one of the sensors that is out of the normal range expected from this sensor, it will go to "emergency" or "secondary" measures.

These emergency measures vary depending on the severity of the defective signal. All this is preprogrammed into the computer's logic by the manufacturer. The manufacturer has decided that as long as a certain parameter of a particular signal is sent from a sensor to the computer, all is well. The manufacturer decided that if this signal is higher than their highest parameter or lower than their lowest parameter, something is wrong with that sensor and the computer should make someone aware of the situation and take action to try to "save" the vehicle systems or powertrain.

Perhaps the computer will simply cause the "check engine" light to come on. The signal variation wasn't severe or critical to cause any mechanical failures but the vehicle's operator is made aware that he or she should have the vehicle checked out electronically to see if a minor sensor has broken down or is starting to send the odd erratic signal. This type of condition is commonly referred to as a "soft code". Normal functions are not affected but if the repair is not made, performance or fuel efficiencies might suffer. Perhaps the sensor only malfunctioned one time and all other times was fine. This might be an early warning of a sensor that is beginning to fail or has a loose connector or connection.

Other times the signal needed to perform operations normally is so far out of specification that the computer has no choice but to go into survival mode. With transmissions, the computer will cause the internal tranny fluid line pressure to default to high to protect clutches and bands. The transmission also turns off the shift solenoids to cause the unit to default to a single gear, usually second or third. All normal instructions to control line pressure are overridden so a hazardous "slipping condition" cannot occur easily. This theoretically is so that the vehicle's driver can get the damaged vehicle to the next town for repairs. This condition is commonly called "Limp Mode" for this reason. You limp to the next town in second or third gear only, at full line pressure so the tranny guts won't slip on your trip in.

By the way, interestingly and just as a side note, if the cable harness going to your transmission was ever to become detached, severed or damaged, your transmission would also go to "limp mode".
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miesk5 note; check it on passenger side of trans.

E4OD solenoid body connector seating by SeattleFSB
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The vehicle's computer would immediately sense that it has lost contact with the transmission and would set the codes and send "limp mode" signals to the tranny. But because the harness is severed between the computer and the transmission, no computer signals will reach the transmission. These sent signals, however, would have had the identical affect on the transmission as what taking away supplied power to the shift and line pressure solenoids has as in the case of a transmission harness being detached or cut. Due to the engineered voltage strategies of the solenoids, the transmission simply defaults to a single gear and line pressure defaults to high, all in order to "limp" you home.

A Throttle Position Sensor that improperly sends a reading that it is wide open when in fact it is physically closed would be detected by the computer when it compared this reading with the vehicle speed sensor that perhaps is showing very slow vehicle speed. The signal, by itself can't be considered wrong but when put against all the other sensor signals of the system might cause a computer concern. The computer, at this point, unable to "trust" the collection of signals because together they are not making sense in it's logic, will simply go to limp mode in the transmission to protect it and make the operator aware that something is wrong with one of the sensors and a mechanic's attention is needed to correct the situation.

Source: by Greg O at autotransinc.com via webarchive.org

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Failure mode effects management (FMEM) is an alternate system strategy in the powertrain control module (PCM) designed to maintain vehicle operation if one or more sensor inputs fail. When a sensor input is perceived to be out-of-limits by the PCM, an alternative strategy is initiated. The PCM substitutes a fixed value and continues to monitor the incorrect sensor input.
In this mode, engine power and vehicle speed are reduced, while full function of the power steering, power braking, lighting, and climate control systems are maintained.
If the suspect sensor operates within limits, the PCM returns to the normal engine running strategy.
 

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Thanks miesk5. I haven't checked the MLPS or solenoid body connection. That's where I'll go next. Basically what it's doing is when I hit 55-60 on the highway or about 40-45 going up hill it will sometimes sound like I'm going over railroad tracks or a really rough road and then cause the OD light to flash on and off. From there, once I come to a stop, it's a hard shift from 1st and 2nd and 2nd and 3rd (this one is not as harsh). Once I shut the truck off and start it back up, it goes away until I do one of the above things. It's been like that since about 3 months after I got the truck. I changed the transmission fluid and filter and it went away for almost 2 months, but then started right back. Steve83, I don't mean to be a pain I'm just frustrated. Thank you guys
 

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BTW there are NO OBDII codes or KOEO codes. They only ones I've had since I got the truck was an EGR error I fixed by cleaning it and an O2 sensor code that was fixed by drilling into the exhaust line and putting in a bung and a new sensor (previous owner cut out 2nd cat converter). ABS codes I pulled showed an error in all (31,32,33) and code 18 but I already bypassed the ABS (that was a stupid move on my part). After I did the hard bypass (spliced wires) I plugged the ABS connector back into the module. Would that still cause the ABS light. I'm sorry for getting the thread off track. This is the most work I've ever done on a vehicle and I'm all self taught. Again, sorry if I come off like an idiot.
 

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yo,
The ABS Codes will cause the ABS light to illuminate while driving.
No worries about not knowing all this stuff; local mom & pop garages don't have the correct Ford manuals or access to ALL Data, etc. in order to troubleshoot ABS; they just remove and replace, starting with VSS Sensor on rear diff. and then refer customers to local Ford dealer.


The flashing OD LED (aka Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL) & Transmission Control Switch (TCS) on shift stalk should set a Code.
The transmission control switch is a momentary contact switch. When the switch is pressed, a signal is sent to the powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650). The powertrain control module then energizes the transmission control indicator lamp and the coast clutch solenoid, applying the coast clutch to provide engine braking and cancels fourth gear operation. The TCIL indicates overdrive cancel mode activated (lamp on), electronic pressure control circuit shorted or monitored sensor failure (lamp flashing).
A transmission control switch and an indicator labeled OVERDRIVE is located on the end of the gearshaft lever. Press this switch and the word OFF will illuminate on the shift lever knob. With the word OFF illuminated, the transmission will operate in gears one through three. Operating in overdrive OFF gives more engine braking than overdrive and is useful for descending hills.

To return the transmission to the normal overdrive operation, press the transmission control switch again. The switch may be used to select overdrive or overdrive OFF at any time the vehicle is being driven.

If the transmission control indicator light is flashing on and off repeatedly, the transmission system is malfunctioning. The transmission will operate in a failure management mode with harsh engagements, firm shift feel, and abnormal shift schedule.


Do you have the OBD II Scan Tool or did a shop or store check for the DTCs? (OBD II DTCs, not the ABS Codes)?

96 Bronco-F-Series Workshop Manual (PARTIAL)

E4OD Automatic Transmission Electronic Control System
Section 07-01A: Transmission, Automatic, E4OD


.. Read other sections such as;
Preliminary Inspection
Transmission Drive Cycle Test
Diagnosis by Symptom
Pick one to read more, such as;
Engagement Concerns
•No Forward Only

•No Reverse Only

•Harsh Reverse Only

•Harsh Forward Only

•Delayed/Soft Reverse Only

•Delayed/Soft Forward Only

•No Forward and No Reverse Only

•Harsh Forward and Reverse

•Delayed/Soft Forward and Reverse

btw, •Run On-Board Diagnostics. is the code Scanner test
or;
Shift Concerns
•Some or All Shifts Missing

•Timing Concerns

◾Early/Late (Some/All)

◾Erratic/Hunting (Some/All)

•Feel Concerns

◾Soft/Slipping (Some/All)

◾Harsh (Some/All)


etc.


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Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL) Troubleshooting in 92-96; "... fuse blew. it was Fuse 17 due to a harness short under steering column that affected the OD Cancel Light (it blinked randomly, no Trouble Codes or tranny malfunctions though)..."
Source: by miesk5 at http://www.fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=109478&highlight=Transmission+Control+Indicator+Lamp
WIRING DIAGRAM IN A 96

Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL) Troubleshooting in 92-96; "... Several different complaints concerning the overdrive cancel indicator may occur due to a faulty O/D cancel LED. At times the light may simply fail to light, flicker erratically, or glow very dim. Tapping the shift knob lightly may affect the operation of the LED, causing it to work temporarily. These complaints are usually due to a faulty O/D indicator LED. To replace the LED carefully pry the cap off the end of the shifter and pull the LED/switch out. Slide the new switch into position and snap the cap back on. Note: Don’t confuse the above conditions with a steady flashing pattern of the O/D cancel light. A steady rhythmic flashing pattern indicates a malfunction has been detected by the computer.; Part #F58Z-7G550-A..."
Source: by ATC-Distribution Group Inc. atcdg.com via web.archive.org

Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL) Troubleshooting in 92-96; "... fuse blew. it was 17 due to a harness short under steering column that affected the OD Cancel Light (it blinked randomly, no Trouble Codes or tranny malfunctions though)..."
Source: by miesk5 at http://www.fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=109478&highlight=Transmission+Control+Indicator+Lamp


Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL) Troubleshooting in 92-96; "... Several different complaints concerning the overdrive cancel indicator may occur due to a faulty O/D cancel LED. At times the light may simply fail to light, flicker erratically, or glow very dim. Tapping the shift knob lightly may affect the operation of the LED, causing it to work temporarily. These complaints are usually due to a faulty O/D indicator LED. To replace the LED carefully pry the cap off the end of the shifter and pull the LED/switch out. Slide the new switch into position and snap the cap back on. Note: Don’t confuse the above conditions with a steady flashing pattern of the O/D cancel light. A steady rhythmic flashing pattern indicates a malfunction has been detected by the computer.; Part #F58Z-7G550-A..."
Source: by ATC-Distribution Group Inc. atcdg.com via web.archive.org


This is by Ford;
96 Bronco-F-Series Workshop Manual (PARTIAL)
E4OD Automatic Transmission Electronic Control System
 

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