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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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Discussion Starter #1
So rather than muddle up the random pic thread with my projects and explanations, I figured I'd start a thread.

So I've been building this pcv system oil catch can. It's been quite the R&D process.



Last night I went to drill and tap for the outlet. I was nervous using the 3/8 npt sized fittings, and that they wouldn't fit. Well sure enough, I can't get the tap deep enough, without breaking through the center threaded bore. The fitting won't even start threading in. So cap #3 is also going to the scrap bin. Here's a pic.



I also realized that Im going to have to reposition this hole or the o-ring because it may not seal with this design. Oh well, every mistake made is a lesson learned.

I bought both an 1/8" and a 1/4" pipe tap today, and got a carbide insert boring bar in the mail today. Lol thats 85 bucks for 3 taps lol. I bought 100+ at an estate sale a while back for like 10 bucks. But no NPT taps. You might say I have a tool obsession. You can never have too many tools! :rofl:
 

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Here is my little monster, 1922 South Bend 9'' O series.
 

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Premium Member
1988 5.0L E/B AOD, bone stock+ 1993 5.8L E/B, E4OD, 4"lift with 33's
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Blue, I machine one or two of this and that all day long every day. The shop gets 5" X 7" scratch pads from our steel suppliers. I use these pads to draw a blueprint of what I'm going to machine. Hole/bore size, ID/OD threads, grooves and location are all in there before I've even cut a hunk of metal to work with. The problem with your 3/8 tapped hole would have been seen before you made any chips. A hunk of scratch paper goes a long way...;) Best of luck!:thumbup

I see you have a drawing of some sort. Looks like an assembly drawing. I'm talking about a single drawing of the part your going to machine...
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
Joined
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Here is my little monster, 1922 South Bend 9'' O series.
I learned on a 50s SB 9 inch lathe very similar to that. Followed by a 15" Clausing gear head. I loved that machine.

My personal machine is a grizzly 12x36 gearhead lathe with a 3/4 horse gearhead mill. It's a pretty nice machine so far, but it's no SB.
@bmad01
Yeah, im still getting back into the swing of things. That was my first drawing, and it helped tremendously. I lost all my original papers, notes, and such for machining in that damn fire so it's a bit of a learning curve again.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
Joined
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Some of you have seen this, but I'll post it again. This was my final project at the tech school I attended. It's a Stirling engine powered fan. If I remember correctly, we clocked it at about 650 rpm. I used steel, aluminum, stainless, and brass in this build. Some done on a manual machine, some done on a Haas cnc mill, even using my own g-code programs.







And here's one of my old file handles that went through the fire, after I re-machined it. It's sitting next to the other burnt file handle.

 

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I started out machining antique car parts in my dad's basement before I was old enough to go to school. He would do the setup and get the part started. He would setup spring calipers and show me how to check the part to make sure it would fit. Dad would show me on the dials how much cut to make each time to reach the size needed. I learned old school machining from an old school machinist. We had an Atlas 42 inch lathe with a quick change gear box. There is one for sale on Facebook and I am tempted to buy it, just to restore it. Shipping would cost more than the lathe.

Those great moments learning led me to a career as a CNC Tech making OEM Automotive parts. Twenty plus years of working on just about anything CNC from turning, milling, and grinding. Some of the biggest I have worked on was a 15 station machining centers. Each station capable of 3 or 4 axis.

I am going to spill the beans now. I became disabled due to nerve damage in my neck from being rear ended in a car accident. Spent 10 years sulking, grumbling, and generally upset around the house at what life handed me. One day while parking my ass on the couch I found out that a company close by was making alcohol and nitro fuel pumps and fuel systems for Top Fuel and Funny Car, basically anything with mechanical fuel injection with a Roots or Screw supercharger. No way not in this quiet little county tucked way back in the woods. Impossible I thought. A gearheads dream!! One day while riding to town with my wife, I told her I wanted to find the place to see if it actually existed. We found it and I asked her to stop, I wanted to go in to check it out. A looky loo gearhead trick. It is a small mom and pop company. Met the owner, and something told me to ask him if he needed a janitor with some machinist ability. Don't know why but I asked. We talked about what I had been doing and what type of machines. The conversation really didn't peak till we discussed my education. I told him I started by learning to operate an old Atlas lathe in my dad's basement, sitting on a bar stool because I wasn't tall enough to see the part. He lit up like he had heard he won the lottery. I got a shop tour and it was mostly older CNC milling and turning machines, we are talking about 1980s 1990s vintage. Old school tech, simplistic with low count production in mind. No high speed high count production runs. No machines designed and setup to run one specific part. I left my info in case he ever decided he needed a janitor that could do some machining.

Two months later I get a call he had added a few more machines and needed some help. It is a great match. He gets the benefit of having someone that can take on the trival machining tasks while he handles the technical side, the hand assembly and testing of each pump. I don't need the high dollar pay that a typical machinist with the years of experience draws and I get my ass off the couch 3 or more days a week. Huge benefit for both of us!!

Oh a bonus on top of that is that we have an engine shop, engine dyno room, and a large 2 bay race shop. We do get occasional visits from customers either with new race cars that need final touches on a new fuel system to give them a starting point for their race program or the customer with a new engine combo for dyno development. Most of the stuff is hemi based but we do get an occasional blown big block.

Sorry for the crappy pics but that is with an old school cell phone and me with the shakes. I give you Rage Fuel Systems home of the fastest and quickest fuel pumps and fuel systems. Each part of these is made by us, hand fitted, assembled, and tested. Aluminum, Tool Steel, 4100 series alloy, Cast Iron

A note on the car pic. That is not Gotham but the actual city outline of Chicago.
Sorry for the long post. For those TL/DR Never give up on your dream. No job is too trivial.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
Joined
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
My teacher was in the industry for 30 years. He retired and became a teacher. He was phenomenal, and was one of those old school type of guys, and a Vietnam era Marine.

We had a couple of those "retrofitted" cnc machines. One was a big 16×60 Eagle from about 1995. That was the only machine I crashed. I forgot to turn the spindle on and plunged an 1/8" drill bit straight into the work. The bit was never found lol.

I had a job at a job shop for a week and couldn't stand it. 8hrs straight in front of a Bridgeport wasn't why I got into machining. I'm more of a project guy, than a repetitive line worker.
 

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Luckily for me I can run two or three machines at a time depending on cycle times. We don't run tool changers, so I am constantly moving checking parts, changing tools, or replacing parts on fixtures.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Luckily for me I can run two or three machines at a time depending on cycle times. We don't run tool changers, so I am constantly moving checking parts, changing tools, or replacing parts on fixtures.
Yeah, that's the beauty of CNC. My teacher would talk about the NC tapes that they used to fuse together to keep the machine running all night.

The central hub of that fan had about a 30 minute cycle time.

You manually change tools? Just because you don't have a changer or that's just how you do It?

I got to see a 5 axis machining center up in Wamego, next door to the Caterpillar plant, that could mill a full size H2 hummer and have another block of steel ready to go. They said it took 12 semis to bring it all in.
 

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We have tool changers but choose not to use them.

I have worked on old screw machines that would probably first gen NC controls from Siemens. They used metal punch tapes for the 3rd axis.

Our machining centers were round table that had 12-15 stations on the table the tooling was placed surrounding the table. One rotary axis on the table to flip or turn the part and a possibility to machine from the top, front, or bottom of the part all at the same time. Possible to have 30 machining stations all active at the same time.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The exterior is done. Got a tiny bit left to do on the inside

 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
It's finished! Short of finding a different o-ring.

Here's the cap, and diverter. The diverter piece has plenty of clearance around it for air to flow past it.





Shoving in the stainless "steel wool" scrubby pad. I used half of one.

 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Version 2.0

Started with a 5" piece of 2" diameter 1/4" wall 6061 aluminum tube. Costs about 10 bucks a foot. I faced one end, and removed only enough from the O.D. to true it up and remove the mill surface. Then I turned the O.D. down to 1.749 for about 3/4". After doing an undercut that doubles as an o-ring seal, I cut some threads: 1 3/4-20. You can see how much thicker this tube is. You'll see later where that comes in handy.



I flipped it around, and trued up the other end to match. Then I cleaned up the bore so I could press-fit a plug in the end.

 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Pressing the plug into the end. 1.544 into 1.542 hole.



It's in. Now to clean up the O.D.



You can see where the plug will be cut off.



Look at that finish! Done with a custom ground HSS bit at 600 rpm. A little aluminum tap-magic fluid works wonders.

 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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Discussion Starter #18
I don't think I own any wd40. I'm a kroil/pb blaster guy. I have used it for polishing both steel and aluminum though. I used wd and 1200 grit to polish the base of my fan to the mirror finish.
 

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I hate to say it but I do like wd-40 for turning aluminum. It is the best cutting fluid for aluminum and many old timers have told me the same.
 

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Premium 4 Lyfe - Way Back Staff
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" on 33's
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I can't believe I missed this one too. :banghead I've been so focused on my pull and pray engine work, I'm falling way behind on keeping up with FSB. :brownbag

The fabrication looks great man. Clean, efficient, tough ass looking, tight little part. :thumbup Much cooler than that over-sized, bling-zippity crap I was checking out everywhere else online. There's a lot to be said for K.I.S.S. :beer

here's my lathe...and my table saw and my drill press and my... :toothless :goodfinge
 
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