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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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Discussion Starter #61
Logan makes good machines.

All you really need is a machinists level and some shims. Mines level within about .005 per foot. Not perfect, but close enough.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #62
So I haven't fired the lathe up in a while, but needed to make a tool to punch holes in gasket material. They make these for working leather, but I don't have one. This isn't very interesting really, but the main point is being able to make your own tools. It comes in handy way more often than you can imagine.

I chucked up a piece of 4140 in the lathe, and faced the end. Then set about drilling a 1/4" hole in the end.



Compound rest set up for making a 45° bevel on the end to act as the knife edge. The cutting tool follows the path of the compound rest, instead of parralel to the lathe or perpendicular.



Like I said, super simple. I could have knurled it, but it's not necessary.



To use it, place the hole over the exact area you want to put a hole in the gasket. Then whack the end with a hammer like a punch a couple times, and then twist a little. Poof! Perfect hole for a bolt to go through.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #63
Needed to make an A-dapter fitting to mount my temp sender into my thermostat housing. More of a spacer really.

Chucked up some 1" 6061 aluminum and started turning.



Taking shape...



Using the parting tool I forgot I had.



Finished. 3/8 npt female threads. 5/8-18 male threads because I don't have a 3/8 NPT die. They are the same size, but the 5/8 -18 isn't tapered.



Looks like a fitting to me!



And, installed in the thermostat housing.

 

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Premium 4 Lyfe - Way Back Staff
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" on 33's
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That must just be a kick in the ass to be needing a part and just wonder over and whip it out, rather than go search, find, buy and hope it's worth 1/2 what you paid when it finally shows up. Very cool man. :thumbup
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #65
Yeah, it's very handy to have this ability. Hard telling how many store bought fittings I would have had to buy and try. Let alone going to town and however many stores. Fittings ain't cheap either. Heck I had at least double the cost in fittings on that catch can as I did in aluminum.

I think this looks better than some other conglomeration of fittings too.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #66
Had an issue with my stub shaft clearancing the bolt holding my axle beam in. So while waiting for my fuel regulator to come, I tore down the passenger side axle. Got the stub shaft out and marked where the bolt comes close.



As I was pressing the slip shaft end off, the cap of the u-joint broke. I didn't snap a pic, but it was the darnedest thing. The face of the bottom cap busted off. So got to get a new one of those.

Got the stub chucked up in the lathe.



Not sure how much I took off, as it wasn't critical. I kept the original angle on the yoke portion. Its close to 45°.







At the end, I chamfered the left end of my machined surface and where the angle is, I took a round file to negate any chance of a stress crack.

Gained a good deal of clearance on that bolt.

 

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It all looks great Blue!

My machine is a little small for some of that, especially the stub shaft but your right, it's ridiculous how handy a lathe is.
 
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I needed a dial clamp early on when I first got my lathe so I turned and milled one on my lathe.



That black piece started out as 1.25 or 1.5 round stock and was machined 100% on my old South Bend.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #69
Yeah, mines a gearhead, and a bit bigger than the ole SB. It's a gunsmithing lathe so it's got a pretty good sized spindle bore.

Not sure what kind of fordium metal this stub was made of. But it was hard all the way through, yet machined quite nicely. It did bust the tip off my HSS cutting tool twice, but I was taking deeper cuts than I probably should've been. I should have gotten pics of the blue chip balls it threw off when the tip broke. It honestly cut kind of like cast iron, but was more steely than iron.
 

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They are cast steel, turning cast iron is MESSY!
 

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Speaking of cast iron, I hated the tiny flexy cross slide my 1922 SB has so I bought a casting and made one with T slots.


This also let me use a more modern compound. The old 1922 compound didn't even have a dial on it, what a PITA to use.


All done.


 
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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #72
They are cast steel, turning cast iron is MESSY!
Yeah, it just powders up! At least its self-lubricating! I really like working with brass. I hate 1018, just for the poor surface finish. 12L14 is my favorite steel to machine. It cuts like butter

Nice work on the compound slide. That will make milling easier for ya
 

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Thanks,

I whipped up this thread dial once I found a complete set of change gears for the lathe. I can now thread anything from 4tpi to 80tpi and even metric.




I did not make the actual dial or bronze acme gear, it was a kit with a blue print although the print did me little to no good since it was for a much newer lathe. I did make the brass oiler with a pen spring and a ball bearing.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #74
Been a long while. We moved, and I now have a dedicated room in the new shop for my lathe. Heated and air conditioned even! Finally got the lathe leveled out.

Today's project is a heat sink for my onboard air system. I started with a 6" long piece of 2" diameter 6061 aluminum. Chucked it up and faced both ends.

20200531_121516.jpg


Then out came the center drill, to start the bore through it.

20200531_121653.jpg


Followed by a pilot drill, and a 9/16 drill. Had to flip it around to get all the way through.

20200531_122124.jpg


Then a 3/8NPT tap. The entire bore is 9/16, and both ends tapped.

20200531_123220.jpg


Then the time consuming part. Using an 1/8" parting tool to cut the fins. Gaps and fins are 1/8".

20200531_130400.jpg


20200531_142000.jpg


20200531_144523.jpg


Just gotta deburr it, and make it look a bit better. Just gonna use scotchbrite on it.
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #76
Thanks! The preferred method is doing the fins on a mill, using a slitting saw and rotary table. I could have done twice as many fins, in about the same time. But alas, I still havent torn into the mill head to figure out what's wrong. Most likely a sheared pin on the drive gears.

I have a new appreciation for the guys machining the original Tommy gun barrels, with all those fins! At least they weren't as deep as mine here.
 
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If it is not a Bronco, it's just not worth driving.....
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Hey there @BigBlue 94 , I just got myself a 9x19 lathe myself. Thought I would dabble in the arts of machining as well.

Expect some questions to help me flatten my learning curve !! ;)
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,318 Posts
Discussion Starter #79
Hey there @BigBlue 94 , I just got myself a 9x19 lathe myself. Thought I would dabble in the arts of machining as well.

Expect some questions to help me flatten my learning curve !! ;)
Hey Ken! Congrats on the purchase. The best investment is replaceable carbide insert tooling. At least your main turning tools. The pre ground HSS bits are fine, but if you dont know how to keep them sharp, you'll fight them constantly. Theres also a science to grinding your own bits to shape, which just takes time to master. This also prepares you for sharpening your own drill bits on a bench grinder. For that small of a lathe, you'll want 1/4" or 3/8" cutting tool bits. You'll need LH and RH turning tools (bits), and a grooving/part-off tool. I doubt you'll be single point cutting threads much, but that requires a seperate tool bit too. Next would be a Boring bar. This is like a golf club shape, that will fit in a hole and cut on the inside diameter.

You can easily make things without precise measuring tools, but nothing very precise. The part I just made didnt require any measuring, since the tolerances were very loose. The machine dials did all the measurements I needed. At the very least you need a pair of 6" dial calipers. I prefer quality tools from starret, mitutoyo, etc, but they are way overkill for a hobbyist.

Drill bits need to be properly sharpened. If not, only one edge will cut, and you'll have issues. Note that on a lathe, the drill bit is held rigid, with the work rotating around it. Pilot drills should be the same size as the webbed tip of your next size of drill. And always start with a center drill. Lubricant is necessary, especially for ferrous metals. I like Cool Tool II. But even wd40 works.

Poke around at a website called "the practical machinist". Theres more knowledge there than you can shake a stick at.

And it wouldnt be an intro class without safety!

Never wear loose clothing.
Never wear jewelry.
Tie long hair back.
Tuck your shirt in.
Wear eye protection.
Pay attention at all times when the machine is spinning.

A chuck spinning at any speed can suck an arm or head (long hair) in and do serious damage or kill you. A spinning workpiece can suck a hand in and the cutter wont know the difference.

Have fun! And feel free to ask any questions.

And a fun trivia fact: a lathe is the only machine that can completely make a working "copy" of itself.
 

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I have tremendous appreciation for someone who actually knows what they are doing on a lathe... because I am sure as hell not one of them.

I bought a Siege SC8 several years ago based on an on-line review at mini-lathe.com home page. Didn’t realize at the time the guy only lived about 15 miles away. Frank’s been a great mentor.

He worked out a deal with DRO-Pros to do a DRO review and I wound up getting the read outs at cost. Not only did Frank help set my lathe up, I learned a ton from him during the install.

You may never see my face on this forum, but my hands are famous - que Waylon Jennings and “The Dukes of Hazzard” - here is the DRO going on my lathe where I’m the “hand model”: Project: Installing DROs on DRO-Pros C8 Lathe
 
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