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Eric
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2,552 Posts
Pressure is regulated at 20, while the trigger is live. That's in accordance with the Hobart instructions for setting up the Arg/CO2 mix gas.

Appreciate the input gentleman. Beyond the adjustments I mention before, part of my problem may be that all my experience had been sheet metal, not thick steel so maybe I'm expecting better penetration than I really need? On the flip side of the welds, you can see the discoloration and a little metal flake but that's about it.

When I get to repairing the A-arm, would zapping a line down both sides be better to ensure the weld is bonding the crack completely through or could that weaken the surrounding metal too much? I was planning to weld it, grind it down flat and then zap a cover plate to stiffen it up more. Possibly even add a matching plate to the other side, that appears to be ok, so far.

I don't have a flap wheel yet. Just a very old, large, electric buffer/grinder with a hard, I wanna say... 8" disk. I have an air-disk cutter as well and the only other thing I have in my tools for cutting thick metal is my sawzall. Woefully low on metal working tools.
The welds in your pics don't look terrible, Pepe`. Also, penetration appears to be okay as the edges of the weld bead are "wet in" decently and aren't mounded up and rolled-over/undercut. I'd say those welds would stick metal together and hold. For the A-arm, you can opt to drill a small hole at either end of the crack to head it off and prevent "creeping" and grind into the crack a little with the side of a hard wheel to back-fill with a weld bead. This ensures more complete penetration. Also, try to pull the weld puddle rather than push it. Pulling tends to send the weld deeper, as you're pumping wire into a pre-heated section, and pushing tends to make it flatter with slightly less penetration because you're "biting" into new/cold material with the weld arc. Don't grind down a weld if it's application is structural. The weld material is where much of the strength comes from as the wire used in MIG process is typically ER70S-x. This means the wire maintains a ~70,000 psi yield strength and usually exceeds the strength of whatever base material you're welding on. Fishplating the back of the item, over the crack on the opposite side, with a box-welded piece, is a good idea but might be overkill for just a crack/fracture. That would be along the lines of "reinforcement" rather than "repair." It's just a matter of how much effort you deem appropriate for the application/use/abuse of the subject item.

Just my $0.02.
 

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Premium Member
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" lift on 33's
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35,251 Posts
Discussion Starter #142
Well... SuperMotors appears to be working again, after some hiccups over the last few days. In celebration, I'll finally post up some decent pics of the welding cart and the whole thing put together.
$99 at Harbor Freight:


Assembled, with my additional "hang-off" tool/supply bag:


All setup with the Hobart 210 MVP and the Gas:




2 things I use regularly are:
A die grinder, with variety of attachments(both straight and a 90*)
A metal chop saw
I’d love to have:
Gravity band saw
Press brake
another cutting torch (mine got stolen out of my storage unit years ago)
but most of all
A plasma cutter, I used one of those and holly shit I fell in love.
Kills me that my neighbor is setup with all that and more but because of his issues, he can't use it and I can't bug him to use it myself. I told him... if you hear about anybody else in your circles, having an estate sale or liquidating their shop or anything like that... please let me know. He knows a few similar guys hoarding lots of mini-junkyards, so who knows. Nobody's getting any younger and I'm not above taking advantage of a fresh widow... within reason, of course. ;)
I was thinking a cheap-ass plasma cutter might be something to aim for in the future but limited incomes with life's ups and downs usually gets in the way. But... I managed to get my hands on this stuff, so anything is possible when the wind blows in the right direction.

The welds in your pics don't look terrible, Pepe`. Also, penetration appears to be okay as the edges of the weld bead are "wet in" decently and aren't mounded up and rolled-over/undercut. I'd say those welds would stick metal together and hold. For the A-arm, you can opt to drill a small hole at either end of the crack to head it off and prevent "creeping" and grind into the crack a little with the side of a hard wheel to back-fill with a weld bead. This ensures more complete penetration. Also, try to pull the weld puddle rather than push it. Pulling tends to send the weld deeper, as you're pumping wire into a pre-heated section, and pushing tends to make it flatter with slightly less penetration because you're "biting" into new/cold material with the weld arc. Don't grind down a weld if it's application is structural. The weld material is where much of the strength comes from as the wire used in MIG process is typically ER70S-x. This means the wire maintains a ~70,000 psi yield strength and usually exceeds the strength of whatever base material you're welding on. Fishplating the back of the item, over the crack on the opposite side, with a box-welded piece, is a good idea but might be overkill for just a crack/fracture. That would be along the lines of "reinforcement" rather than "repair." It's just a matter of how much effort you deem appropriate for the application/use/abuse of the subject item.

Just my $0.02.
They don't look terrible huh? Well... that's something at least. HAHA.
That's some excellent and perfectly detailed advice for me bud. Again, much appreciated. I've been doing a little homework on the side, so I'm getting the gist. I was actually pulling with those welds, no pushing fwiw but again, I hope to do much better when I can see and stand and use my arms properly.

The crack on the A-frame turns out to be a weld crack where the cross piece was factory welded to the outside arm. The crack worked from the bottom up, which is a little surprising, considering the leverage stress should be working in the opposite direction in that area. That's why the plating over the outside of the arm is a thought. I had a long time pipe-welder buddy take a look at it the other day when he came up to visit and he suggested it as well. I'm considering adding another re-enforcement plate to the opposite side as well... just because it seems to be so odd.
Inside shot:


Inside Close-up:


Outside shot:


Outside close-ups:



The only impact that should have effected it that way would have been from dropping the blade and I'm working out here in the gravel and dirt, not pounding against a paved road or parking lot. Considering that... it could have been prior years of stress done before I bought it from the kid who abused the hell out of it but started a successful business on it's back, plowing out college and small business lots in the city.

Sorry... rambling. I picked up the spare scrap piece my neighbor gave me this afternoon with the hoist on the flatbed. Got it cleaned up and setup to dry off. Didn't feel up to it but we've got some weather coming through, so I wanted to get it inside where I can play with it at my leisure. On further review, I'll probably use it as my "stand". It's a far cry from any kind of bench or stand but if I can securely prop up the a-frame on it, I'll feel a lot better about working on that piece.



As a passing note tonight... in all the reading, viewing, re-viewing I've gone through recently, I just read one of the best comments on a talented welder I've ever come across. You guys in the practice might get a kick out of it too:
"That guy is so good, he could weld a fart to a rainbow!"
 

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Ford Hoarder
78 & 92
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6,508 Posts
Agree on the fishplate, I also use the pull method sometimes. The other good thing about this is that is gives you great veiw of the puddle. Also agree on drilling hole to stop crack, or at the least make very sure you have welded all the crack. Sometimes as your going along the heat of welding tends to open up the crack more and you end up with longer one then you anticipated.

After seeing the issue I believe I would add a corner gusset between the square plate and the a-frame, parrellel with ground. I would also consider getting some angle iron and welding it ontop of that existing a-frame. This should help with it bending right there. This is in additon to the extra fish plates already mentioned.
Or maybe I would consider adding some tubing (round) to the bottom of the angle a-frame which would go from as close to the pivot brave as possible back to the truck frame side pivot angle piece.. Hopefully tucking up in the angle iron nicely as to not mess up ground clearance.
EDIT looked again you maybe able to do the same as I mention above with just some plate steel, making what would look like a triangle on the bottom. Maybe 2" wide pieces.
 

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Super Moderator
Joined
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14,531 Posts
2 things I use regularly are:
A die grinder, with variety of attachments(both straight and a 90*)

A metal chop saw

I’d love to have:
Gravity band saw

Press brake

another cutting torch (mine got stolen out of my storage unit years ago)

but most of all

A plasma cutter, I used one of those and holly shit I fell in love.
These are the two things I wish I had but do not..huge time savers and make things a lot easier..

@BikerPepe` , on that pressure setting, 20 is recommended, but I'd say you can dial it back a bit if you're working in doors. No need to waste gas..
 

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Registered
1984, 300 L6, smogless, manual 3speed with overdrive.
Joined
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754 Posts
These are the two things I wish I had but do not..huge time savers and make things a lot easier..

@BikerPepe` , on that pressure setting, 20 is recommended, but I'd say you can dial it back a bit if you're working in doors. No need to waste gas..
MILWAUKEE ELEC TOOL 6177-20 14" Cut Off Machine, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0058KIGQM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_zLL-Db1H68CF1
Here’s the chop saw I have.

this is the bandsaw style I want
SHOP FOX W1715 3/4 HP Metal Cutting Bandsaw https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001R23T1C/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_BOL-DbS89MDB0
 

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Registered
'92 Custom w/ '95 MAF 5.0, 33's, 4.10 LSD
Joined
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2,008 Posts
My welding cart is also from Harbor Freight, but it's the $8 (after coupon) small furniture dolly, which is the perfect size for your typical portable welder:


That's sufficient for rolling it out of the garage, and small enough to tuck into the corner and out of the way, since I have precious little storage space.

As far as cutting tools, I just got one of these two days ago but haven't tried it out yet:


I'd been watching the various specials for a while and finally caught a discount ($71) and free shipping (on $100+) promo in conjunction.
 

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Eric
Joined
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2,552 Posts
Well... SuperMotors appears to be working again, after some hiccups over the last few days. In celebration, I'll finally post up some decent pics of the welding cart and the whole thing put together.
$99 at Harbor Freight:


Assembled, with my additional "hang-off" tool/supply bag:


All setup with the Hobart 210 MVP and the Gas:





Kills me that my neighbor is setup with all that and more but because of his issues, he can't use it and I can't bug him to use it myself. I told him... if you hear about anybody else in your circles, having an estate sale or liquidating their shop or anything like that... please let me know. He knows a few similar guys hoarding lots of mini-junkyards, so who knows. Nobody's getting any younger and I'm not above taking advantage of a fresh widow... within reason, of course. ;)
I was thinking a cheap-ass plasma cutter might be something to aim for in the future but limited incomes with life's ups and downs usually gets in the way. But... I managed to get my hands on this stuff, so anything is possible when the wind blows in the right direction.


They don't look terrible huh? Well... that's something at least. HAHA.
That's some excellent and perfectly detailed advice for me bud. Again, much appreciated. I've been doing a little homework on the side, so I'm getting the gist. I was actually pulling with those welds, no pushing fwiw but again, I hope to do much better when I can see and stand and use my arms properly.

The crack on the A-frame turns out to be a weld crack where the cross piece was factory welded to the outside arm. The crack worked from the bottom up, which is a little surprising, considering the leverage stress should be working in the opposite direction in that area. That's why the plating over the outside of the arm is a thought. I had a long time pipe-welder buddy take a look at it the other day when he came up to visit and he suggested it as well. I'm considering adding another re-enforcement plate to the opposite side as well... just because it seems to be so odd.
Inside shot:


Inside Close-up:


Outside shot:


Outside close-ups:



The only impact that should have effected it that way would have been from dropping the blade and I'm working out here in the gravel and dirt, not pounding against a paved road or parking lot. Considering that... it could have been prior years of stress done before I bought it from the kid who abused the hell out of it but started a successful business on it's back, plowing out college and small business lots in the city.

Sorry... rambling. I picked up the spare scrap piece my neighbor gave me this afternoon with the hoist on the flatbed. Got it cleaned up and setup to dry off. Didn't feel up to it but we've got some weather coming through, so I wanted to get it inside where I can play with it at my leisure. On further review, I'll probably use it as my "stand". It's a far cry from any kind of bench or stand but if I can securely prop up the a-frame on it, I'll feel a lot better about working on that piece.



As a passing note tonight... in all the reading, viewing, re-viewing I've gone through recently, I just read one of the best comments on a talented welder I've ever come across. You guys in the practice might get a kick out of it too:
"That guy is so good, he could weld a fart to a rainbow!"
Now that I see the crack, yes, fishplate that thing. If a split compromises the perimeter edge of the material, then it's a VERY good idea (professionally mandatory) to add reinforcement. I thought it was a hairline crack centrally located on the material. Didn't know the material was split clean through on the edge. I would grind down that outside corner edge of the subject angle to create a chamfer and fully box-weld another section of angle right over it. You need to chamfer the sharp corner of the subject material in order to "clearance" it for the inside radius of the fishplate angle and allow it to sit flat. Once that's done, grind out the inside of the subject angle, as best you can, right along the crack to create a relief channel for a weld and weld that. Access will be difficult, because it's on the inside, but do as best as you can. It's not hyper-critical, though, as the fishplate angle on the outside will bear 99.673% of the load. 😁 I'm suggesting putting the fishplate angle on the outside of the subject piece because it would be more difficult to get comfortable to lay the welds if it were on the inside and clearance appears to be an issue with that x-member. Also, because of the forces involved with how the arm is mounted/used, it will put the fishplate welds under compression, mounted on the outside, as opposed to tension. There is less chance of the weld failing that way.

Again, just my $0.02 and completely subject to discretion.
 

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Premium Member
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" lift on 33's
Joined
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35,251 Posts
Discussion Starter #148
Well... I gotta be honest @silver70 and say that most of that went right over my head. Since the crack follows the inside weld, I think plating the outside is really my only choice to get any solid strength out of any re-enforcement I try. I didn't grab any pics because... well, again being honest, I'm still so pissed off with the usability of our site and the abandonment by our benefactors. Obviously, it's nothing against our crew, just the damn site itself.

I finally got out there today and ran a few test beads on some scrap I've gathered up to get comfortable with the new welder. I did a few butt-welds and even a joined a piece of L channel to a flat piece of different thickness. Beat the hell out of it afterwords with a small sledge hammer and nothing would budge. Once I felt ok I spent the rest of the afternoon fighting with the big piece on the make-shift stand but I ground the plows A-arm clean over the crack, drilled holes to stop the cracks from continuing past my welds. I ground a slight channel along the crack on the outside, because I knew I'd be grinding it all flat again to seat the re-enforcement plate flat against the outside. Welded the crack/stop holes and then started welding up the huge crack. First, I tacked the bottom edge of the crack, so it couldn't warp or spread on me as I went along, then welded the top, then the outside, then came back and hit the inside for good measure. Ground the welds flat and everything looked good and solid. I put a 8" long, 2.5" wide (matching the A-arm) 1/4" thick plate, centered over the weld on the outside and tacked it down on all 4 corners. I welded along the entire edge of the plate and the plate matched the A-arm perfectly. All in all... I was pretty happy with it. My welds weren't the prettiest but I've seen worse showed off around here, so I felt ok about it. I added another matching plate to the opposite side, figuring that if it cracked in that weld spot on the one side, it wouldn't be long before it did it on the other.
After both sides were welded up with a solid plate re-enforcing my work and the other potentially "weak" area, I ground my welds smooth. After that, I pulled out my old DA sander, cleaned up the ragged paint edges and sprayed self-etching primer over all my work. The primer is crap from sitting in my shop, freezing and un-freezing but it was just something to keep all the bare metal from rusting out. I plan to pull it all apart again this summer and clean it up.

I've got a few more pieces to check and weld as I get closer to re-assembling and remounting but my body was done, so I wrapped it all up and called it a day. I'll grab a few pics next time I get out there to finish the job up but all in all... the HOBART 210 MVP was a solid purchase and I was very happy with it. Thanks again guys.
 

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1984, 300 L6, smogless, manual 3speed with overdrive.
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754 Posts
Glad you got-R-did! Don’t worry about the welds..... the penetration is more important then the looks!
 

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Ditto.

Burn on your test parts again and cross cut it to see what you’ve done for penetration.

And you really want to practice on a butt joint or a 90 deg joint.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Millermatic 35s, millermatic 200, ESAB/L-tec Migmaster 250, are all great old school Transfirmer based mig machines if you can find them in your price range. They are serviceable and parts wont break the bank. You can also run larger spools of wire in these machines as well so you have more options when buying your wire.

For stick welding I like the old school Lincoln Idealarc 250 ac/dc Tombstone with infinite adjustability. It's a big machine coming in at about 650+ lbs and is bullet proof with a super smooth crisp arc.

Miller has the Dialarc 250 ac/dc that is just about as good imo.

These machines come up for sale from time to time and prices are all over the place depending on lipstick condition, location and how motivated the person is in getting the item sold.
 

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Premium Member
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" lift on 33's
Joined
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35,251 Posts
Discussion Starter #154
I finally got out there today and ran a few test beads on some scrap I've gathered up to get comfortable with the new welder. I did a few butt-welds and even a joined a piece of L channel to a flat piece of different thickness. Beat the hell out of it afterwords with a small sledge hammer and nothing would budge.
And you really want to practice on a butt joint or a 90 deg joint.
That L channel was sitting 90 degrees on the same piece I just butt welded, so... I was right on track bud.

@N2 Bronco's - You're a little late to the party bud. Gotta read the last few pages at least. Settled on the HOBART 210 MVP.
 

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Ford Hoarder
78 & 92
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6,508 Posts
Also agree looks good, should last awhile for sure, I mean that as in years. Also I doubt it fails there agian.
Welds look good to me also, especially for someone who isnt sure of themselves as a welder... I have seen worse (and paid for, long story) "pro" jobs.
 

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The Handler 210mvp is definitely a good machine. I’m sure you’ll get plenty of good hood time With that machine.

My main welder is a Rebel EMP 215ic and I actually have all the other machines I mentioned less the Miller Dialarc.
 

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Eric
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2,552 Posts
Dude... not bad Pepe`! Seriously. For a guy who says he "doesn't weld" those beads look decent. I've seen guys, fresh out of welding school, do worse and get hired. Be neat to see what you're throwin' down in a year. A body/paint guy acquiring welding/fabrication skills? You're gonna be a dangerous man, sir. I bet you come up with some sick stuff in the future. 👍
 

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Premium Member
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" lift on 33's
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35,251 Posts
Discussion Starter #159
Well thank you all for the kind words and good vibes. As I've said in the past... I'm not a total stranger to welding, it's just been a long, long time. When I learned in my community college AutoBody course, back in '88-'89 we started off with Oxy/Acetalyn to get the real "feel" for melting metal before we went on to much easier mig welding and I had a little stick "buzz-box" at home, I played with for a few months too. As I've said... the biggest difference was thin gauge over the thicker gauge stuff I'm working with now. At the time, I didn't keep the buzz-box for long because I wasn't working with very thick metals at the time. Damn shame, looking back but I got more out of it then I had in when I traded it to my "uncle". Regadless... it was a looong time ago and I have smoked a lot of weed between then and now. ;-)

Also agree looks good, should last awhile for sure, I mean that as in years. Also I doubt it fails there agian.
Welds look good to me also, especially for someone who isnt sure of themselves as a welder... I have seen worse (and paid for, long story) "pro" jobs.
Well... my lil' lady's been calling me OKP for years now, for "Overkill Pepe`". I'm an over-thinker (as if you guys don't already know that) but when I finally get around to something, I try my damnedest to make sure I won't have to deal with it again... for a few years, if ever.

The Handler 210mvp is definitely a good machine. I’m sure you’ll get plenty of good hood time With that machine.
My main welder is a Rebel EMP 215ic and I actually have all the other machines I mentioned less the Miller Dialarc.
Sounds like a metal shop, wet dream dude. I hope you're right. That's why I chose to go with that unit.

Ahhh, I only saw the flat bar beads you were working on.
Yea... sorry 'bout that. I almost included a pic of my practice piece(s) but I figured nobody would be that interested and I was having issues with the forum and those got deleted out of my frustration and their lack of priority. When my body starts giving my fits like it has the last few weeks, my patience level drops through the floor.

Dude... not bad Pepe`! Seriously. For a guy who says he "doesn't weld" those beads look decent. I've seen guys, fresh out of welding school, do worse and get hired. Be neat to see what you're throwin' down in a year. A body/paint guy acquiring welding/fabrication skills? You're gonna be a dangerous man, sir. I bet you come up with some sick stuff in the future. 👍
I think I'm "looping" a little too fast as I'm laying down the bead and I still need to see if I can get my helmet settings a little better so I can see where I'm going and keep a straighter line. Practice practice, basically. I'm thinking bout picking up an Rx hood lense too. Using my reading glasses under the hood is a pain in the ass. No danger man here though. I'm way too lazy for that. haha. I do have some high hopes though, after I get a little 4' x 2.5-3' table setup ($$$), a smaller grinder, some decent clamps and then, hopefully I can afford some metal and tools to cut it with.
I'd seriously consider setting up a small business making sliders for our rigs but i've seen a lot of attempts fail over the years around here, as this is a pretty small pool to fish in and rely on, as I'm sure you found. Who knows what the future holds though. I'm just happy to be able to fix my own stuff for now.

Thanks again guys. As usual... having the support of this fine crew makes all the difference.
 

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Yeah it can be nice. Takes up a lot of garage space though.
 
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