Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I have been thinking of installing a C clip eliminator on my 8.8 rear ((96 Bronco) to prevent the axle from walking out of the tubes in the event I break an axle. I could either do that or install a disc brake conversion.

BUT ...

It's my understanding that C clip eliminator's are not very useful at preventing a broken axle slipping outwards under side load (they are more for drag racing in a straight line) and I am not a hard core wheeler, more of an overlander, so before I do anything I thought I would ask y'all what are the odds of actually needing a C clip eliminator at all? I mean, how often does anyone actually break an axle unless you are doing hard core rock wheeling?

I have a feeling I am worried about a problem that very rarely would be an issue. Anyone ever actually lose an axle?
 

·
Registered
95 Bronco, 351W, E4OD, 4.56 gears, 35x12.50x15 Patagonia MTs.
Joined
·
68 Posts
I've had 2 F150s and 2 Broncos with the 8.8" I even did a "fozzy locker" in one of them, then sidestepped the clutch with 1 tire on pavement and 1 on dirt to try to break it, repeatedly. Never broke or damaged an 8.8." Granted my worst abuse was on 32" tires, I'm currently running 35"s and plan on running some of the high lakes trails in Northern California this summer with zero plans for a c clip eliminator, or even worrying if that was done when my Bronco received the 4.56 gears and truetrac.

If you're on 35"s or less and drive like an adult you'll be fine. If you drive like 12 year old/wannabe monster truck driver, get wontons. The C clip eliminator won't save you if you're already breaking things. These axles aren't full floating, so when/if the splines break off, the axle may wobble in the housing and will come out and damage everything if driven in that state too long.
 

·
Registered
95 Bronco, 351W, E4OD, 4.56 gears, 35x12.50x15 Patagonia MTs.
Joined
·
68 Posts
I'd go with some high end pads and shoes before worrying about a disc brake conversion, my F350 can lock up 33s on the freeway with porterfield pads and shoes. :)
 

·
Registered
1984, 300 L6, smogless, manual 3speed with overdrive.
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
I'd go with some high end pads and shoes before worrying about a disc brake conversion, my F350 can lock up 33s on the freeway with porterfield pads and shoes. :)
Now try that with a 40 ft 5th wheel on the back :ROFLMAO:
I have left tracks on the pavement with my 86 F350 when some azzhat pulled out in front of me while I was doing 50 with our house on the back, almost left tracks in my britches as well. Thank god my trailer brakes are fully functional. The look on his face when I came to a complete stop about 2 ft from his driver door was priceless, I’ll bet his life flashed before his eyes, and I’ll never know why the dumb ass actually stopped instead of stomping on the gas to try and get clear ?!o_O
 

·
Premium Member
84 Bronco, 351w, c6, custom doubler, np208, 5.13’s, TTB44, 9”, locked f/r
Joined
·
731 Posts
I think he was considering disc brakes as a safety measure for axle shaft retention, not necessarily for improved stopping power....

I wouldn’t worry about getting c-clip eliminators, I’ve run lots of 8.8’s and never had an issue with shafts or c-clips. I think you need to be on 37”+ tires or hardcore rock bouncing style abuse before it’s really an issue.

Even with a c-clip eliminatior kit, you still aren’t getting very far with a broken axle shaft since you would lose the stability of the shaft in the carrier. You might be able to limp it back to pavement without the shaft walking out, but you aren’t going down the road
 

·
Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
Joined
·
11,532 Posts
37s, an 8.8, and 3.55 gears will break the spider gears. Of course I was in high school... Took off from a stop sign and they broke. That's when I went to a sterling 10.25 and 4.88s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'd go with some high end pads and shoes before worrying about a disc brake conversion, my F350 can lock up 33s on the freeway with porterfield pads and shoes. :)
I agree with that
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I think he was considering disc brakes as a safety measure for axle shaft retention, not necessarily for improved stopping power....

I wouldn’t worry about getting c-clip eliminators, I’ve run lots of 8.8’s and never had an issue with shafts or c-clips. I think you need to be on 37”+ tires or hardcore rock bouncing style abuse before it’s really an issue.

Even with a c-clip eliminatior kit, you still aren’t getting very far with a broken axle shaft since you would lose the stability of the shaft in the carrier. You might be able to limp it back to pavement without the shaft walking out, but you aren’t going down the road
You are correct sir.

I was thinking of the rear disk conversion for partially the benefit of better braking but also as a safety measure to prevent the axle and tire exiting the axle tube if it was to break in half.

I am not convinced a rear disk conversion will help all that much with braking a Bronco loaded down with overlanding gear and roof rack winch etc etc. The rear brakes don't do all that much of the stopping anyway compared to the front. I do agree that a vented rotor and high end pads like Hawk Performance on the front will probably be better for extra stopping power.

I don't plan on running any tires bigger than 35" and I dont do hard core rock crawling, just what is necessary to go on some cool overlanding trips to the more remote locations.

I think you guys have convinced me that a C clip eliminator is not necessary. I am getting concerned over what is probably a very remote or even non issue. Thanks for saving me a bunch of cash and time fixing a problem that doesn't exist.
 

·
Ford Hoarder
78 & 92
Joined
·
6,571 Posts
Agree with all the post on the c-clip eliminator not being needed. I'd spend the money to do that do have someone handy with a TIG (or old school stick guy) to weld the axle tubes to the center section and get a good cover with bearing support jack screws.
Also on the disc vs drum debate I like disc but I play in the sand and mud and have went threw drums in a weekend due to it getting stuck in the drum. I do agree not much, if any, stopping power added though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Agree with all the post on the c-clip eliminator not being needed. I'd spend the money to do that do have someone handy with a TIG (or old school stick guy) to weld the axle tubes to the center section and get a good cover with bearing support jack screws.
Also on the disc vs drum debate I like disc but I play in the sand and mud and have went threw drums in a weekend due to it getting stuck in the drum. I do agree not much, if any, stopping power added though.
Your recommendation to weld the axle tubes to the diff and add a diff cover with bearing support screws is exactly my next project
 

·
Eric
Joined
·
2,560 Posts
Your recommendation to weld the axle tubes to the diff and add a diff cover with bearing support screws is exactly my next project
First, yes to this ^^^. I did that, but TIG'd the backing plate mounts too, for future possible plans. Also, just went with a "cheap" N.I. cover:

154476
IMG_20180301_140756299.jpg


154481



A good investment, to help prevent breaking axles, is to buy good axles. Research your options, in regards to materials and construction/machining practices, and make the best choice that your budget will allow. A C-clip eliminator doesn't stop the axle from breaking in the first place. Buy good parts, not Band-Aids, for reliability. Torque, shock, and load are what break axle shafts and shear splines. Reinforce what you can to combat TQ, buy quality parts to negate shock effects, and keep your tire size in check to minimize load.

Just my $0.02.
 

·
Man of endless projects
Joined
·
8,952 Posts
i would get chromoly shafts and a good aftermarket carrier. then maybe disc brakes as backup if your wanting to. a full floating 8.8" might also be an option but thats expensive for a kinda weak axle. probably be better to go 8 lug in that case or convert a FF 10.25" to 5 lug

its pretty rare to break a 8.8" shaft unless your doing something really stupid. from my experience the only failures ive seen with a shaft being let loose is from a carrier exploding or a facotry traclok limited slip with a ton of wear and alot sideload. both cases happening to me. my previous 96 had traclock and twice under heavy side load the c-clip popped out. my 88 had an open carrier shatter and release a c-clip. my 90 F250 with semi-floating 10.25" exploded a carrier and lost a c-clip. factory traclok cases are pretty weak and ive seen many shatter and release the c-clip. so a good aftermarket carrier would probably resolve the issues.

i have always wanted to build a full floating 5-lug 10.25". dont think its is too hard to do but kinda costly. they sell spindles that are designed to be machined down to fit inside 1-ton axle tubes. then you use a front wheel hub, custom axleshaft, and either lockout or flange. like i said it gets expensive but would be about the ultimate strength while staying 5x5.5 pattern. Ruffstuff actually sells a kit for D60. ive talked to one company years ago and they said it can pretty much be used for any axle if you got the spindles machined down to fit inside the axle tubes
 

·
Registered
95 Bronco, 351W, E4OD, 4.56 gears, 35x12.50x15 Patagonia MTs.
Joined
·
68 Posts
By the way, vented rotors offer zero performance advantage and hawk pads may as well be basic raybestos semi metallic, if they're even that good. Porterfield pads and normal rotors work great. As an ex mechanic, I can safely state that vented rotors are inferior to stock and more prone to warping. Reason being, the extra surface area makes little difference at speed, but allows them to cool faster when stopped, which is when the majority of warping occurs because part of the rotor stays warm under the caliper/pads.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top