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Discussion Starter #1
Is anyone running this locker: http://aussielocker.com/
If so how do you like it and how has it help up so far?
also I was wondering, do you have to take the carrier out when installing this locker in a solid dana 44?
-Derik
 
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I saw these a while back too,

friggin cheap dude, $199.00 bucks.
 

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I have seen a few of them.
There is a write up on pirates board, and the guy who did the write is very pleased with it.

As far as easy lockers go they have been known to be the best.
 

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Only thing I would have to say about them from my research is that drop in lockers are no where near as strong or reliable as a true locker that replaces the carrier.
Those drop in lockers only replace the spider gears so when the wheel slips the locker engages locking the diff, but unfortunatly the torque and stress is distributed through the pinion yoke, and driveline u-joints. So if you pedal on them to hard you will break more joints, and stuff on a regular basis.

A full locker that replaces the entire carrier will absorb most of the stress and is designed to do so. Putting less stress on the rest of the drivetrain.

That is why ARB's and Detroits are so popular and bulletproof.

IMHO I would not run anything bigger than 35 inch tires with a drop in locker, and make sure you carry spare parts with you on the trail.

Just my 2 cents backed up with a lot of research.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Another question?

I am going to be putting 4.10s and a new carrier in my front axle but it will be a few more weeks until I can get the aussie locker and I have the four wheelin' itch! Should I wait until I get the locker, gears, and carrier and install it all at once? or would it be better to install the locker a few weeks after I have been running 4 wheel drive for a while?
The bottom line is- I want to get on a trail but I don't want to have to uninstall everything that I just installed a few weeks prior.
Thanks for all the info,
Derik
 

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I would set up everything BUT the locker first.

There are special instructions to breaking in gears. I am sure you know about that, but if not go to Randy's web site to get instructions.

Once everything is broke in, then install the aussie.
It would be quite simple.
Take off the diff cover.
EDIT: Dont reuse the diff fluid, since it will be dirty from breaking in the new gears. (My bad)

Then take out the spider gears from the diff, and follow the instructions to put in the aussie.

Put the cover and gasket back on, fill her up with the fluid, and make sure it is topped off really well. I keep putting fluid in over and over again until i know for sure that the diff is full.
Then go try it out.:beer
 

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Held up the 37's, Toy axles w/ Longs, 200:1 gearing and a really heavy foot from what I read. Go to the Toy section on Pirate read DRM's write-up for install and subsequent abuse. Basicly a lock-rite w/ improvements
 

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Beerman said:
Since the fluid is going to be clean and new you may as well resuse it.
No it won't. You just broke in gears with it. It should be getting replaced *regardless* of the locker situation.
 

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I was going to say the same thing as Seboh, In ref to the gear oil. Don't reuse the oil.
 

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:stupid Damn we all thought the same thing, I was scrolling down to reply when I saw the others...good advice from Beerman on the break-in, but use new fluid...your not saving but a few bucks to re-use vs. the hundreds if ya re-use lube with particles in it...:thumbup
 

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Beerman said:
Those drop in lockers only replace the spider gears so when the wheel slips the locker engages locking the diff, but unfortunatly the torque and stress is distributed through the pinion yoke, and driveline u-joints. So if you pedal on them to hard you will break more joints, and stuff on a regular basis.

A full locker that replaces the entire carrier will absorb most of the stress and is designed to do so. Putting less stress on the rest of the drivetrain.

Just my 2 cents backed up with a lot of research.
You know, I'm reading this over and over and it makes no sense to me whatsoever. It doesn't matter what kind of locker is in the diff, the pinion and u-joints will see the same forces. A lunchbox locker and a full carrier replacement locker will not affect the drivetrain stress at all. The only difference is how the force is distributed inside the diff, not outside of it.
 

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That is pretty much a copy and paste from what I have read from Trach-Tech write ups in magazines.

It is the difference between a stock carrier , and a full locker that replaces the carrier.

I am no professional at this but when they made a point of how people always break joints, and pinion crap with a lunch box locker, vs. when they upgraded to a Detroit or something like that.

I just put two and two together.

But Dustball I could be completely wrong, I just felt comfortable posting it because that is what I have read in the past.
I do a shiz load of reading so I cant pin-point right now where i read it, but if I trip across it I will re-read it to make sure i didnt misunderstand it.

OH, and sorry all about saying to re-use the gear oil, I edited my response. I dont know what the hell I was thinking.:twak
 

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I recommend the following procedure for breaking in a new gear set: After driving the first 15 to 20 miles it is best to stop and let the differential cool before proceeding. Keep the vehicle at speeds below 60 mph for the first 100 miles. I also recommend putting at least 500 miles on the new gear set before heavy use or towing. During the first 45 miles of towing it helps to go about 15 miles at a time before stopping to let the differential cool for 15 minutes before continuing. This is necessary because not all of the gear tooth is making contact until it is heavily loaded. When towing, the teeth flex to contact completely, and cause the previously unloaded portion of the teeth to touch and work harden. All of this may seem like paranoia, but it is very easy to damage the ring & pinion by overloading before the teeth are broken in. If you take it easy on a new ring & pinion and keep it full of high quality oil, it should last a lot longer.

With regards to limited slip additives, I have found that using too much additive can lead to premature gear wear. Use just enough to keep the limited slip from chattering but not more than 4 oz for every 2 qts of oil. It is a good idea to change the gear oil after the first 500 miles in order to remove any metal particles or phosphorus coating that has come from the new gear set. This is cheap insurance and a good time to discover any problems before they grow to disastrous proportions

This is from Randy's web site.
 

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This slightly random but do factory gears come pre-broken in? I know there is some basic engine breaking but nothing about breaking in the rear end, especially nothing as details as Beerman's post.

Tim
 

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Again, reffering to Randy's page.
In order to make them run cooler and quieter, new gears are lapped at the factory. However, they are not lapped under the same pressures that driving creates. The loads generated while driving, force any microscopic high spots on the gear teeth back into the surface of the metal. This is called "work hardening". Work hardening is similar to forging in the way that it compresses the metal molecules into a very compact and hard formation. This can only be accomplished if the metal surfaces are lubricated and the gear temperature stays cool enough that the molecular structure does not change. If the temperature of the metal gets hot enough to change the molecular structure, it will soften the surface instead of hardening it. This may seen like a balancing act but it all happens easily & passively as long as the oil keeps the gear cool while it is breaking in. Some of the synthetic oils on the market today can help a gear set live longer. I've had great success with Red Line ®, Torco ®, and Richmond Gear ® synthetic gear oils. These oils will continue to lubricate at temperatures where many crude oils break down.
 

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Dustball said:
You know, I'm reading this over and over and it makes no sense to me whatsoever. It doesn't matter what kind of locker is in the diff, the pinion and u-joints will see the same forces. A lunchbox locker and a full carrier replacement locker will not affect the drivetrain stress at all. The only difference is how the force is distributed inside the diff, not outside of it.
OK< Dustball I just found out where I read what I thought I read.
It was in an article on an issue of Four Wheeler back in 2002 IIRC.
I read wrong.
The stress from *either type* of locker will be harder on the pinion yoke and driveline/joints naturally because of the lock up in the differential.

However the difference is that the lunchbox locker will be harder on the axle shafts and AXLE-ujoints since the lunch box lockers distribute the stress evenly over the axle shaft instead of absorbing the stress in the housing that a full locker would handle.
That is why detroit lockers are rated as high as 70,000 psi to handle the load given by locking huge shafts and big tires.

SO all in all the lunchbox lockers will make you go through axle shafts and AXLE u-joints faster than a fully selectable replacement locker will. (More likely u-joints than axle shafts)

I was thinking driveline u-joints, NOT axle u-joints when I read that. DUH.

I apologize for the incorrect info because of lack of memory.
I appreciate you coming forward with that Dustball.
I hope that clears that up for everyone.
Thanks
:thumbup
 

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That doesn't make any damn sense. You're saying a selectable locker is easier on u-joints than an automatic locker? The reasoning behind it doesn't make any sense either.... 70,000 psi? PSI on what? Lockers are rated to ft-lbs of torque, not psi.

The weak link in a lunchbox locker is the carrier itself. It has nothing to do with any of this axle shaft mumbo. Carriers (8.8s in particular) like to split in half when stuffed with lunchbox lockers.

Oh wait.... you read that in FourWheeler.... why am I not surprised? That's the same rag that said the 10.50 was a junkyard jewel, right?
 
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