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Chillin on the Gulf Coast
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Well Uncle Sam decided that I am needed over in Korea for a year, so I am heading over there beginning of March. The plan is to park the Bronco and my Jeep in RV storage lot on base. I will pick up some car covers for the both of them and also some more jack stands. I will obviously disconnect the batteries and lock the doors. But what else should I do? My plan for the Bronco atleast, is to fill the cylinders with engine oil (the motor is fresh and only has about 45 minutes of run time), lock it up good and cover it, put the front and rear axles on jack stands in case the tires go flat, put cotton balls soaked in peppermint oil in the cab and engine bay, disconnect the battery and drain as much gas as I can. I am swapping the gas tank out for a later model one so I may just pull the replacement tank and leave it inside the truck and swap it out after I get back. Would it be a good idea to let the truck idle out of gas so that there is nothing in the lines to gum up and break down? When I get back in a year I plan to replace the belt and hoses, coolant, oil (its still the break in oil), and then siphon the oil out of the cylinders (as best I can), add fresh gas and run it till it burns off the oil in the cylinders then change oil and spark plugs. Anything else anyone can think of?
 

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Super Moderator
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yo CR,

Figures, huh?

Some info may help in this Vehicle Storage - Maintenance Tips Article No. 88-9-9
PUBLICATION DATE: April 27, 1988
FORD
1987-89 All Car Lines
LINCOLN-MERCURY
1987-89 All Car Lines
MERKUR
1987-89 All Car Lines
LIGHT TRUCK
1987-89 All Light Truck Lines
MEDIUM/HEAVY TRUCK
1987-89 All Medium/Heavy Truck Lines

ISSUE New vehicles that are stored for extended periods and not put into service shortly after they are built require special maintenance to make sure that the vehicle stays in "like new" condition.
ACTION If a vehicle is expected to remain in dealer stock for an extended time period, refer to the following maintenance procedures.

General
Store all vehicles in a dry, ventilated place; protect from sunlight if possible.
If vehicles are stored outside, they require regular maintenance against rust and damage.
Body
Wash vehicle thoroughly to remove dirt, grease, oil, tar, or mud from exterior surfaces, rear wheel housing, and underside of front fenders.
Periodically wash cars and trucks stored in exposed locations.
Touch-up exposed raw or primed metal to prevent rust.
Cover chrome and stainless steel parts with a thick coat of auto wax to prevent discoloration. Re-wax as necessary when the vehicle is washed.
Lubricate all hood, door, and trunk lid hinges and latches with a light grade oil.
CAUTION: KEEP ALL RUBBER PARTS FREE FROM OIL AND SOLVENTS.

Cover interior soft trim to prevent fading.
Engine
Start engine every fifteen (15) days. Run at fast idle until it reaches normal operating temperature.
Shift the transmission into all gears while engine is running.
Fuel System
Regularly move vehicles short distances to mix fuel anti-oxidation agents.
NOTE: DURING EXTENDED PERIODS OF VEHICLE STORAGE (60 DAYS OR MORE), GASOLINE MAY DETERIORATE DUE TO OXIDATION. THIS CAN DAMAGE RUBBER AND OTHER POLYMERS IN THE FUEL SYSTEM SUCH AS CARBURETOR ACCELERATOR PUMP, DIAPHRAGMS, AND CARBURETOR INLET VALVES. IT MAY ALSO CLOG SMALL ORIFICES. DIESEL FUEL DETERIORATION IN THE FORM OF FUEL SEPARATION, SLUDGE FORMATION, AND BACTERIAL GROWTH CAN CAUSE RESTRICTIONS IN FUEL SUPPLY LINES, FILTERS, AND STICKING OF FUEL INJECTION COMPONENTS.

A commercially available gasoline fuel stabilizer ("STA-BIL" or equivalent) should be added to gasoline-powered vehicles or a diesel fuel stabilizer ("Fire Prep 1000" or equivalent) to diesel-powered vehicles whenever actual or expected storage periods exceed 60 days. The manufacturer's instructions packaged with the product should be followed. The vehicle should then be operated at an idle speed to circulate the additive throughout the fuel system.

A volatile, corrosion inhibitor ("NOX Rust VCI 105" or equivalent) added to the fuel will protect the fuel tank inner surface from corrosion. Follow instructions packaged with product.

Cooling System
Protect against freezing temperatures.
Battery
Check and recharge as necessary. Keep connections clean and covered with a light coat of grease.
Brakes
Make sure brakes and parking brake are fully released.
Tires
Maintain recommended air pressure.
Miscellaneous
Make sure all linkages, cables, levers, and clevis pins under vehicle are covered with grease to prevent rust.
Move trucks at least 25 feet every fifteen (15) days to lubricate working parts to prevent corrosion.
==========

Storage Tips, Vehicle
Source: by musclecarclub.com
All kinds of vehicles get stored for the winter, ranging from a convertible that's reserved for sunny days to a car or truck that's left behind when snowbirds head south. "Because cars and trucks were made to be driven regularly, winter storage — or any prolonged period of storage—can really take its toll, unless people take a few precautions to protect their vehicle while it's in hibernation," says Sue Elliott-Sink, director of content for enjoythedrive.com." A little work now can protect a vehicle from rust, animals and other storage-related headaches." To help car and truck owners keep their stored vehicles in good shape, here are a few storage tips.



Get it out of the elements! No amount of precautions will protect a car that is stored outside where the sun, rain, or snow will beat on it day in and day out. Put it under a canopy or keep it in the garage.


Keep the fuel fresh. When gasoline sits, it can break down and form gum and varnish, which will clog a fuel system. What's more, any moisture left in the system can cause rust. The solution: Add a container of fuel stabilizer to the gas tank, then fill the tank to the top right before putting the vehicle into storage. The short drive home from the gas station will circulate the stabilized fuel throughout the system, keeping the gas fresh and the system safe until the vehicle is ready to ride again.


Don't let the cooling system freeze during the winter. Drain the system (including the radiator) and refill it with a rust-inhibiting antifreeze.


Change the oil. It's important to remove any acid, moisture and other contaminants from an engine by changing the oil and filter before putting a vehicle to sleep for the winter. It's okay to use the same-viscosity oil as usual, as long as the oil contains corrosion protection.


Avoid flat-spotting the tires. A vehicle that sits for a long period of time can ruin a set of radial tires. The best way to save those expensive tires is to store the vehicle up on jack stands. Some people also may want to remove the vehicle's wheels and tires—or let some air out of the tires to reduce strain on the shocks and other suspension components.


Keep the battery alive. When a battery loses its charge over time, it can freeze and explode. To avoid a dangerous mess, hook up a battery charger/maintainer, which will keep the battery properly charged, no matter how long the vehicle sits.


Protect the paint. Give the vehicle a good washing before it's put away for the winter to remove any road salt or grunge, and be sure to dry it thoroughly, too. Then apply a protective coat of wax. Finally, slip on a breathable cloth car cover. (Plastic covers will trap condensation and provide a fertile breeding ground for rust.)


Check the insurance. Just because a vehicle is sitting undriven doesn't mean liability coverage is unnecessary. What if someone pushes the car, and it winds up rolling down the driveway and into the neighbor's brand-new Mercedes? Collision and theft coverage can be important, too.


Prevent rust. Unpainted metal surfaces, from engine parts to tailpipes, can use a good coat of rust inhibitor.


Protect vinyl, leather and rubber. If the vehicle will be stored in a dry climate, it's wise to apply a preservative to prevent seats, armrests and dash pads from cracking.


Provide critter protection. All kinds of small animals find vehicle wiring, seats and carpet delectable, and they think cars and trucks make a nice den, too. To keep critters out, place mothballs inside a vehicle, including under the dash, and cover the tailpipe. Or, for total protection, store the vehicle inside a cocoon that seals it completely from the elements
 

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not banned
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great stuff from Miesk.
when i did this, i used an oil film that i bought from a marine store. pulled all the plugs, sprayed the mist in and ran bumped the starter to get a good lube on. only problem.. a mouse moved in.

the first time i had to do it, the base long term attendants had a program where you paid like.. $5/m and they moved the car each few weeks or so. worked out well.
 

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FSB's Dirty Jersian
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I would go into the fuse box and pull the main fuse just in case. I know it's on base yada yada, but when I leave my cars sitting for extended periods of time, pulling the main fuse disconnects all power from the vehicle. I figured better to be safe than sorry.
 

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Sway Is My Fan Club.
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I would go into the fuse box and pull the main fuse just in case. I know it's on base yada yada, but when I leave my cars sitting for extended periods of time, pulling the main fuse disconnects all power from the vehicle. I figured better to be safe than sorry.
That's a good idea. I was thinking, pull the rotor button from the distributor. It'll spin over, but not start...if they're just looking for a quick get away won't think to pull the cap and check for fire. You can also pull the coil wire. Another idea I just had, you can manually trip the inertia switch, should be behind the passenger side kick panel.

Also, the Sta-bil is a must. I need to get some for my F100, even though it's only "put up" for a few months during winter. I do try to drive it on nice days at least once a month, or try to start it up and let it idle.
 

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FSB's Dirty Jersian
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Also, the Sta-bil is a must. I need to get some for my F100, even though it's only "put up" for a few months during winter. I do try to drive it on nice days at least once a month, or try to start it up and let it idle.
Yes absolutely, good call. I didn't even think about that. I effed up and didn't use stabil and it was a pain to drain the gas tank and have to refill with fresh fuel. Plus it's good for 2 years more than enough time for deployment and return.
 

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Sway Is My Fan Club.
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OH! And if you empty the gas tank and store it in the truck, leave the windows cracked! Actually, don't do it at all. Vapors from gas are very dangerous, even if the tank is empty. Just leave the tank alone til you get back and ready to replace it.
 

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When I went out for a few months at the time, I'd always block my vehicle up off the tires and run the Sta-Bil in the tank. I made it a point to run it for the week before I put it up and then refilled the tank and added another bottle to the fresh fuel and never had a problem with it. I also mothballed the interior/trunk/engine bay and then covered it. I only had the cheap blue fabric covers at the time so I also cut out cardboard to fit in all the windows to help keep the sun out of the interior while it sat in the on base lot. I used blocks instead of jack stands because I was always worried about the stands sinking into the ground over time.
 

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Chillin on the Gulf Coast
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Discussion Starter #10
The battery is most likely going to be hooked up to a solar power float charger and will be completely disconnected from the vehicle. I will throw some stabil in the tank before I store it as well. As for the other tank, I am around enough gas fumes at work that having some in my bronco will not bother me. Good info on the oil as well Miesk! I will do a oil change before I store the truck and my Jeep. Inside the cab and in the engine bay will be mothballs and cotton balls soaked in peppermint oil. I will change the oil in both vehicles after I park them and then not run them until I get back. They will also be on jack stands with something solid underneath them. Thanks for the help everyone!
 

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one thing to keep in mind is that a full tank will gather/absorb/collect(what ever) lest moisture over the time is waiting(less air space for water to be in).

Instead of oiling the cylinders, i would just spray in some staybill fogging oil(i think thats what its called) it will do the same thing.
 

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Sway Is My Fan Club.
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I am around enough gas fumes at work that having some in my bronco will not bother me
I wasn't talking about the smell. I was talking about the vapors building up and the dang thing exploding. Kinda like a red gas can in the summer that expands with the heat. Its gotta have a valve, a way to get out....leaving the windows cracked.
 

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What would you guys (and gals) recommend for a truck sitting in storage inside for 2 1/2 years, full tank of gas treated with stabil. I'm thinking I'll have to drain the tank. Efi engine.
 

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use fogging oil in the motor, the rest sounds like you know what your doing
 

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Chillin on the Gulf Coast
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Discussion Starter #15
I read up on the fogging oil a bit and I will use it instead. The only previous knowledge that I had with bedding down a vehicle was from my old neighbor. He bedded down an old toyota pickup after he blew the transmission with a new motor. He just filled the cylinders with oil though. But that was years ago and that was just the way that old timers did it for cheap. But that man also knew how to keep old machinery running. He pulled a saw mill out of the swamp that had not been used in 75 years and got it running. That was before I was born and the thing is still going strong.
 

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heck my first trip to the box i treated the fuel tied a cover over it and walked away. got back state side, put a battery in it and fired it up. did the whole tune up later, but had no issue.
 
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