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Discussion Starter #1
So im in my second semester of automotive classes and we just started electrical yesterday. My teacher DOES not give extra credit so today i guess he though it would be funny to offer this question which im sure he though nobody would get. What im posting for is help on this question, a free answer would be great but id also like atleast a slight explanation. Even if someone just got me started and didnt answer it i would greatly appreciate it. ( We have only did basic high school electricity so far..)



- Volts and amps with arrows represent where we must state the amps and volts in that part of the circuit.
-R is ofcourse resistance
-The horribly drawn swiggly lines are resistors

Too anyone who views this thread and took automotive in college, in general is this about as hard as electricity got or even harder?:tinfoil
 

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Discussion Starter #2
To add on i know ohms law and how to find watts, e, i , and r in series and parallel circuits but this is way past my knowledge.
 

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i'm pretty sure that the voltage drop across R3 is 12V. I'm a little rusty on parallel (and series-parallel) circuits. i also believe that the total resistance of R1 and R2 is 6 ohms (product over sum method). IF i'm correct so far, that would give you 2 amps on the far right side of the circuit and up to R3. 2 amps times 18 ohms give you 36V.... DAMNIT! that can't be right. The circuit is only a 12 volt circuit. I used to be able to do this--i swear! good luck.
 

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Never took any automotive electrical, but electronics gets way, way more complex. And of course I have forgotten it all now. And I always hated algebra & that kinda stuff.
And actually that is a simple circuit, as far as series/parallel circuits go. I had an instructor who was totally whacked out on them and made up some that covered an entire blackboard for weekly quizzes. Good luck, study hard & pay attention in class & you can do good.
 

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shibby
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That's pretty simple to figure out but I won't do the calculations for you.

First off, I will rename the 18 ohm resistor to R4 since there is already another R3 shown.

R1 and R2 are in parallel.
Parallel value of R1/R2 is in series with R4.

Series value of R1/R2/R4 is in parallel with R3.
 

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Wrenching for a Livin'
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thats not too hard, dustball has got it laid out nicely for you.

As far as automotive electrical...thats about as complicated as my tech college heavy truck classes got. In the real world, it depends on what you do. Tuning fuel injection systems uses similar math, but gets more compilated, with algebra. You need to have a good understanding of the differences between voltage, resistance, and amperage. The oscilloscope will blow your mind the first time you use it, but once you understand it, its handy.

Basically, it gets about as complicated in the real world as you want it to be.(whatever area you decide to go into) In college...you will probably master ohms law and that will be about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dustball: 1.Thank you i got most of it (i think) just from your post.
2. Resistance total for R1 and R2 is 6 ohms, For R4 its 24, and for R3 its 1.8~. Does that sound about right? ( i started figuring amperage and voltage but i just want to make sure im still on the right track)
MKT: If im right then your first parts are right too (IF im right lol)
Cs79: I just hope my instructor isnt like yours
magnumpi: good to know, after i messed with it for a minute its not tooo bad.
Northernguy: yea i have no idea how that happened:doh0715: i went to off topic section and came back to type up the post but im sure i started off in the off topic section. I dont know how i moved it so much
 
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