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Alright guys, today's problem is transmission overheating. On my way home from vacation, my trans started leaking fluid out of the bell housing hole. From my research I've concluded its a seal. This seal can fail if it overheats but will get back in shape after it cools down. Now to avoid this problem again I'd like to put a beefy trans cooler system. I assume larger tires at highway speeds creates a lot of heat. Anywho, any info or suggestions would be helpful. BTW what's the purpose of an external transmission filter? Ease of access or something else.
 

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transmission output -> a/c condenser -> stock heat exchanger -> 10"x10"ish cooler off a truck or Bronco with the tow package -> transmission input

That should cool pretty much anything you can throw at it and then some but you need to not have A/C or find a way to fit two condensers in that space to be able to pull it off...
 

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transmission output -> a/c condenser -> stock heat exchanger -> 10"x10"ish cooler off a truck or Bronco with the tow package -> transmission input

That should cool pretty much anything you can throw at it and then some but you need to not have A/C or find a way to fit two condensers in that space to be able to pull it off...
What does the AC condenser have to do with this? Why would he need to install 2 condensers? :scratchhe
 

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What does the AC condenser have to do with this? Why would he need to install 2 condensers? :scratchhe
He's talking about using an AC condensor as a giant transmission cooler. That's really only something worth doing if you lack ac and have a condensor sitting there. You can get smaller and much better coolers than that. An AC condensor is basically just a giant tube and fin cooler which aren't very effective. A stock style plate and fin cooler is plenty for most trucks.

Being a 91 you may have a small factory cooler.

In this case you can just bolt in a larger cooler from a later model truck.
Highway speeds are where your transmission will stay coolest as you have good airflow and the torque converter is locked.
This is the setup you want:
Trans>radiator>cooler>trans
 

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He's talking about using an AC condensor as a giant transmission cooler. That's really only something worth doing if you lack ac and have a condensor sitting there. You can get smaller and much better coolers than that. An AC condensor is basically just a giant tube and fin cooler which aren't very effective. A stock style plate and fin cooler is plenty for most trucks.

Being a 91 you may have a small factory cooler.

In this case you can just bolt in a larger cooler from a later model truck.
Highway speeds are where your transmission will stay coolest as you have good airflow and the torque converter is locked.
This is the setup you want:
Trans>radiator>cooler>trans
Going wheeling in 4 low on a hot day, or stuck in traffic, you might also want to consider this, which I used as a puller fan behind the tranny cooler:





get yourself a good gauge too:

 

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He's talking about using an AC condensor as a giant transmission cooler. That's really only something worth doing if you lack ac and have a condensor sitting there. You can get smaller and much better coolers than that. An AC condensor is basically just a giant tube and fin cooler which aren't very effective. A stock style plate and fin cooler is plenty for most trucks.
The old style coolers were tube and fin. The newer ones are basically thin radiators which might technically still be tube and fin but it's a heck of a lot better than your typical "snake a line through a bunch of sheet metal" style cooler.

Even if isn't the most efficient type of cooler (but it's massive so it still cools really well) but it bolts right, gets plenty of airflow from the stock fan and takes up very little space so you're free to install whatever other cooler you want. The cheap ones can be had new for less than $40. I cut off the O-ring tube ends and flared the tube.

This is the setup you want:
Trans>radiator>cooler>trans
The important part is that it passes through the radiator before it passes through whatever your last air-based cooler is. There are several reasons for this. One of them is that it helps the vehicle warm up faster, if your trans fluid temperature spikes it goes through the fluid/fluid style exchanger first, the bigger the difference, the more heat gets transferred to the coolant and the rest of the cooling system deals with it from there, this is most important when there isn't much air flowing over the second transmission cooler (like flooring it from stop light to stop light on a hot day).


What types of fittings do I need and how do I install the temp unit on the transmission?
IIRC there's a port for it.

If you want to control a fan you need to look up a temperature switch (either for a fan or a idiot light) that grounds at the proper temperature and use it to control a solenoid/relay for a fan. IIRC Hayden/4Seasons lets you search by specification on their catalog.

If you're looking for a temperature display the least invasive way I can think of would be getting one for the stock temperature gauge and using a relay to switch the circuit between the two. You may want to tee it into the return line instead depending on what you're trying to do. For the rest of the plumbing, just bite the bullet and learn to work with flared tube, it's about $20 in tools and well worth it.
 

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Arse, I have one of these coolers and they work real good. problem ?
Sorry if that came off more obnoxious than intended. I don't doubt it works, but I don't think that "just buy product X that company Y sells" is good advice, especially when it's the only advice given. I think it would be better to let OP reach those sorts of conclusions on his own. If you had mentioned convenient fitment, that it's really easy to make brackets for or some other insight I'd have probably not typed out a wise ass reply. IMO, one of the things that makes this forum nice is that it's relatively devoid of people answering questions with "give so-and-so at whatever a call, they'll be able to figure something out for you" and "some vendor/sponsors sells something that does that" that are somewhat more common on other forums.
 

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Granted. I own the big B&M coolers and my E40D does not ever run hot or even close to it.
 

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The important part is that it passes through the radiator before it passes through whatever your last air-based cooler is. There are several reasons for this. One of them is that it helps the vehicle warm up faster, if your trans fluid temperature spikes it goes through the fluid/fluid style exchanger first, the bigger the difference, the more heat gets transferred to the coolant and the rest of the cooling system deals with it from there, this is most important when there isn't much air flowing over the second transmission cooler (like flooring it from stop light to stop light on a hot day).
This is dependent on where you live. In areas that see extreme heat for many days/weeks per year, bypassing the radiator is advised. In these areas, the systems are in constant contradiction of each other when tied together. Separating them allows you to address and control heat issues of each system independently. I lived in Phx and had much better results in both systems when I separated the them and used plate style (2 stock Explorer) coolers. I was able to keep my trans temp at desired levels, even in the middle of the summer when rock crawling. The trans still warmed up during the winter months as well, although would NOT during shorter drives. Over time, in cold climates, this could become an issue and so the trans should be tied to the radiator.

IIRC there's a port for it.
Yup. E4ODs have a port on the drivers side (pressure port I do believe). Most gauges will come with the required adapters for installation.

If you want to control a fan you need to look up a temperature switch (either for a fan or a idiot light) that grounds at the proper temperature and use it to control a solenoid/relay for a fan. IIRC Hayden/4Seasons lets you search by specification on their catalog.
This would be the best way to do it however, a fan could be wired into a relay and toggle that could be activated from the cab. I didnt have a fan on mine and in the 5-6 years I wheeled with the coolers, I can think of 3 times where the trans got hotter than I wanted. This was during extreme heat and extreme abuse of the trans. For me, a fan wired to a toggle would have been fine. I had a pillar gauge mount and had my trans gauge in that so it was always visible, it would have been easy to ID that it was time to switch the fan on and cool it down.

If you're looking for a temperature display the least invasive way I can think of would be getting one for the stock temperature gauge and using a relay to switch the circuit between the two. You may want to tee it into the return line instead depending on what you're trying to do. For the rest of the plumbing, just bite the bullet and learn to work with flared tube, it's about $20 in tools and well worth it.
As mentioned, I used a pillar gauge mount, mounted mine there and ran it to the port on the E4OD. Quick, easy, clean, visible and left room for other qauges (I had my engine temp in there as well, and there was still one spot left). The main thing here is that whatever gauge you use have a numeric value. Its important to see the actual temp that the trans is running.

If I was to do this all over again, I would use a single, large B&M cooler, put a fan behind it and run it to a toggle in the cab. I would use the same gauge set up that I did.
 

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This is dependent on where you live. In areas that see extreme heat for many days/weeks per year, bypassing the radiator is advised. In these areas, the systems are in constant contradiction of each other when tied together. Separating them allows you to address and control heat issues of each system independently.

I lived in Phx and had much better results in both systems when I separated the them and used plate style (2 stock Explorer) coolers. I was able to keep my trans temp at desired levels, even in the middle of the summer when rock crawling. The trans still warmed up during the winter months as well, although would NOT during shorter drives. Over time, in cold climates, this could become an issue and so the trans should be tied to the radiator.
The main benefit of the cooler in the radiator is that one fluid can't drastically increase in temperature without at least somewhat raising the temperature of the other. Flooring it between stoplights on a hot day in Florida or 4x4ing in death valley are probably the worst places not to have the systems tied together. There's really no overall downside to tying them together.



This would be the best way to do it however, a fan could be wired into a relay and toggle that could be activated from the cab. I didnt have a fan on mine and in the 5-6 years I wheeled with the coolers, I can think of 3 times where the trans got hotter than I wanted.

This was during extreme heat and extreme abuse of the trans. For me, a fan wired to a toggle would have been fine. I had a pillar gauge mount and had my trans gauge in that so it was always visible, it would have been easy to ID that it was time to switch the fan on and cool it down.
Granted most of that is personal preference, but the fan that Ford put there does the job pretty well... especially if your transmission fluid is also going through the radiator. I'd still much rather automate the fan (if I had to use an electric one) and have a manual override if necessary.


As mentioned, I used a pillar gauge mount, mounted mine there and ran it to the port on the E4OD. Quick, easy, clean, visible and left room for other qauges (I had my engine temp in there as well, and there was still one spot left). The main thing here is that whatever gauge you use have a numeric value. Its important to see the actual temp that the trans is running.
You can play around with resistors to make the "NORMAL" range apropriate for both. As long as you have one or two points of reference (i.e. some letter = some temperature) the stock gauge is fine. I have 3 gauges in my a-pillar so I don't really want to find a place to add another. IMO seeing a numeric value for transmission temp is probably least important because the value can be so different at different points. Doesn't matter if the fluid is ok in the pan if it's so hot that it's starting to break down when it leaves the torque converter.

If I was to do this all over again, I would use a single, large B&M cooler, put a fan behind it and run it to a toggle in the cab. I would use the same gauge set up that I did.
I'd keep my A/C condenser arrangement...
 

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The main benefit of the cooler in the radiator is that one fluid can't drastically increase in temperature without at least somewhat raising the temperature of the other. Flooring it between stoplights on a hot day in Florida or 4x4ing in death valley are probably the worst places not to have the systems tied together. There's really no overall downside to tying them together..
I dont see how increasing both systems temperatures is a benefit unless it is in a cold region and they are both being used in conjunction to reach normal operating temperatures quickly. How is running the engine at 195, then in 130 degree heat, having your trans be impacted by the engine heat (which is how it happens when they are tied together) a benefit?

Like I said, I wheeled my Bronco, hard, in the middle of the summer in Phx Arizona. I know what high heat, high demand is about. What I also know is that when tied together, the trans ran hot (195-210). When separated, it ran cooler (between 160 and 180) and could have been further controlled by a fan.

Granted most of that is personal preference, but the fan that Ford put there does the job pretty well... especially if your transmission fluid is also going through the radiator. I'd still much rather automate the fan (if I had to use an electric one) and have a manual override if necessary.
I agree the Ford fan does a good job. My coolers were mounted in front of the radiator and used the air from the fan for cooling. I attribute that to the cooler trans temps. I also agree that I would rather have it automated with a manual override (that would be the best way), but an automatic switch is not the only way to do it, nor is it necessary to successfully use a fan to increase flow when needed. A single manual switch and a semi observant driver could easily ID when the fan needed to be switched on if only a manual switch were utilized.

You can play around with resistors to make the "NORMAL" range apropriate for both. As long as you have one or two points of reference (i.e. some letter = some temperature) the stock gauge is fine. I have 3 gauges in my a-pillar so I don't really want to find a place to add another. IMO seeing a numeric value for transmission temp is probably least important because the value can be so different at different points. Doesn't matter if the fluid is ok in the pan if it's so hot that it's starting to break down when it leaves the torque converter.
Yup, a person could mess with resistors, get it all set up, determine where in the gauge is the appropriate temp range etc etc. Or, they could buy a numeric gauge, install it and be done. To me, a numeric value for the trans is very important because its the temperature by which you can begin to determine if damage is likely to occur to the trans. The port in the E4OD puts the gauge sensor in the body of the trans, the most important place to monitor the temp. I dont care what the temp is in the cooler, or the lines or what the average temp of both system is. I care what the temp of the trans is. Thats why I installed mine there.

Based on the chart below, I determined that I wanted my trans to run no hotter than 180. At 190, I would monitor it closely and at 195, I would shut it down. With the systems tied, I saw temps at or above 195 regularly when wheeling. When separated, I only saw 195 + a few times.



In the winter, it ran a bit on the cool side, but that was only a few months a year there so it was not a big concern...
 
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