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I need to replace my front brake pads. I can get them off and everything, but i remember someone telling me about bleeding the breaks. Is this really neccisary? Thanx guys
 

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Not if your just doing the pads. Old ones out, new ones in. Simple. Doesn't hurt to use a little brake pad grease on the backs of the pads. Also be sure to get the retaining clip back in there or you will get a little rattle when you hit the brakes.
 

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scrounger extrordinaire
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if you ever need to bleed your brakes, those little one man bleeders are great. you can get speed bleeders to replace the stock bleeders too.
 

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The only time that bleeding the lines is necessary is when ever you break a line... as in disconnecting the line from the caliper, new master cylinder, etc etc. Anything that involves opening up the pressure side of the sealed brake system to the atmosphere.
 

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No, if your just replacing pads, as has been stated here.

You will need to push the caliper piston in tho, as the new pads will
undoubtably be thicker. I use a large c-clamp/1" block of wood for this
operation. Piece-o-cake really. Luck with it. :thumbup
 

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Okay, well I'm going to disagree with everyone so far. First, you will have to have the caliper piston pushed back to fit the new pads over the rotor when you put it back on. Since it will be out from the warn out pads. Now, I know this can be done by taking the cap off of the master cylinder resevour and pushing the piston back in. However, I've had bad luck doing it, so I try to avoid it. Anyways, bleeding breaks is easy, a little messy but easy. If you can get the piston back in without opening the bleed valve, you are doing better then I, but I've broken more then one piston trying and refuse to try anymore, calipers are expensive.

One suggestion, for either way you try (i.e. opening the bleed valve, or just trying to force the fluid back in the resevouir. Leave the inside break pad (the one that is against the piston) on to take the force of pushing the piston. You can use a C-clamp or some adjustable pliars. But don't push directly on the piston, the break easily.

Beyond that, if you decide to bleed, start with the tire farthest away from the master cylinder and move in closer. So if you do all 4 tires, do back passanger, back drivers, front passanger, front driver. Also, the easiest way I've bleed breaks (though it is messy) loosen the bleed valve, close it, have some one pump the petal three times holding it down on the last one, open the bleed valve, fluid shoots out, close valve, have then release the break, repeat. Do this until there is a steady stream of fluid with no spitting or air. Or, use some rubber hose, attach to the bleed valve, put other end in clear container with some break fluid in it. Have someone pump breaks until there is no air bubbles coming out of the end of the rubber hose (which is submerged in break fluid, thus allowing you to see any air).

Anyways, good luck.
 

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SMOOTH said:
If you can get the piston back in without opening the bleed valve, you are doing better then I, but I've broken more then one piston trying and refuse to try anymore, calipers are expensive.
No $hit? Not doubtin' ya, as I've "virtually" known ya for some time and your
no newbie when it comes to these things.

SMOOTH said:
One suggestion, for either way you try (i.e. opening the bleed valve, or just trying to force the fluid back in the resevouir. Leave the inside break pad (the one that is against the piston) on to take the force of pushing the piston. You can use a C-clamp or some adjustable pliars. But don't push directly on the piston, the break easily.
This is why I use the block of wood. I've never broken a piston, but my dad
showed me many years ago this technique, and I imagine this is the reason.
The old inside pad could be used as well, like you stated.
 

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I've always just used the old pad and a C-Clamp to push the piston back. Be slow or the brake fluid will shoot out. Never had to give it any pressure/force to get the piston back in.
 

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94bronco said:
I've always just used the old pad and a C-Clamp to push the piston back. Be slow or the brake fluid will shoot out. Never had to give it any pressure/force to get the piston back in.
Neither have I. The pads are a simple pull the old/put on the new. BUT,

I will agree that somewhere along the line everyone should flush/fill the brake fluid (bleed all four thoroughly) due to fluid comtamination (mainly moisture absorption). It happens over time, no matter what. since bleeding the brakes is pretty easy, this should be done every few years, IMO.
 
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