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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I am not sure what is going on I replaced my turn signal switch think it would fix the break like and hazards but it didn't. With out the car started the break light fuse doesn't blow but once I turn it on and drive a but it pops. Any help is appreciated as I am not sure where to start looking other then ripping the dash out to see all the wires. It's a 88 bronco with title steering and has cruise control.

Tia
 

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Yo Forest_man_bonco,
For now;
Troubleshooting with a Self-Powered Test Light or Multi-Meter (ohmmeter) General
NOTE: Never use a self-powered test light to perform checks for opens or shorts when power is applied to the circuit under test. The test light can be damaged by outside power.
1.Isolate the circuit from power and ground.
2.Connect the self-powered test light or ohmmeter ground clip to a good ground and probe any easy-to-reach point in the circuit.
3.If the light comes on or there is continuity, there is a short somewhere in the circuit.
4.To isolate the short, probe a test point at either end of the isolated circuit (the light should be on or the meter should indicate continuity).
5.Leave the test light probe engaged and sequentially open connectors or switches, remove parts, etc. until the light goes out or continuity is broken.
6.When the light goes out, the short is between the last two circuit components which were opened.

Brake On/Off (BOO) Switch & Lights, Back-Up, License, Hazard Flash, Turn, Dome, etc. Wiring Diagram in 87-91 Bronco & F Series by AutoZone®

Multi function switch shown is the Turn Signal Switch

Turn Signal Switch Replacement & Repair Info w/Tilt Wheel in an 89; similar to 80-91
"...The white plastic that takes up half the column is the turn signal switch. The red box in the top right is the steering wheel lock. When you turn the key, it goes down. The switch is only held down by two screws. One where my screw driver is, and another, same spot, on the bottom. When I removed by wheel, I saw my top screw sitting at the bottom of the column. Once I put the screw back in and tightened them both up, everything was fine. The switch now stays in place, and the lever is now able to push the tilt bar backwards, releasing the wheel. I didn't have to replace my switch, but you see how easy it is now if you must do it. I thought about it - everything's off right now...spend 30 bucks and never think about this again... But then again it took me 10 minutes to get to the switch - I'll save my 30 and go drop it at poker. Check out last photo... If your turn signal does not snap back after turning, read on. Wanted to quickly explain how that works. When you lit the lever, the switch locks in place (green box in pic). There is a little ring around the steering shaft. As you turn, that ring rotates around the shaft until a little block on the ring hits an arm (red box) and the arm releases the lock. When my whole switch was loose, it moved the ring up the shaft a bit, and the little block wasn't hitting the arm. If your lever doesn't snap back after a turn, either the ring moved up, or the plastic lever and/or arm on the switch broke..."
Source: by Brahma502 at SuperMotors.net
Turn Signal Switch Repair; similar to 80-91
"...On the pre-1992, you also have the option of replacing the broken piece separately for about $9.99 with a Dorman 49301. I wouldn't do it, but, I broke mine the last time I put it back together and failed to align the alignment pin which cocked the switch and broke the cancel function..."
Source: by j. r. Nice (J. R. N)
 

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Registered
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yo Forest_man_bonco,
For now;
Troubleshooting with a Self-Powered Test Light or Multi-Meter (ohmmeter) General
NOTE: Never use a self-powered test light to perform checks for opens or shorts when power is applied to the circuit under test. The test light can be damaged by outside power.
1.Isolate the circuit from power and ground.
2.Connect the self-powered test light or ohmmeter ground clip to a good ground and probe any easy-to-reach point in the circuit.
3.If the light comes on or there is continuity, there is a short somewhere in the circuit.
4.To isolate the short, probe a test point at either end of the isolated circuit (the light should be on or the meter should indicate continuity).
5.Leave the test light probe engaged and sequentially open connectors or switches, remove parts, etc. until the light goes out or continuity is broken.
6.When the light goes out, the short is between the last two circuit components which were opened.

Brake On/Off (BOO) Switch & Lights, Back-Up, License, Hazard Flash, Turn, Dome, etc. Wiring Diagram in 87-91 Bronco & F Series by AutoZone®

Multi function switch shown is the Turn Signal Switch

Turn Signal Switch Replacement & Repair Info w/Tilt Wheel in an 89; similar to 80-91
"...The white plastic that takes up half the column is the turn signal switch. The red box in the top right is the steering wheel lock. When you turn the key, it goes down. The switch is only held down by two screws. One where my screw driver is, and another, same spot, on the bottom. When I removed by wheel, I saw my top screw sitting at the bottom of the column. Once I put the screw back in and tightened them both up, everything was fine. The switch now stays in place, and the lever is now able to push the tilt bar backwards, releasing the wheel. I didn't have to replace my switch, but you see how easy it is now if you must do it. I thought about it - everything's off right now...spend 30 bucks and never think about this again... But then again it took me 10 minutes to get to the switch - I'll save my 30 and go drop it at poker. Check out last photo... If your turn signal does not snap back after turning, read on. Wanted to quickly explain how that works. When you lit the lever, the switch locks in place (green box in pic). There is a little ring around the steering shaft. As you turn, that ring rotates around the shaft until a little block on the ring hits an arm (red box) and the arm releases the lock. When my whole switch was loose, it moved the ring up the shaft a bit, and the little block wasn't hitting the arm. If your lever doesn't snap back after a turn, either the ring moved up, or the plastic lever and/or arm on the switch broke..."
Source: by Brahma502 at SuperMotors.net
Turn Signal Switch Repair; similar to 80-91
"...On the pre-1992, you also have the option of replacing the broken piece separately for about $9.99 with a Dorman 49301. I wouldn't do it, but, I broke mine the last time I put it back together and failed to align the alignment pin which cocked the switch and broke the cancel function..."
Source: by j. r. Nice (J. R. N)
I will be honest I am not really sure what any of this mean. I guess I'll have to follow the wires to see if there is a short somewhere
 

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Registered
Joined
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29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yo Forest_man_bonco,
For now;
Troubleshooting with a Self-Powered Test Light or Multi-Meter (ohmmeter) General
NOTE: Never use a self-powered test light to perform checks for opens or shorts when power is applied to the circuit under test. The test light can be damaged by outside power.
1.Isolate the circuit from power and ground.
2.Connect the self-powered test light or ohmmeter ground clip to a good ground and probe any easy-to-reach point in the circuit.
3.If the light comes on or there is continuity, there is a short somewhere in the circuit.
4.To isolate the short, probe a test point at either end of the isolated circuit (the light should be on or the meter should indicate continuity).
5.Leave the test light probe engaged and sequentially open connectors or switches, remove parts, etc. until the light goes out or continuity is broken.
6.When the light goes out, the short is between the last two circuit components which were opened.

Brake On/Off (BOO) Switch & Lights, Back-Up, License, Hazard Flash, Turn, Dome, etc. Wiring Diagram in 87-91 Bronco & F Series by AutoZone®

Multi function switch shown is the Turn Signal Switch

Turn Signal Switch Replacement & Repair Info w/Tilt Wheel in an 89; similar to 80-91
"...The white plastic that takes up half the column is the turn signal switch. The red box in the top right is the steering wheel lock. When you turn the key, it goes down. The switch is only held down by two screws. One where my screw driver is, and another, same spot, on the bottom. When I removed by wheel, I saw my top screw sitting at the bottom of the column. Once I put the screw back in and tightened them both up, everything was fine. The switch now stays in place, and the lever is now able to push the tilt bar backwards, releasing the wheel. I didn't have to replace my switch, but you see how easy it is now if you must do it. I thought about it - everything's off right now...spend 30 bucks and never think about this again... But then again it took me 10 minutes to get to the switch - I'll save my 30 and go drop it at poker. Check out last photo... If your turn signal does not snap back after turning, read on. Wanted to quickly explain how that works. When you lit the lever, the switch locks in place (green box in pic). There is a little ring around the steering shaft. As you turn, that ring rotates around the shaft until a little block on the ring hits an arm (red box) and the arm releases the lock. When my whole switch was loose, it moved the ring up the shaft a bit, and the little block wasn't hitting the arm. If your lever doesn't snap back after a turn, either the ring moved up, or the plastic lever and/or arm on the switch broke..."
Source: by Brahma502 at SuperMotors.net
Turn Signal Switch Repair; similar to 80-91
"...On the pre-1992, you also have the option of replacing the broken piece separately for about $9.99 with a Dorman 49301. I wouldn't do it, but, I broke mine the last time I put it back together and failed to align the alignment pin which cocked the switch and broke the cancel function..."
Source: by j. r. Nice (J. R. N)
I mean I get how to trouble shoot I am more wondering if this is a common issue and if so where to start
 

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Premium Member
If it is not a Bronco, it's just not worth driving.....
Joined
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1,878 Posts
I had the same problem once, it turned out the brake pedal switch wires had gotten hot enough to melt the plastic and they had came in contact with each other. I would start there. Another member just recently had this same issue.

You can take all of your bulbs out of your lights and see if the fuse still blows. If it doesn't then you can put your bulbs back in one at a time and see which bulbs causes it to blow and then at least you know which wires you need to trace.

I would start with just the brake light bulbs out first and then if it still pops the fuse then pull out the turn signals and tail light bulbs.

Make sure your trailer wiring connector is not jacked up, that can pop the fuses as well.
 

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I will be honest I am not really sure what any of this mean. I guess I'll have to follow the wires to see if there is a short somewhere
Yo,
As klh95bronco advised, start at the switch,then check bulb sockets.
180856

180857
 
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