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Discussion Starter #1
ok so to start off its an 89 bronco with the 5.0 recently my old friend who thinks he's a mechanic tried to bleed my brakes for me and striped the shit out of the bleeder valves so i had it put in the shop and after they touched it the brakes keep making a claking sound so i bleed them and then the brakes are nice and responsive with no noise for about 10 minutes then the claking sound begins again so what do you guys think the problem could be the sound has gotten worse since i last mesed with them so yesterday i replaced the master cylinder
 

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Roller rockers are gay
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start with taking the wheels off and seeing what's loose.

did you lose your pedal after the sound began?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
no its a bit soft but its still there i took the wheels off and the brake pads are moving with ssome play in an up and down motion and on the left caliper i went ahead and changed the brake hardware for the driver side caliper and now the top sleeve i guess its called you know the ones you have to tap in on both the top of ther caliper and the bottom well the top one keeps slowly coming out so im pretty much lost on that one because before i changed them out they were fine
 

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I'm not sure throwing parts at a problem is the answer until you sort things out BUT anytime you put on a new master cylinder, you need to "bench bleed" it first otherwise you'll never get a good pedal or pressure. You can either use the bleeder plugs that come with the MC or make your own bleeding kit with short (n) looped curved brake lines the loop over into the reservoir with fittings that screw in the side of the MC.
Placing the MC in a vice grip filling the reservoir with fluid, plunging the piston inside until all the air bubbles are gone keeping the reservoir full at all times so as not to draw in more air, put the top on the MC and install it then bleed the system from the farthest bleeder away to the front (Haynes Manual) and you're good to go. Using a pistol grip vaccum self bleeder lets you do the job eniterly by yourself, I had a steep driveway so I'd nose the vehicle down and let gravity help as well.

It sounds like you have the metal/rubber caliper pins so tapping out the "bottom" pin first and with a screw driver pry the caliper off a bit and it will drop down where the top pin will come out by hand. Hang the caliper using a bungee cord off to the side on the coil spring out of the way so you don't crack/damage the flex line. Clean the caliper tracks, caliper pins and the inside brake pad "keeper" and that slot so the pad sits all the way in properly.

Using an old front disc pad and a big C clamp you can "retract" the caliper piston easily so mounting with new pads on you won't fight or struggle, make sure you use "CRC disc brake pad quiet", a pinkish sticky lubricant on the back of the disc brake pads.

The claking sounds to me like either the caliper piston isn't expanding due to lack of pressure with air still in the system so the disc pads are loose in there, check to see if the metal backing plate on the disc pads has come loose, they're only crimped on...

As for the caliper pins you need to look at the ends on the metal and you'll see little "stop/lock bumps" that keep the pins in place once tapped in so the top pin bumps face up, bottom pin bumps face down otherwise they can back out completely and dislodge the caliper out of position causing some serious damage not to mention the inability to "stop" the vehicle....lol lol..replace pins if the metal/rubber is in questionable shape.

Once you get this all sorted out adjust the rear brakes, I do mine on a level garage floor and jack up the vehicle in the center of the differential just a few inches off the floor, key on, parking brake off in neutral so you can turn the wheels and if for any reason the jack fails the BKO won't go anywhere or hurt "anything"....lol lol...
Using a brake spoon expand the shoes all the way out until you can't spin/turn the wheel then retract the shoes enough until you "feel and hear" a slight drag, shoe to drum and repeat the other side.

Also don't forget to use a bit of sand paper on disc pads or shoes to remove and grease etc. and I make X's around the rotor so pads will seat in nicely and do the same with drums but just run the sandpaper around inside a little.

The more attention to detail when doing a brake job extends the life of the disc pads, rotors, brake shoes and drums costing you less in the end.


Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 

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Nvr Been Bnnd
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those are retaining pins, they are cheap, so if you buy a set now and replace em they wont fall out and make a lot more noise later down the road.... ask me how i know....
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ok thanks guess o got my weekend planned out lol i didnt bench bleed the mc so i guess i should do that i just jumped straight to trying to bleed the brakes they hardened up but i think my old one wasnt bench bled cause the brakes always felt kinda sponge like but the thing thats weird is that the brakes were fine until about a year ago when my friend striped the crap out of the bleeder screws so me being stupid took it to a shop to have them removed and they decided to take the liberty of replacing the two calipers and then they began to make the claking sound so ill go ahead and follow your steps thanks again for the help let you know how it goes
 

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New master cylinders out of the box are never "bench bled" by the mfg. so the rule of thumb is do it yourself FIRST and save yourself a lot of aggravation and the brake job will go a lot easier.

Caliper pins are inexpensive but look them over and see what condition they're in, clean and reuse or replace where safety is the issue.


Good Luck ~ :thumbup
 
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