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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In case anyone was wondering, I did pick the BBQ, graciously supplied to FOTM by @Quader1

This thread will showcase my assembly and first few uses of the grill. I grew up eating BBQ'd stuff all year round, so having a good running grill is important to me. Yes, even when it snows.

I had to build the BBQ out on our tiny little patio, since my girlfriend was using the living room/kitchen of our 450 sqft condo.



Opening up the bigger box, we see some paperwork and this nice little manual/recipe book.



I like to remove all of these staples from boxes to avoid snagging my hands on them later by accident. Digging into the box a bit further and checking out some of the parts:



 

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Discussion Starter #2
Opening up the box for the stand, we find that the fastener package rattled apart sometime during shipping, but the parts were fortunately contained inside a box, within the box, so no harm done.



More parts:



The included hex key / Allen wrench is decent, and even has a ball end. However, the screws do not have very deep engagement in their heads, so I ended up using a T25 Torx bit for most of the assembly, and finished tightening them with the non-ball end of the hex key.



To start off assembly, these lower brackets get screwed to one of the leg components. The legs are identical, and the brackets are directional. The rubber feet came pre-attached, although the instructions say they need to be installed.





Next, on the other leg component, the wheel brackets get fastened. I eagerly put too many screws in, and had to take a couple back out. Those screws were for the propane cylinder bracket.







The instructions show installing the upper cradle component by placing it upside down, holding the legs in place on either side, and driving in 8 screws. Since I lack the abundance of limbs that I imagine are required to build it this way, laid one of the legs down, screwed the bracket to it, and then leaned it sideways against the patio railing so that I could insert the next couple screws without stripping the plastic holes. This worked reasonably well.





The wheels go on with the recesses facing each other. For the retaining clip to go on, the axle needs to be pressed in completely. This is do-able by hand, though it is a very snug fit, as it should be since the entire weight of the grill will be on these when moving it around. I dropped one the retaining clips and it fell off the patio, so I will have find a replacement clip.



 

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Discussion Starter #3
The lower rack slips into the brackets previously mounted on the front leg, and attaches to the rear leg using a couple longer fasteners through the upper holes on the wheel brackets.



I plastic shield screws in place to hide the propane tank. This is a similar material to the fenders on my mountain bike, probably PVC. I started with the middle screw on one side, then the other two screws on the same side, then fastened the other side. Finally, this metal bar screws to the back of the front leg. I wouldn't hang more than a rag on this bar, but it does look nice.





The stand is done.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Back to the big box:

I was unable to lift the grill out, as evidenced by the chunks of styrofoam I ripped off. So I ripped the side of the box off instead.



Placing the grill on top of the stand, this bar on the back/bottom of the grill is used to lock it into the cradle. It takes a pretty firm push on both ends to fully click it into place.





I removed these twist ties, since they probably can't handle the heat that will be present in this area.



And I finally got to move things inside, since it was getting dark, and our building does not have lights on the unit patios. I often BBQ using my climbing headlamp. Yes the LEGO Porsche on the shelf is mine, and yes it does match my Bronco...



Placing the grills:



Installing the handle grip:



Drip shield for the grease trap:



Screwing on the front handle:



And these side tables are pretty nifty. They are a hard durable plastic with metal inserts for hanging onto the grill. They sit good and firm, but are very easy to remove. Size is pretty much prefect for a plate on one side, and tongs, knife, beer on the other.





The accessory hangers were included in the box, and use the same mounting method as the side tables.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Grill day!

Got the BUGG moved out onto the patio. The table that was out there is off to storage, and the well-used stainless Nexgrill can get some deserved TLC before being dedicated to camping.



Lining the grease tray with foil saves on clean-up later. They recommend a bit of sand in there too to absorb the mess, but I didn't have any on on hand. Later I'll give that a try. To get the tray out, the locking U-bolt needs to be temporarily pulled disengaged.



Initial light-up:



And on go some burgers, followed by smokies:





Meanwhile, we had some steaks marinating… grilled those up today.




Of coarse, now as I start to read the manual, I see that I should have seasoned the grills first, so I'll do that in the next day or so. Also, I may end up making a stainless bar-type grill to fit it with the same pitch as the Nexgrill one, for 2 reasons:
  • I have a wooden scraper that I would prefer to use rather than a wire brush
  • Its a good excuse to try welding stainless

Really enjoying the BBQ so far, and looking forward to a lot more use!
 

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Very cool!!!
If your going to make a stainless cook top make sure it is really heavy duty. They use cast iron as part of the cooking system as it holds and spread the heat more evenly... you can also see the D shape in the directly over the burners built into the grids Just sayin lol
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks!
Stainless holds heat well enough, its just slower to spread it due to lower thermal conductivity. Also I would have to make a couple drip shields to prevent flare ups if I go that route, since those built in D shapes also keep grease off the burners. In any case, the grill works great as is, so any mods are very low priority at this point. I just can't help wanting to customize things
 

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You lucky sonofagun. That looked like it was straightforward. My bro's grill he bought a couple years ago, it was 'assembled' as a static display our other bro got on employee discount at the Fred Meyer where he works; the idiot who 'assembled' it, did not use all the fasteners, and did not assemble the burners to the valves correctly. So on its first fire-off, I nearly got my hand zorched when the gas came out around the control panel when I hit the igniter button. Plenty of gas was shooting a good-sized flame. Anyway, looks like a great design, hope you enjoy it for a long time. BTW, where in BC are you located? I, of course, am in Everett, just down the I-5 corridor from you.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, it was pretty simple. Didn't have to touch any part of the gas path or the igniter system.

Glad you avoided injury on that, could have been pretty bad. I'm located in Vancouver, but grew up and started my Bronco build in Victoria. Not much a fan of the big city, but its so much easier to go places from here. For all the $$$ I've spent on ferry rides back and forth to the island, I could have upgraded both my diffs to air lockers by now... But the use of my dad's shop has been indispensable.
 
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