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US, 89, 5.8,C6, 1356 BW (manual), 5 Bolt Hub (automatic) No modes like to keep it or
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Discussion Starter #1
I need to get new Camber Bushing's, I had a small problem getting out my driver's side Camber Bushing Problem. I have looked at some posts about camber bushings. Sounds like adjustable is the way to go but some still give a range and some range's very? Some say camber and caster, some just say camber? Also some do not come with a castle nut, while others do (sounded like I would need a new castle nut with an adjustable bushing because they are longer). Found a McQuay-Norris AA3951 caster camber bushing on ebay, with a cross reference I think is the same one BG sells.

Bottom line I have a stock suspension, 33 x12.5, what in the world do I need?
And for my own education why would you need a camber bushing with different ranges? Yes, lift kits and big tires but how does that affect what camber bushing you need?
 

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I need to get new Camber Bushing's, I had a small problem getting out my driver's side Camber Bushing Problem. I have looked at some posts about camber bushings. Sounds like adjustable is the way to go but some still give a range and some range's very? Some say camber and caster, some just say camber? Also some do not come with a castle nut, while others do (sounded like I would need a new castle nut with an adjustable bushing because they are longer). Found a McQuay-Norris AA3951 caster camber bushing on ebay, with a cross reference I think is the same one BG sells.

Bottom line I have a stock suspension, 33 x12.5, what in the world do I need?
And for my own education why would you need a camber bushing with different ranges? Yes, lift kits and big tires but how does that affect what camber bushing you need?
The best bet is to let the alignment shop install the proper bushing. Eliminates the guess work.
 

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I THINK you need the wider range of adjustment when you install a lift kit, yours being stock probably not.
If I remember, the bushing is hard to get to and I have a hard time imagining anyone would take half of the front wheel assemblies apart and flip the bushing possibly a few times for the $75 or so they charge for an alignment. So the hex head bushing that makes it easier, combined with a reputable shot that fully understands what you want is prob the way to go.
 

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US, 89, 5.8,C6, 1356 BW (manual), 5 Bolt Hub (automatic) No modes like to keep it or
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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah the problem is to get it to a shop I need the camber bushing. When replacing my ball joint it snapped in half. So I need to put it in before I can put it back together and take it to shop.

So back to original question what type of adjustable camber bushing.
 

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OP needs to talk to the shop doing the alignment.
I take mine down to Les Schwab Tires and they charge apprx $70 and apprx $30 per bushing needing replacement.

They have explicitly told me that they WILL NOT take any bushing I source on my own. They guarantee the work but they supply the bushing.

If the shop is close by and alignment isn't terribly out of whack you shouldn't have any problem just driving it in.
 

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I THINK you need the wider range of adjustment when you install a lift kit, yours being stock probably not.
If I remember, the bushing is hard to get to and I have a hard time imagining anyone would take half of the front wheel assemblies apart and flip the bushing possibly a few times for the $75 or so they charge for an alignment. So the hex head bushing that makes it easier, combined with a reputable shot that fully understands what you want is prob the way to go.
They don't take half the front wheel assembly apart when doing this. They take the top ball joint nut off and depending on how frozen the bushing is, force the old one out. I have seen them use a air hammer on it and sometimes it comes out in pieces, but they get them out readily.
 

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I would look for a stock type bushing. Your passenger side should have some indication of the amount of camber degrees, so you can duplicate that. Or talk to the alignment shop and have them supply an adjustable bushing you can install and they can adjust when you bring it to them.
 

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US, 89, 5.8,C6, 1356 BW (manual), 5 Bolt Hub (automatic) No modes like to keep it or
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Discussion Starter #8
We have 4x4 custom shop in town I was going to call them tomorrow. I just know there is a markup. They only guarantee 90 days. So why not just get my own. But Pep boys does offer lift time warranty!?!?
 

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Addicted to Junk
85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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Moog k80108 is the adjustable bushing you want. Or something with the same specs, if you dont want moog.
 
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1978 Bronco Ranger XLT, 400/C6 92 K documented miles &1994 Bronco,XLT 85K original miles
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Let the shop do it for the cam install and alignment. 99.9% of us don't have an alignment rack nor parts in stock nor talent to do the work. Pay the money, get the warranty.
 

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85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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Let the shop do it for the cam install and alignment. 99.9% of us don't have an alignment rack nor parts in stock nor talent to do the work. Pay the money, get the warranty.
It's pretty easy to get a good alignment at home. Many many offroaders do it. Simply measure the distance between the front edges of the wheels and the back edges. Make them equal. Then measure top edges and bottom edges the same way. The top should be ever so slightly closer together than the bottoms. Subsequently, some like to toe out, having the front edge measurement slightly larger than the rear measurement.

With an unchanged castor (since it's a solid axle), this SHOULD be easier than doing a TTB.
 

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95 Bronco, 351W, E4OD, 4.56 gears, 35x12.50x15 Patagonia MTs.
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It's pretty easy to get a good alignment at home. Many many offroaders do it. Simply measure the distance between the front edges of the wheels and the back edges. Make them equal. Then measure top edges and bottom edges the same way. The top should be ever so slightly closer together than the bottoms. Subsequently, some like to toe out, having the front edge measurement slightly larger than the rear measurement.

With an unchanged castor (since it's a solid axle), this SHOULD be easier than doing a TTB.
This works great, except when replacing caster/camber cams which effects caster. To be honest, I haven't paid for an alignment on anything other than my camaro in about 10 years. I do all of my toe adjustments by eye in the driveway, but I did alignments full time for several years. Camber is also easy enough to eyeball if it's within reason or out of spec, you can tell if you compare angle vs the rear tire.
 

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85 Bronco, 309ci I6 w/4bbl, np435, 4" lift, 37" Irok NDs, 4.56 w/ Detroit Locker and tru trac
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12,366 Posts
This works great, except when replacing caster/camber cams which effects caster. To be honest, I haven't paid for an alignment on anything other than my camaro in about 10 years. I do all of my toe adjustments by eye in the driveway, but I did alignments full time for several years. Camber is also easy enough to eyeball if it's within reason or out of spec, you can tell if you compare angle vs the rear tire.
Hmm, I completely rebuilt my ttb, and put the adjustable moog k80108 bushings in. That's how I did it, then for ships and giggles, had it professionally aligned. I wasnt perfect, but awful darn close.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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