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Discussion Starter #1
So... still don't have the new Bronco running. I just "cleaned up" the rats nest of wiring that the dude had in there and now that it's cranking correctly and constantly, it's not getting gas. Have gas all the way to the carb but not getting any inside. I'm assuming something is just gunked up from sitting. I can get it started with starting fluid for about two seconds before it dies.

I know this is a lot but I figured it can't hurt to ask. I'm wondering if anyone here has the knowledge and is willing to take the time (post, chat, email) to talk me through taking it (Edelbrock 600) off and partially apart until I fix the problem. I really don't want to have the carb off long because I've got all kinds of critters in my yard that can get under the hood and wreak havoc. Hence the reason I'm asking before I start because I'm worried about screwing it up and having a question posted for weeks before I can get an answer. Not to mention I'm going crazy having this truck for 5 months and still haven't even driven it across my yard.

I've NEVER had an internal carb issue so I've never taken one apart. I'm scared to death to take anything at all off without knowing I have someone that has done this a million times that is willing to walk me through it. I work for myself so I can be available pretty much anytime you are.

I'd be more than willing to document every single part of this and post the finished write up over in the tech section with plenty of pics.
 

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Julie, before disassembling the carb, you might try
disconnecting the fuel line and giving the carb inlet
a blast of compressed air. That might be enough to
break the gunk loose and allow fuel to enter the
float bowl.

Don't put a lot of pressure on it. Use something like
a tire pump with the end taped to the carb inlet.

Are you absolutely certain that fuel is getting up
to the carb?
 

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How do you know fuel's not getting into the carb? Best way to tell is just to pull the fuel line right off the carb, hold a (gasoline safe) container under it, and have someone crank the engine. If gas comes out there, then you know you have gas right to the carb and it's a carb issue.

If it is, it sounds like you're right in that something is plugging it up. I'm not super familiar with the inner workings of an Edelbrock (I have one in my garage, but it needs rebuilt and I've never used it), so I don't know exactly what to pinpoint for you to look at. However, I've taken it apart and looked it over, and they're not a very complex carburetor. I'd get yourself a rebuild kit specifically for your carburetor and a couple of cans of compressed carb cleaner, remove, and rebuild the carb. In the mean time, shove some shop towels into the intake to keep dust, dirt, and animals out.

Take pictures of everything as you take it apart. Disassemble it over a baking sheet or something similar so that if you drop small parts, they won't go too far.
Don't be too intimidated. They seem really complex, but in the end, they're not all that much. The complex part of a carb is in the tuning, not really in the assembly/disassembly.

It might be something you can just unclog, but it wouldn't be a bad idea to just start out with your Bronco on a nicely rebuild carb.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I know I'm getting gas all the way to the carb because I took the fuel line off at the inlet on the carb and it had fresh gas on it. I didn't have someone cranking it while I did it, but I cranked it and then hopped out real quick and checked the line.

RunninOnEmpty: That's a great idea! Since I don't have a bike pump I'm assuming I could just use a thoroughly cleaned airbrush with the compressor on a really low setting. It would probably even be safe to put a little carb cleaner in the airbrush bottle and spray that in there if just the air doesn't work???

AbandonedBronco: I suppose it could be getting in but it's not getting out to where it needs to be once it's in there. I checked at the inlet but also no matter how long I try to start it and pump the gas, I'm not smelling fuel at all even with the air cleaner off.

I printed out a few Edlebrock manuals and diagrams but, like you said, it seems incredibly intimidating. But at this point my options are leave it alone and not drive it until I can buy a new one or take it apart and chance screwing something up and not being able to drive it until I can buy a new one. lol. So I guess there's not much to lose.

I actually think I got someone to help me if air doesn't clean it out. Gonna try the air thing tomorrow and see what happens. Thanks!
 

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I know I'm getting gas all the way to the carb because I took the fuel line off at the inlet on the carb and it had fresh gas on it.

I'd still have someone crank the engine while you hold a container under it. If it's just wet with gas, it's possible that gas is getting to the carb but it's just not enough to fire up the engine and your problem may be a clogged fuel filter, weak pump, junk in the line, etc. etc.

Best of luck on the carb. Nothing quite like learning like diving right in. :toothless Been there, done that, and been successful a few times!
 

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Does it even start? Does it try to start then die? You might just need to dump a little fuel in the carb, start it, and try to get it idle. You most likely have a mechanical fuel pump which runs off the engine rotating, most times, if an old ford carb vehicle has sat for a while you need to pour some gas directly into the carb and crank it to get the fuel to flow under a load. That is what I had to do to mine, dump a little gas, crank, and never looked back.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Does it even start? Does it try to start then die? You might just need to dump a little fuel in the carb, start it, and try to get it idle. You most likely have a mechanical fuel pump which runs off the engine rotating, most times, if an old ford carb vehicle has sat for a while you need to pour some gas directly into the carb and crank it to get the fuel to flow under a load. That is what I had to do to mine, dump a little gas, crank, and never looked back.
Yeah, it tries with starting fluid and then dies. I got a good two to three seconds out if the other day, even got to smell real exhaust for just a second. lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
This is what I got after cranking it six to eight times for about four seconds each time. It almost seemed kind of intermittent, the first times there was nothing. Then a little, then a little more a few tries later and then the last time didn't seem like it added anymore to the bottle. I put both pictures in here because I thought it looked like more was in the bottle in one picture then the other picture, so see for yourself.





 

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That doesn't look like much fuel at all. On my carb'd motor (should be the same psi), if the hose is disconnected from the carb, it'll shoot gas a good 1 - 2 feet with every crank of the engine.

Have you changed out your fuel filters? If so, my next guess would be a bad diaphragm in the fuel pump.
 

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Yep, there's the problem. Probably a bad fuel pump, but check the
neoprene hose going into the pump from the fuel line, and also the
hose at the fuel tank end. Sometimes they swell and clog up from
the inside and restrict fuel flow. Especially in a vehicle that's been
sitting for awhile.

That gas looks very old, but it still should ignite.
 

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run a hose from the suction side of the fuel pump into a gas can.

starter fluid is hard on a engine, your better off using gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Think I'm gonna pick up a new pump today because even if it's not the pump, it's worth the $15 - $20 to have that added security if it decides to crap out on the side of the road somewhere. I've replaced them before and it's a super easy fix. And get new filters for the same reason. Plus, like someone said, it's probably not a bad idea to replace them after sitting a few months. Should have done that from the beginning but the demons of impatience have been setting in with wanting to drive it already, even if it's only to the other side of my yard.

Jopes, gonna use your idea for the sake of getting completely fresh gas in there and getting it at least started.

The rubber hoses really don't "look" that bad. I did take them off and spray cleaner down them the other day to make sure none were clogged. I actually just realized that I already have a few feet of new hose that I had bought for my other 79, so I guess I'll give that a new home on the new one :) (It's all becoming kinda bittersweet. lol)

Oh and the compressor won't reach the truck and won't plug into my handy dandy Christmas light extension cord so I broke down and spent the $2 on a new can of carb cleaner just so I could get the straw for the added pressure :banghead

Glad I posted before I started tearing stuff apart. 5 pounds of pressure just really didn't seem like a lot to me. I assumed because the inlet was wet that everything on that end was good.
 

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Another way to get fuel into the bowl, bypassing the fuel pump, is to pour it into the bowl vent. The bowl vent should be connected to a hose that runs to the charcoal canister if one is hooked up. Otherwise it will be a hose fitting near the top of the carb.

Once you find the bowl vent hole, get a funnel and maybe a short piece of fuel line and pour gas into the bowl. That should be enough to start the engine and run the fuel pump at high enough rpm to get decent volume moving.

Also, anytime you are working with gasoline, have a good sized fire extinguisher handy, or two or three small ones. It sucks when you have a fire and your extinguisher runs out before the flames are put out.
 

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That gas looks very old. I am guessing that if the fuel coming out of the tank looks like that then the fuel that is in the carb varnished the internals. It more than likely would benefit you to rebuild the carb at any rate. Just to make sure that the metering rods and internals are working correctly. It'll make it much easier to tune monce it is running. At any rate I would recommend hooking up a fule pressure guage inline to your carb. in my experience Edelbrock carbs are happy at 5-7 pounds of pressure at the inlet. Also I have had absolutley no luck with the 600 CFM Edelbrocks. I do however love the 750 CFM carbs. Especially for a big block. That niether here nor there though. If the carb hasn't been removed yet you have nothing to loose by pouring a little good fuel down it and trying to fire that bad boy. Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #15


The Bronco is alive as of 4:15 pm today. I just drove him across my yard a few times and it was absolutely awesome! My very first time driving him ever. Can't wait to get him on the street. I never left first gear (except for reverse) but I'm pretty damn impressed with the pull it has. The hood is definitely going to take some getting used to though.

It was the fuel pump. Without looking back at the posts and private messages, I don't remember who suggested checking that before I tore into the carb but that's what got him running, so thank you very much.

The best birthday present just turned into a Christmas present too. This thing is awesome.
 

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Way to go! That's awesome. It's always a fun feeling getting an engine to finally fire up and move a vehicle under it's own power.

Glad you got it running, and it was an easy fix.
 
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