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1995 Bronco EB 5.8L
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting a clank when initially accelerating out of a full stop or coasting at idle speed (e.g. in stop and go traffic). Feels/sounds like it's coming from the rear driveline. Crawled under and checked the rear u joints, have very slight play in the u joint closest to the differential. Also showing two codes, 628 C (excessive converter clutch slippage) and 629 O (converter clutch solenoid circuit fault or lock-up solenoid circuit fault), U joint issue, converter clutch solenoid or both? Or something else? 1995 EB 351 E40D.
 

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Super Moderator
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30,677 Posts
Yo Steevereno,
As so well advised!
"U-Joint Inspection
Prior to checking driveline angularity, inspect the universal joints for proper operation.
Place the vehicle on a frame hoist and rotate the driveshaft (4602) by hand. Check for rough operation or seized universal joints. If the universal joint shows signs of seizure, excessive wear or improper seating, scribe alignment marks on the driveshaft and rear axle companion flange. Remove the driveshaft and remove and replace the universal joint. Install the driveshaft in the marked original position."

"When U-joint yokes are assembled to their shafts in the same plane, they are in phase. When they are assembled to the shafts in different planes, they are out of phase.
To obtain vibration-free operation, check and correct as necessary.
NOTE: On vehicles with a slip spline on the last coupling shaft, the yoke, which is part of the driveshaft slip yoke (4841), should be considered part of the coupling shaft.

Mark splined driveline components prior to disassembly to ensure that they have the same relative orientation when reassembled.

U-Joint Phasing
Rectangle Line Font Parallel Diagram

..."
"Universal Joint TSB 97-20-15 by Ford for 90-96:
ISSUE: Available U-joints for driveshaft service are not always identifiable through model application charts. Some customers may request greaseable U-joints as a personal preference.ACTION: Refer to the following Service Information for availability of U-joint with grease fittings.SERVICE INFORMATIONTO IDENTIFY U-JOINT BY MEASUREMENT:1. Remove the old U-joint.2. Measure U-joint using the following measuring procedure.a. Remove bearing cups.b. Remove excess grease from bottom of bearing cups and trunnions.c. Remove seals from bearing cups and trunnions.d. Reinstall bearing cups on trunnions.e. Measure as follows, permitting a tolerance of ±0.005" at Dimension "G" in Figure 1 with Dimension "D" and "E" at ±0.003".
Figure 1 - Article 97-20-15
3. Identify U-joint part number using reference dimensions in the Light Truck Cross Reference Chart found at the end of this TSB article.TO IDENTIFY GREASEABLE U-JOINT FOR SERVICE:For customers who demand greaseable U-joints due to their specific vehicle duty cycle, refer to Light Truck Cross Reference Chart found at the end of this TSB article.Greaseable U-joints are typically recommended only for vehicles which operate 100% of the time in a high grit environment (e.g., coal mines).NOTE: GREASEABLE U-JOINTS DO NOT CONTAIN END PLAY THRUST WASHERS AND MAY CAUSE NOISE/VIBRATION/HARSHNESS (NVH) CONCERNS ON CERTAIN APPLICATIONS.
OTHER APPLICABLE ARTICLES: NONEWARRANTY STATUS: INFORMATION ONLYOASIS CODES: 509000, 590000, 597997"

by Ford
 

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1990 EB, 5.0
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633 Posts
Remove your rear driveshacft and take it to a diveline shop for rebuild. Should cost $300-400 but they'll replace all the U joints and the double cardone joint. While it is out you should also lube up the slip yoke with the special ford teflon grease. Pick it up at the dealership for $15. While you can probably do all this repair on your own it is a royal PITA, and the money spent at a driveline specialist is wel worth it.
 

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If it is not a Bronco, it's just not worth driving.....
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I had something very similar on my Bronco but could never find the cause of the clanking.

I took it in to have the transmission rebuilt and the transmission shop ( reputable ) found the Transfer case input bearing was shot and was slapping the sides of the case when torque was put on the driver line. That was what caused my clanking noises. They said I was just short of a catastrophic failure and it was fortunate that I brought it in when I did.

Once the Transfer case was rebuilt, that clanking noise that I could never find went away....
 

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'88 XLT. 2" lift, 3G, Saginaw Pump, Headers, High flow 3" cat, 3" exhaust, 6 litre tune, K&N
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512 Posts
You can jack up the rear tires and put the vehicle on jack stands in the rear. Then have somebody spin the wheel hard in forward than in reverse. Go under the car and listen. If you can't tell where the clank is coming from, then put a hand on the rear end, than the transfer case. You will feel the clank if you can't pin point it. You might be able to feel it on the driveshaft if your hand is on it.

If spinning a wheel by hand isn't enough to cause it. You can try starting the engine with the rear end on jack stands, chocking the front wheels then throwing it in drive at idle. I would NOT go under the car but lay down next to the car and try to determine where the sound is coming from. You can take a long cardboard tube, like from Xmas wrapping paper, then stick it to your ear than point it at the u-joint, driveshaft slip joint, transfer case, and rear end and try to pinpoint where the sound is coming from. That works pretty well, it will be a lot louder when the tube is pointing at the source.

It could also be excessive pinion play in the rear differential. Hopefully it is just an old u-joint.
 

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Premium Member
1996 EB, 351w, stock-ish.
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4,325 Posts
when i had a similar issue it was the slip joint in the drive shaft.

 

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274 Posts
when i had a similar issue it was the slip joint in the drive shaft.

Grease the driveshaft slipjoint first before doing anything else. That is usually the problem.
 

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Charlie don't surf..
'92 Ford Bronco XLT
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16,433 Posts
They say to use the Ford stuff, but I've found any good quality chassis luge grease will work fine..the Bronco drive shaft is essentially made up of two parts. The slip yoke is that part in the middle. You'll need to remove the bolts where it bolts into the rear diff as well.

Make sure all 4 of your wheels are chocked when you do this.

Office supplies Gun accessory Cylinder Nickel Metal
 
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1995 Bronco EB 5.8L
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8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
They say to use the Ford stuff, but I've found any good quality chassis luge grease will work fine..the Bronco drive shaft is essentially made up of two parts. The slip yoke is that part in the middle. You'll need to remove the bolts where it bolts into the rear diff as well.

Make sure all 4 of your wheels are chocked when you do this.

View attachment 195946
Gotcha, does it pull all the way apart after removing the boot or do you just lube the exposed part?
 

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The Tennessee Warden
96 XL, built 357W, E4OD, BW1356, D44 SAS, 4.56 gears
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5,532 Posts
Any particular grease type? Sorry to sound dumb but the slipjoint just pulls out of the rear differential after disconnecting the rear driveshaft at the transfer case?
I’ve used regular grease as well with no issues.

No, each end of the driveshaft is secured - one end bolted to the transfer case flange and the other to the pinion flange. The slip yoke is in the driveshaft itself, normally covered by an accordion style boot. Before you remove the boot and pull the two pieces apart (completely apart), use a paint pen or marker and a straight edge to mark each piece on either side of the boot. After you apply grease inside the female end and on the male end, place the boot back on the male end and reassemble the two pieces while lining up the marks you made. This will keep the driveshaft sections in proper phase with one another - not to mention there are often balancing weights on each section.
 

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1995 Bronco EB 5.8L
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8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I’ve used regular grease as well with no issues.

No, each end of the driveshaft is secured - one end bolted to the transfer case flange and the other to the pinion flange. The slip yoke is in the driveshaft itself, normally covered by an accordion style boot. Before you remove the boot and pull the two pieces apart (completely apart), use a paint pen or marker and a straight edge to mark each piece on either side of the boot. After you apply grease inside the female end and on the male end, place the boot back on the male end and reassemble the two pieces while lining up the marks you made. This will keep the driveshaft sections in proper phase with one another - not to mention there are often balancing weights on each section.
Thanks for the advice, friends.
 

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I'm getting a clank when initially accelerating out of a full stop or coasting at idle speed (e.g. in stop and go traffic). Feels/sounds like it's coming from the rear driveline. Crawled under and checked the rear u joints, have very slight play in the u joint closest to the differential. Also showing two codes, 628 C (excessive converter clutch slippage) and 629 O (converter clutch solenoid circuit fault or lock-up solenoid circuit fault), U joint issue, converter clutch solenoid or both? Or something else? 1995 EB 351 E40D.
Mine was the transmission bolts and crossmember loose
 

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The Tennessee Warden
96 XL, built 357W, E4OD, BW1356, D44 SAS, 4.56 gears
Joined
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5,532 Posts
I stand corrected..As many times as I had mine out, I never tried..to pull it apart..
Honestly, it’s probably not a bad idea to NOT pull it apart since it’s so easy to get the u joints out of phase.
 
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