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yo D,
Too bad, and this is about the 5th Code 628 I've seen recently here;
so, hang in there and figure on the TC:thumbup
Go thru this thread bec. GearHead has similar problems and same DTC 628; "...No studdering at all. Drove it 50+ miles today and it drove great. It may drive this way another 5 days and 500 miles. Or I may start it up tomorrow and it will shift hard the first time it changes gears..."
DTC 628; "...I did things in a stupid-simple way when the 628 came up: I tapped into the TCC line, and attached a voltmeter between that line and chassis ground. While driving, I could watch for it to go between zero volts (meaning the PCM was commanding the converter to lock) and battery voltage (meaning the converter should be unlocked). It sounds counterintuitive at first, but that's a matter of perspective, I suppose. Anyhow, if you see the PCM trying to lock the TCC and nothing happens to the engine speed, or if you can give it a little more throttle and the engine speed rises while it's commanded to lock, then you're assured a problem exists. If there was an electrical problem, then the PCM should also be giving you a code 627 as well. The 628 indicates excessive converter slippage. At a steady cruise, say your 60 mph, if you tap the brake the engine speed should rise slightly, and then come back down as the TCC re-engages. This condition can be intermittent, and it's more of a mechanical problem than an electrical one. The fix for a slipping TCC is to replace the torque converter and stator shaft seal, nothing more. You'd be out a little over a hundred bucks probably, and a few hours' labor, if you get one through a reputable transmission shop. I wouldn't buy anything but an OE-type replacement. You may even be able to get a Motorcraft/Ford replacement through a local dealership, but I've no clue how much their price would be..."
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) at DTC 628; "...I did things in a stupid-simple way when the 628 came up: I tapped into the TCC line, and attached a voltmeter between that line and chassis ground. While driving, I could watch for it to go between zero volts (meaning the PCM was commanding the converter to lock) and battery voltage (meaning the converter should be unlocked). It sounds counterintuitive at first, but that's a matter of perspective, I suppose. Anyhow, if you see the PCM trying to lock the TCC and nothing happens to the engine speed, or if you can give it a little more throttle and the engine speed rises while it's commanded to lock, then you're assured a problem exists. If there was an electrical problem, then the PCM should also be giving you a code 627 as well. The 628 indicates excessive converter slippage. At a steady cruise, say your 60 mph, if you tap the brake the engine speed should rise slightly, and then come back down as the TCC re-engages. This condition can be intermittent, and it's more of a mechanical problem than an electrical one. The fix for a slipping TCC is to replace the torque converter and stator shaft seal, nothing more. You'd be out a little over a hundred bucks probably, and a few hours' labor, if you get one through a reputable transmission shop. I wouldn't buy anything but an OE-type replacement. You may even be able to get a Motorcraft/Ford replacement through a local dealership, but I've no clue how much their price would be..."
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) at FSB

Also read Stang's 2 Links he posted.
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DTC 626, 628, 643, 652, P0741, P0743, P1754; "...Coast Clutch Solenoid (CCS) 7M107; The Coast Clutch Solenoid provides coast clutch control by shifting the coast clutch shift valve. The solenoid is activated by pressing the transmission control switch or by selecting the 1 or 2 range with the transmission gearshift selector lever. In manual 1 and 2, the coast clutch is controlled by the solenoid and also hydraulically as a fail-safe to ensure engine braking. In reverse, the coast clutch is controlled hydraulically and the solenoid is not on. NOTE: On certain applications, the coast clutch is controlled by the PCM in the overdrive position (TCS OFF) in gears 1, 2, and 3. Symptoms: Failed on - Third gear engine braking with (D) range selected. Failed off - No third gear engine braking in overdrive cancel..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net

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DTC 62, 628 & 1744 Converter Overheat, High Line Pressure; "...E4OD/4R100 transmissions often have problems with converter overheat, codes 62, 628, 1744, high line pressure and low cooler. The OEM valve can close off critical converter/cooler circuit under high-demand situations, causing the TCC to drag on and glaze the lining at idle, or restricting converter/cooler charge during high load causing converter slip codes, overheat and lube failures. flow. Sonnax now offers an upgraded line-to-lube pressure regulator valve 36424-04K with a patented internal line-to-lube passage with anti-drainback check valve, and a revised balance-end orifice. While drilling the pump casting will allow full-time flow to the cooler circuit, it is not precise and allows converter drainback, causing delayed engagements complaints. A revised balance end orifice is built into the valve and ensures sufficient oil is fed to the end of the PR valve to keep the valve in the proper regulating position and further preventing converter/ cooler flow restrictions. This is a drop in replacement that requires no machining..."
Source: by sonnaflow.com

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Next is;
E4OD Transmission Control Indicator Lamp (TCIL) Flashing Diagnostic Trouble Codes 62, 628 and/or 1728 & transmission shifts hard by Ford for 90-96
in my site @
MARCH 2, 1998
LIGHT TRUCK:
1989-97 F SUPER DUTY, F-250 HD, F-350
1989-98 ECONOLINE, F-150, F-250 LD
1990-96 BRONCO
1997-98 EXPEDITION
1998 NAVIGATOR

This TSB article is being republished in its entirety to correct the vehicles listed.
ISSUE:
Some vehicles may exhibit a flashing Transmission Control Indicator Lamp (TCIL) and Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) 62, 628, and/or 1728 may be stored in memory. These DTCs can be set by any internal transmission element slippage or potentially by torque converter slippage.
ACTION:
Refer to the following text when servicing these codes.
NOTE:
WHEN SERVICING A VEHICLE WITH A FLASHING TCIL WITH DTCS 62, 628 AND/OR 1728, DO NOT REPLACE THE TORQUE CONVERTER UNLESS PROPER DIAGNOSIS HAS PROVEN THE TORQUE CONVERTER TO BE THE CAUSE.

Always verify the customer concern. Proper diagnosis for DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 may require talking to the customer to find out if there were any other symptoms associated with the TCIL flashing, (i.e., shift concerns, erratic/early/late, proper torque converter operation, etc.), prior to noticing the TCIL flashing.
Prior to transmission repairs for DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 or investigating other causes, repair all non-related transmission DTCs first, then repair all other transmission DTCs other than 62, 628 and/or 1728.
Some of the other causes that may result in DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 are as follows:
Aftermarket modifications (i.e., performance enhancers, electrical modifications, etc.)
Missing shifts (some/all)
Transmission fluid leakage (internal and/or external)
Erratic shift timing
Valves, springs or retainers in the main control/accumulator body not assembled correctly, binding or sticking
Check balls missing and/or mislocated. Damaged, unable to seal/seat properly
Higher or lower than normal line pressure
Transmission fluid restrictions and/or level check filter; may have become dislodged
Erratic/inoperative vehicle speed and/or rpm sensor
Poor engine performance concerns
Any vehicle system concerns that could cause the strategy to detect a perceived internal slippage or change in the expected rpm of internal transmission rotating components may cause DTCs 62, 628 and/or 1728 to set.
NOTE:
ONCE DTCs 62, 628 AND/OR 1728 SET, OTHER TRANSMISSION FUNCTIONAL DTCs MAY NOT SET.
 

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penis
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Discussion Starter #3
Well last time it was shifting hard I had to replace my battery as it said low votage so it got rid of the codes it has been a week or 2 now and today just started acting up on me so i pulled codes to day. So I take it I have to replace the torque converter then? BTW the code was voltage to low to CPU or something put my hunch on the battery and that hasn't popped up yet/again. Thanks man you have been a big help though.
 

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yo,
Wait on that TC change.
Did you do both KOEO & KOER portions with engine @ normal op temp for KOER?

IS the OD SWITCH LED (TCIL) blinking?
 

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penis
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Discussion Starter #5
Nope OD switch no blinkee KOEO it should still be near operating temp i can do one KOER. Same steps as before just wait for the engine to be fully warmed.
 

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yeah

also, I run it around, after warmed-up; shift manually thru all gears incl reverse; turn off all accessories; lights, radio, air cond/heater & fan...etc.
then do KOER
 

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ok,
In KOER portion
4 pulsesis da Engine Code so it's an 8 cylinder... which is good so far...

here is da skinny, by Ryan M (fireguy50)
. The first set of flashes you will see is the Engine ID code. For gasoline engines, the engine ID code equals half the number of cylinders (4 pulses = 8 cylinders). Diesel engines have an ID code of 5 flashes. These codes are used to verify the proper PCM is installed and that the KOER Test has begun.
7. After the engine ID code you need to test a few items for the computer. You’re vehicle might not have any or all of these items to test.
a. Brake On/Off (BOO) circuit, the brake pedal MUST be depressed for 1 second and released.
b. Power Steering Pressure (PSP) switch, quickly jerk the steering wheel one-half turn and released. Power Steering Pressure Switch (5.0L Without E4OD Only); The Power Steering Pressure Switch signals the EEC Module when power steering pressure exceeds 350 psi ±50. The engine then increases idle speed to compensate for the additional load. It appears the switch was deleted from the '94 model year. It only shows up in the diagrams until '93. the switch is directly above the steering box." Source: by Sportruk
c. Transmission Control Switch (TCS) for the E4OD or 4R70W auto transmission, press the O/D off button 2 times, turning it ON and OFF.
8. The computer will begin to test many components; you will hear the idle change watch the check engine light closely.
9. After many tests the computer will flash once, indicating a Dynamic Response test. This single flash is prompting you briefly push the gas pedal all the way down (do not over rev the engine).
10. After a little while the check engine light will start flashing codes at you.
11. After you�ve gotten all the codes turn the engine off, and remove the ground wire from the STI.
 

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are you using Ryan or Steve83's KOER process?
SELF TEST - & DTCs; COMPREHENSIVE; miesk5 NOTE, The self-test plugs were mounted on the passenger side fender on 1985-86 EFI trucks; The self-test plugs are located along the driver's side fender behind the air filter box on 1987-95 EFI trucks MIESK5 NOTE; Self-Test Output (STO) is the Pin in the Lt gray Connector and Signal Return Ground (SIGRET) is Pin E in black Connector. Includes Steps to Clear Continuous Memory & Keep Alive Memory (KAM) Codes; & a list of reasons why a technician may see the MIL lamp lit with no accompanying Continuous Memory Self-Test codes; The engine temperature must be greater than 50°F (10°C) to pass the KOEO Self-Test and greater than 180°F (82°C) to pass the KOER Self-Test. Make sure A/C is off and transmission is in Park (automatic) or Neutral (manual), release clutch.
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at http://fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=44736
 

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yo, ok
DTC 538 Insufficient RPM change during dynamic response test. "...This is another code generated when the dynamic response or "goose" test as some refer to it is not performed during the KOER test. The KOER test requires that after a certain length of time the throttle be opened to bring the idle above 2000 rpm for a short period of time. If the dynamic response test is not performed or the rpm's do not peak ABOVE 2000 rpm's this code will be generated. (Computer needs to compare changes in sensor readings at different RPM's to determine system operation and efficiency)..."
Source: by miesk5
 

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How fast does the code come back after you clear it? How is the truck shifting? especially if you go about 60 and take foot off of the gas and let it slow down? is the ECM downshifting? when the battery was low did you just disconnect it and replace? have you checked all your grounds, sensors, ecm etc? I got that code a few times when my ecm was fried. just letting you know.
 

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green ones make me horny
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btw 312 is a an air nor diverting code, yoiur smog pump work?
 

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penis
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Discussion Starter #16
As far as I know it works. With the codes cleared it shift smooth had it on the highway for about 10 miles 65 MPH cruise set last monday and it drove like a dream took it about a week for the codes to comeback.
 

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312 Secondary Air Injection (AIR) misdirected during KOER
ATTEMPT TO ELIMINATE DTC 312
Disconnect vacuum line on AIRD valve (or left AIRB2 valve on 7.0L) and cap vacuum line.
Key off.
Repeat Engine Running Self-Test and record service codes.
Is DTC 312 present?

Yes system ok EEC system OK. REFER to Diagnosis index in Section 13A.
No GO to KC5 .

KC5 CHECK AIRB AND AIRD SOLENOIDS ELECTRICAL OPERATION
DVOM on 20 volt scale.
Enter Output State Diagnostic Test Mode (DTM). Refer to Section 5A , Quick Test Appendix.
Disconnect AIRB solenoid.
Connect DVOM positive test lead to VPWR circuit and negative test lead to AIRB circuit of AIRB vehicle harness connector.
While observing DVOM, depress and release the throttle several times (to cycle output On and Off).
Repeat for the AIRD solenoid.
Does each solenoid circuit cycle 0.5 volt or greater?
YES GO to KC6 .

NO REMOVE jumper. GO to KC10 .

KC6 CHECK AIRB/AIRD SOLENOIDS FOR INTERNAL VACUUM LEAKS
Remain in output state DTM.
Reconnect AIRD/AIRB harness connector.
Vacuum pump connected to the supply port and vacuum gauge connected to the output port of one solenoid.
Apply 15 in-Hg (51 kPa) vacuum and observe gauge.
Repeat steps above for the other solenoid.
Does vacuum gauge reading hold for each solenoid?

Yes GO to KC7 .
No REPLACE AIRB/AIRD solenoid assembly. RERUN Quick Test.

KC10 MEASURE AIRB/AIRD SOLENOID RESISTANCE
Key off.
Disconnect both AIRB/AIRD solenoid connectors and measure both solenoid resistances.
Is each resistance between 50 and 100 ohms?

Yes GO to KC11 .
No REPLACE AIRB/AIRD solenoid assembly. RECONNECT both solenoids. RERUN Quick Test.


KC7 CHECK AIRB/AIRD SOLENOIDS FOR VACUUM CYCLING
Continue in output state DTM.
Install vacuum pump to the AIRB solenoid vacuum supply port and install a vacuum gauge to the AIRB output port.
Apply 15 in-Hg vacuum.
While cycling outputs On and Off (by depressing and releasing throttle), observe the vacuum gauge at the output.
Note: Re-apply vacuum between cycles.
Repeat for AIRD solenoid. Connect vacuum pump to the AIRD solenoid vacuum supply port and connect a vacuum gauge to the AIRD output port.
Cycle output on and off.
Does each solenoid cycle vacuum output on and off?
Yes EXIT Output State DTM, RECONNECT vacuum hoses. REFER to Diagnosis Index in Section 13A.
No REPLACE AIRB/AIRD solenoid assembly. RERUN Quick Test.

KC10 MEASURE AIRB/AIRD SOLENOID RESISTANCE
Key off.
Disconnect both AIRB/AIRD solenoid connectors and measure both solenoid resistances.
Is each resistance between 50 and 100 ohms?

YES go to KC11 .
NO REPLACE AIRB/AIRD solenoid assembly. RECONNECT both solenoids. RERUN Quick Test.



KC11 CHECK CIRCUIT CONTINUITY
Key off.
Disconnect Powertrain Control Module (PCM). Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires, etc. Service as necessary.
Install breakout box, leave PCM disconnected.
Measure resistance between AIRB circuit at breakout box and AIRB circuit at vehicle harness connector.
Measure resistance between AIRD circuit at the breakout box and AIRD circuit at vehicle harness connector.
Is each resistance less than 5.0 ohms?
YES GO to KC12 .
No SERVICE open harness circuit. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT PCM and both solenoids. RERUN Quick Test.


KC12 CHECK FOR SHORT TO GROUND
Key off.
Breakout box installed, PCM disconnected.
Disconnect both AIRB/AIRD solenoids.
Measure resistance between AIRB circuit at the breakout box and Test Pins 40, 46 and 60. Measure resistance between AIRD circuit at the breakout box and Test Pins 40, 46 and 60 at the breakout box.
Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms?
Yes GO to KC13
No SERVICE short to ground. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT PCM and AIRB/AIRD solenoids. RERUN Quick Test.

KC13 CHECK FOR SHORT TO POWER
Key off.
Breakout box installed, PCM disconnected.
Both AIRB/AIRD solenoids disconnected.
Measure resistance between AIRB circuit at the breakout box and Test Pins 37 and 57. Measure resistance between AIRD circuit at the breakout box and Test Pins 37 and 57 at the breakout box.
Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms?

Yes REPLACE PCM. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT both solenoids. RERUN Quick Test.
No SERVICE short to power. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT PCM and AIRB/AIRD solenoids. RERUN Quick Test. If DTC is present, REPLACE PCM.
 

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penis
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Discussion Starter #18
OK just rerand the test and only getting a code 312 noticed that tone line on the AIR pump was broke would this put my tranny in limp mode? Also would this cause a code 628 as well?
 

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yo,
nope, sorry that AIR pump won't have anythang to do w/the 628 OD probs.

Read again what SigEpBlue (Steve) wrote about 628 in the link I posted above' the other Links also involve tranny work, TC replacement and what Stang wrote in same thread (lost 3rd and OD); "...First thing I would do is clean the hell out of the solenoid pack connector...";
help removing e4od solenoid pack
and
E4OD Solenoid Test
 

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Install a tranny temp gauge and see what the temps are but plan on installing a new torque converter. I had the same code with no noticable symptoms but the tranny was running extremely hot. Was in fact the tc going out.
 
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