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1978 Bronco, 1996 Bronco, and way too many other Fords
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Discussion Starter #1
A few weeks ago I was helping a buddy with his F-250 and realized that a lot of my friends that are great mechanics have a tough time with electrical. Because of this, I will create some documentation on how to do things that often don't seem obvious. The first one I am doing is upgrading connectors. This is less of a problem in the newer trucks, but in my 78, I frequently deal with issues caused by corrosion in the connectors. Like everyone else, I clean the connectors, but eventually the problem comes back, and as Murphy would have it, at the least convenient moment. Todays example is the connector for the rear window motor.

Most of the connectors on a FSB are not waterproof. Most modern vehicles use sealed connectors. Today we are going to use Delphi weather pack connectors. Most other connectors work similarly. Weather pack connectors come in many number of conductors from 1 through 22 or so. The 22 even comes in a bulkhead version for making custom harnesses that go through the firewall. The nice thing is that they are completely sealed, so many of the old issues go away. Another nice advantage is they are about the same size and shape as the connectors Ford installed and have compatible mounting slides.

To build most connectors, you are going to need some strippers and crimpers. These are not the same as the crimpers you use on other connectors. They are much smaller and compress the power into a much smaller space creating a stronger crimp. They also should have the ability to crimp on the seals. The best ones ratchet to make certain you get things tight enough but are much more expensive. I have super strong hands, so it's not really an issue for me.
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You are also going to need the connectors themselves. You can get them online from Ebay or Amazon. I usually get mine from a company called "The Electrical Depot". You will need 5 parts. The male and female bodies to connect things with. All Weather Pack connector bodies take all Weather Pack Pins. The male and female terminals come in 3 different sizes from 20-18AWG, 16-14WG, and 12-10AWG. The largest ones can handle 20A continuous. The seals also come in the same sizes. The seals are color coded to keep things simple.

The first step is to cut out the old connector. In this example, I have also moved the mounting slide to the new connector.
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The next step is to slide the seals onto the wire with the thin end pointed to the end. After that, strip a very short amount 3/16" or so of wire from the end.
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The next step is to crimp the connectors on. When assembling this, remember the female connector will end up in the body with the seal on it. The male connector will end up in the body with the mounting slide.

When installed correctly, the crimp will happen on the metal of the wire itself, next to the insulation. I place the open part of the connector into the U of the crimper, and squeeze as hard as I can. Finally, slide the seal down so it is inside the second part of the connector, and use the seal position to crimp the seal on.
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Slide the connectors into the appropriate body (mounting slide in my case) until you hear a click, and the connector will not come out. They make in removal tools and kits if you need to take the connectors back out. Once the connectors are in, fold down the retaining door and your connector is complete.
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Repeat the same procedure on the other end, being careful that the correct wire goes in the correct place to match the end you have already done. There are letters on the bodies to make this easier. Plug everything together, and make certain to reinstall all the appropriate clips, and you're good to go.
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I hope someone finds this useful, let me know if you do.

P.S. Some mechanic someday will be really confused why my obviously original factory Ford window motor has a different connector.
 

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I’ve been poking around how I want to run some standalone harness connectors for my HP fuel pump and speed sensor for my 460 swap. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Have you tried using the crimp tool on 10 gauge wire? I need to run fuel pump supply and ground to the back of my Bronco for the EFI portion of the engine swap (going with one in-tank pump). Seems like 12 or 10 gauge is appropriate, 10 probably more so based on the run length. I've read some internet grumblings about anything larger than 12 gauge, perhaps even including 12 gauge, being difficult to crimp. Any experience there?
 

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1978 Bronco, 1996 Bronco, and way too many other Fords
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Discussion Starter #5
Have you tried using the crimp tool on 10 gauge wire? I need to run fuel pump supply and ground to the back of my Bronco for the EFI portion of the engine swap (going with one in-tank pump). Seems like 12 or 10 gauge is appropriate, 10 probably more so based on the run length. I've read some internet grumblings about anything larger than 12 gauge, perhaps even including 12 gauge, being difficult to crimp. Any experience there?
I've done 12AWG many times. I think I have done 10AWG, but I can't remember a notable example to be certain. Make sure you have the right pins, sockets and seals for that size. They come in 3 sizes if I am not mistaken.
 

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Crimping 10 and 12 gauge wire is just as difficult as 14... just need a set of good crimping pliers
Channellock 909 9.5-Inch Wire Crimping Tool | Electrician's Terminal Crimp Pliers with Cutter are Designed for Insulated and Non-Insulated Connections | Forged from High Carbon Steel | Laser Heat-Treated Edges Last Longer | Made in the USA https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004SBD...abc_DHFF6CHJ6T267JMP30C0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
 
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