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n 1996 Bronco Workshop Manual, "The advantages of a coolant recovery system are:
No loss of coolant when engine is hot.
Reduced pollution due to coolant not being released from the vehicle.
Reduced air trapped in the coolant resulting in less overheating from coolant foaming, longer water pump seal life, reduced possibility of water pump impeller damage from bubbles in coolant, longer hose life, and less cooling system corrosion."
@ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/man...j/stj33005.htm

If the tanks' cap intact and is not sealed to prevent normal coolant seepage over a period of time? I used to "seal" it with a this strip of aluminum foil, rolled lengthwise & wrapped around the cap to tank "neck". Removed foil after a local radiator shop owner saw it during a coolant flush and informed me that tank needs to "breathe." We live in a home water well area so flushing coolant is of course, banned.

"A malfunctioning radiator cap seal can allow air to enter the system, often producing bubbles in the expansion reservoir." See test @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/man...tm#extract_574

"Thermostat, Water;
Perform the following inspection at approximately 22°C (72°F).
If the problem being investigated is insufficient heat, inspect the water thermostat (8575) for leakage. Hold the water thermostat up to a lighted background. Light leakage around the water thermostat valve (water thermostat at room temperature) is unacceptable and the water thermostat should be replaced. A slight leakage of light at one or two locations on the perimeter of the valve of some water thermostats may be detected. This is considered normal." @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/man...tm#extract_574

Cylinder Leakage Detector;
When a cylinder produces a low reading, the use of Rotunda Pressurization Kit 014-00705 or equivalent will be helpful in pinpointing the exact cause.
The leakage detector is inserted in the spark plug hole, the piston is brought up to top dead center on the compression stroke, and compressed air is admitted.
Once the combustion chamber is pressurized, a special gauge will read the percentage of leakage. Leakage exceeding 20 percent is considered excessive.
While the air pressure is retained in the cylinder, listen for the hiss of escaping air. A leak by the intake valve (6507) will be audible in the throttle body (9E926). A leak by the exhaust valve (6505) can be heard at the tail pipe. Leakage past the rings will be audible at the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) connection. If air is passing through a blown gasket to an adjacent cylinder, the noise will be evident at the spark plug hole of the cylinder into which the air is leaking. Cracks in the cylinder block (6010), or gasket leakage into the cooling system may be detected by a stream of bubbles in the radiator (8005)." @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/man...j/stj30011.htm
Burping the coolant system; this is by Ford;
WARNING: DO NOT STAND IN LINE WITH OR NEAR ENGINE COOLING FAN BLADE (8600) WHEN ENGINE (6007) IS RUNNING.

WARNING: NEVER REMOVE THE RADIATOR CAP (8100) UNDER ANY CONDITIONS WHILE THE ENGINE IS OPERATING. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE INSTRUCTIONS COULD RESULT IN DAMAGE TO THE COOLING SYSTEM OR ENGINE OR PERSONAL INJURY. TO AVOID HAVING SCALDING HOT COOLANT OR STEAM BLOW OUT OF THE RADIATOR (8005), USE EXTREME CARE WHEN REMOVING THE RADIATOR CAP FROM A HOT RADIATOR. WAIT UNTIL THE ENGINE HAS COOLED, THEN WRAP A THICK CLOTH AROUND THE RADIATOR CAP AND TURN IT SLOWLY TO THE FIRST STOP. STEP BACK WHILE THE PRESSURE IS RELEASED FROM THE COOLING SYSTEM. WHEN YOU ARE SURE ALL THE PRESSURE HAS BEEN RELEASED, PRESS DOWN ON THE RADIATOR CAP (STILL WITH A CLOTH), TURN AND REMOVE IT.

1. Fill the radiator with a 50/50 mixture of the specified engine coolant concentrate and water. Allow several minutes for trapped air to escape (bubble out) and for engine coolant to flow through the radiator.
2. Replace the radiator cap to its fully installed position, then back off to the first stop. This will prevent high pressure from building up in the cooling system during this part of the fill procedure.
3. Start and idle the engine until the thermostat opens and the radiator upper hose becomes warm.
4. Shut off the engine and allow the engine to cool. Cover the radiator cap with a thick cloth and cautiously remove it. Step back while the pressure releases.
5. Finally, check the radiator and add more engine coolant if needed, following the procedures noted above. Reinstall the radiator cap securely, when finished.
6. If more engine coolant is necessary, fill the overflow reservoir to the appropriate level marked on the bottle..."
if ok;
If the heater water hoses are too hot to hold, the thermostat is OK
"Install the water thermostat in the intake manifold opening with the copper pellet or element toward the engine (6007) and the thermostat flange positioned in the recess. If the water thermostat is improperly installed, it will cause a retarded flow of coolant." @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/man...tm#extract_579

and by @kinGFISH; "... the spring side of the thermostat goes into the intake manifold. take the upper hose off and make sure its the right direction.."
¤
In 96 Bronco Owner's Guide, see Coolant beginning on page 295. Howver, no mention of air perpetrators.
¤
Also, ASE publications that I saved excerpts in my MS WORD BRONCO FILES:
"...The hose connecting the radiator and the expansion reservoir must be leak-tight at the clamp connections. The hose can not be split or leaking. Air can enter the hose and produce bubbling inside the expansion reservoir..."
"...A failed water pump seal will allow air to enter the intake or suction side of the pump. This produces bubbling when the trapped air reaches the radiator inlet neck..."
"...Blown or deteriorated head gaskets account for one of the most common and obvious causes of coolant bubbling. If the head gasket material blows between a water jacket and the inner area next to the cylinder, compression gases will enter the water jacket and send air through the head and into the cooling system. Blown head gaskets produce profuse bubbling inside the radiator and expansion reservoir. Rapid overheating results..."
"...Radiators rust with age, but particularly when they have not been flushed and supplied with the proper antifreeze-to-water ratio. Rust, sludge and debris particles will clog the radiator core tubes, and impair the operation of the thermostat and water pump impeller. Extreme heat and rust will cause the coolant to boil, producing minute bubbles, seen in the radiator neck or expansion reservoir..."
"Ford thermostats have a small weep hole that allows a very small flow during warmup so that the engine doesn't overheat before the thermostat warms. This weep hole also helps to bleed air from the system so they can reach the highest point in the cooling system."
"...Air pockets in the cooling system usually result from an improper flushing procedure or partial or incomplete radiator fill-up. Air pockets causes a lower coolant volume, often leading to higher than normal operating temperatures. Air will be seen bubbling from the radiator inlet neck or inside the expansion reservoir..."
"...A faulty thermostat that causes sporadic opening and closing can cause a churning and bubbling effect seen in the radiator or expansion reservoir..."
"If the system can’t hold pressure, coolant will boil in the cylinder head and next to the cylinder walls, forming vapor bubbles, and the engine will quickly overheat. Realistically, no further diagnosis can be done until the system is repaired to the point where it can hold pressure. If the pressure tester hand pump must be pumped for an excessive amount of time before the system is pressurized, this often indicates the presence of trapped air in the system. A block test should immediately follow a pressure test, since the estimate for the repair may skyrocket if a failed head gasket or cracked head is indicated..." by https://www.motor.com/magazine-summa...tem-diagnosis/

Sources;
96 Bronco Technical Service Bulletins, but none are relevant. @ http://www.bbbind.com/tsb-wiring-diagrams-database/
Includes some Ford EVTM Wiring Diagrams.

96 Workshop Manual, Partial l @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/stjleft.htm

96 Bronco Owner's Guide, Maintenance Schedules & Parts and Accessories by Ford @ https://www.fleet.ford.com/partsands...owner-manuals/

My archived website @ http://schwimserver5.com/?index=1128
 
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