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Discussion Starter #1
this was originally posted under "emergency help" but i think i've resigned myself that to the fact that since i will be tearing down the engine again that perhaps "emergency" isn't quite the most appropriate term to use.
original thread

after removing the heads this is what i found


so obviously i have to cut out some "slightly" larger holes in the gaskets to allow for some actual fluid flow. but here's my question: these gaskets and heads obviously have some universality to them - i.e. gaskets can go on either banks as well as the heads so their not exactly "keyed" to a specific bank. so when i start making these passages bigger is it just a matter of seeing which holes int he block line up with which holes in the head and open up the corresponding hole in the gasket?

if it helps the gaskets are fel-pro 1006 locwire and the heads are 185cc air flow research heads....


thanks again
 

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What are you planning on makeing the holes bigger with? Chances are you will destroy the head gasket. I dont see how coolant passages in the head gasket can cause coolant in the oil, that would only cause an overheating problem (unlikely that it would even cause that) Did you build the motor yourself? Did you have the block checked?




I would look more into the block and maybe a bad seal on the intake.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
oh okay...thanks for the advice on not making the holes larger....was planning on using an exacto knofe....things just seems too damn small to let anything pass and might get clogged up faster....i dunno how or with what they'ed get clogged...they just seem small

i bought the short block from a builder...been building it up from there myself....and yes this is my first build...

as i was doing the teardown i didn't notice anything with the lower intake seals but then again i'm the bafoon who put them together

suppose i'll reassemble the motor and manually pump the fluids through and see what happens

any other suggestions on things to check, test or otherwise?
 

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But what does mine say?
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You can test the pressure on your coolant system. I really still think that that's were your problem was (intake). I only say that because it happened to me once. Now that you have it apart though, just take your time and make sure you follow torque specs. When you have to torque in steps, torque to the first step, and then walk away for 15 min to a half hour. Then come back and torque to the second set of specs. Be sure to follow the correct pattern too. This will allow the metal to settle evenly. Just take your time and all will go well. Second, make sure that those are brand new head bolts that you are using. You'd be surprised what the differences are between brand new bolts and old bolts that have seen very hot and cold situations. Third, buy a new set of gaskets. Don't try to reuse those head gaskets. Not sayin that you were goin to, that's just the way it sounds, so I wanted to say that. Clean everything thouroughly. (Not that I should have to say that.) Also, don't use too much RTV/permatex or whatever. On the bolts that protrude into your cooling, add a small amount of RTV to their threads as well. Not too much though, because it will screw up the torque specs.

I almost forgot..... Take a strait edge to the block and cylinder heads and make sure that they haven't been warped. It's very important. You don't even have to have bad head gaskets, but warped heads/block will cause all kinds of problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks alot folks...some helpful stuff here.

so i've decided that i've walked away from the bronco long enough and to come back to it.

the block looks straight. could use a new straight flywheel/flexplate (always seems to get into arguments about which is manual and which auto). the heads are straight and the gaskets good. i've left the gaskets alone and didn't open up any of the passages (yes this is the first engine i've ever built).

so now my question is regarding cam timing. the motor will be sc'd but i wanna run it naturally aspirated just to break it in.
the geometry of rockers and valves are stock. i don't have the exact specs of the cam but it's not a wild cam or anything...comp cams ground one for me for the application...a bit on the torquey side as opposed to high end.

i understand that timing is one of those trial and error deals for each individual application but is there a a general range that the 5.8's tend to be happier in?

thanks again
 

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If it were me, I would set timing to stock specs first, and then adjust it a lil at a time over a period of a day or two, until you feel that you have found the best setting. Watch out for things like drastic temp changes and knocking, which would mean it's set to high/advanced. If it seems to be missing (not loping from the cam), then it needs to be advanced a lil more. Unless you have a dyno to tune it on, that's the best advice I can give you. Maybe someone else can chime in with a different view.
 
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