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Discussion Starter #1
I know that there are a few other diabetics on here and was just wondering if anyone knows of or uses diabetic apps for their iPhone.
I don't have an iPhone yet, but plan on getting one and was just wondering if there are any suggestions for apps. My sugars have been a little out of whack and need to buckle down and was looking for something to help out (with carb counting and such).
Thanks for any input.
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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iPhone brings teh ghey. Don't be another drone. Be a 'droid. :rofl: ;)

j/k Everyone has their own preference in phones; I'm just loving mine and doin' a little Apple hatin'. I have an HTC Incredible, a Google Android phone, and I'm using a free application called Insulin Calc, made by CityJams. I haven't any idea about their name, but that's what is listed.

So far, it's been dead-on accurate and very helpful over the past week, with dosage resolution in the tenths of a unit (!). I use the Humalog KwikPen and Lantus, about 3 units of the Humalog per Carb (15g == 1 Carb). All you have to do to use the program is enter current and target blood glucose levels, carbohydrate intake (in grams), ratio of Carbs to insulin units, your level of physical activity (none, low, medium, and high), and "number of points your blood glucose will be reduced per insulin unit" which is highly individualized (mine is set to 40). It will then tell you how many units of insulin you need.

As far as actually counting carbs, it's more of an acquired art skill than a science, in my experience. Observing the above rule of 15:1 works great for me and most other diabetics, although insulin sensitivity and lifestyle can demand a higher resolution and subsequent adjustments. Reading the labels and using measuring devices helps one to get a grip on the ropes, and avoiding items with high fructose corn syrup like the plague also helps. No two meals are the same; your own metabolic rate and even your mood can drastically change blood glucose levels, and other seemingly unrelated illnesses and conditions can wreak havoc on a diabetic's system, e.g. thyroid conditions, depression, anxiety, drug use (legal and otherwise), body chemistry, sleep patterns, daily routine schedule (or lack thereof in my case lol), and so on. The body is a system, with each of its parts exhibiting different roles, interconnected in ways that are fascinating and frustrating at once. If nothing else, this condition really makes you learn to "listen" to your body and what it needs.

Learning to control diabetes takes time, patience, and perseverance, but also a willingness to try new things, and openness to changing habits. Always seek more information about our disease and its treatments; this is one clear-cut case where, truly, knowledge is power. The treatment and information available today is SO much greater than it was two or three decades ago, thanks mostly to electronics and pharmaceutical developments. However, YOU are ultimately in control. Your endocrinologist can breathe fire at you, and be pissed to the point to make shoot blood out of his eyes -- been there! :D -- but it's always up to you and your actions.

I hope I didn't come across as condescending; rather the opposite, I hope this motivates you to keep at it, and don't ever give up. I've lost too many friends to this damned disease already, but I'm living proof that it's definitely treatable in the long term -- no retinopathy, kidney damage, or neuropathy -- and it's not a disability in my mind at all.

The importance of control resonates more-succinctly for me when I read things like this Wiki paragraph:

Diabetic retinopathy is retinopathy (damage to the retina) caused by complications of diabetes mellitus, which can eventually lead to blindness. It is an ocular manifestation of systemic disease which affects up to 80% of all patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more.[1] Despite these intimidating statistics, research indicates that at least 90% of these new cases could be reduced if there was proper and vigilant treatment and monitoring of the eyes.[2]
Just out of curiosity, how is your activity level? Are you sticking to a diet of mostly natural & organic foods?


EDIT: I found the following tidbit and it really pissed me off:

After 20 years of diabetes, nearly all patients with type 1 diabetes and >60% of patients with type 2 diabetes have some degree of retinopathy.[6]
I can't yell BULLSHIT! any louder than I did when I read it. Knock on wood, but this is total crap IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nope, not condescending at all. Value the input.
Like I said, my sugars have been no where near where they should be and recently was sick and had to spend the night in ICU to get the sugars down (only reason for ICU is that they can administer the insulin via IV). So gone back to school (diabetic clinic) for a refresher on carb counting and also looking at different ways to help as well..
Thanks for your input, will definitely take a look
 

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Satyr of the Midwest
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