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MidlifeCrisisUndrWay
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can I adjust the camber myself by removing the top nut and turn the camber adjustment nut until I get the camber I want?
Or is there more involved?

Here's my upper ball joint/adjustable camber nut:
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Premium Member
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Yes, but that shim will also change caster when you change camber.
With enough cross caster, you might get a pull one way or the other.

Ideally, I would have it put on an alignment rack and at least see
where you are, give you some kind of starting point.
 
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Yo CDA,
Caster and Camber, Bronco and F-150, F-250 4x4 Vehicles

SPECIAL SERVICE TOOL(S) REQUIRED
Description​
Tool Number​
Pitman Arm Puller​
T64P-3590-F​

Caster and camber adjustment is provided by means of a series of interchangeable mounting sleeves (camber adjusters) for the upper ball joint stud. There is one adjuster available for caster.

  1. Measure camber with available alignment equipment. If camber is out of specification, proceed to Step 2.
  1. Raise vehicle on hoist and remove the front wheels.
  1. Remove the upper ball joint cotter pin and nut.
  1. Loosen the lower ball joint nut to the end of the stud.
  1. Strike the inside of the spindle near the upper and lower ball joints to break the spindle loose from the ball joint studs.
  1. Remove the camber adjuster sleeve. If required, use Pitman Arm Puller T64P-3590-F to remove the adjuster from the spindle.
  1. Install the replacement service adjuster.
    • To increase camber (more positive) point the arrow on the adjuster outboard.
    • To decrease camber (more negative) point the arrow on the adjuster inboard.
  1. NOTE: Excessive spindle turning efforts, causing poor steering returnability, may result if the fastener tightening sequence described in the following steps is not followed exactly.


    Remove the lower ball stud nut and apply Loctite® 242 or equivalent to the lower stud.
  1. Hand-start the lower nut and partially tighten to 54 Nm (40 lb-ft).
  1. Install the new upper nut and tighten to 115-135 Nm (85-100 lb-ft). Advance the nut to the next castellation and install a new cotter pin.
  1. Finish tightening the lower nut to 128-149 Nm (95-110 lb-ft).
  1. Install the wheel and lower the vehicle.
  1. Check camber and set toe according to alignment procedure.
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    ItemPart NumberDescription
    1Slots in Sleeve Engage Lugs to Prevent Rotation of Sleeve Which Would Result in Change of Caster Angle
    2Split in Sleeve Allows Sleeve to Expand When Ball Stud Nut Is Tightened, Locking Sleeve and Ball Stud in Location
    3Ball Stud (Part of 3049)
    4Ball Stud Axis
    5Support Collar with Integral Indexing Lugs Welded to Axle Arm Stamping
    6Step in Sleeve for Engagement of 2-Jaw Puller When Necessary for Removal
    7Axle Stamping (Part of 3002)
    8Angle at Which Sleeve Holds Ball Studs Determines Camber/Caster
    9Sleeve and Support Collar Axis (Also the Ball Stud Axis When 0° Camber Sleeve Is Installed)
 

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1996 EB w/5.8 TOO much lift, 44" Mudders & 5:43-5:38's
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If you know what brand adjustable ball joint you have, you can utilize their chart to see what setting you are at now by the markings on it.
For example, here is the MOOG chart I used for mine:



For example, at this setting (A G) the Caster is at 0° but the camber is -3 1/4°
If I wanted more Positive Caster without affecting my Camber, I would move it to (A GH) which would give me -3°

 

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1995 Ford Bronco XLT 5.8l
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If you know what brand adjustable ball joint you have, you can utilize their chart to see what setting you are at now by the markings on it.
For example, here is the MOOG chart I used for mine:



For example, at this setting (A G) the Caster is at 0° but the camber is -3 1/4°
If I wanted more Positive Caster without affecting my Camber, I would move it to (A GH) which would give me -3°

Not to derail thread but can I ask why you chose to run 0° caster? I had an alignment shop do mine a while back and after it had pretty noticeable positive camber. I was told it was this way because I had just put new springs so that they would settle after a while. They never did so I’m thinking about redoing it myself.
 

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1996 EB w/5.8 TOO much lift, 44" Mudders & 5:43-5:38's
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I didn't, it was just for illustration; basically showing that you are able to change camber to a certain extent, without affecting caster.
 
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