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Well i need a set of door lock for my 88, i found on broncograveyard.com that they sell the set with keys for 80-86 and 92-96 broncos for like $25, but i can not find them for 87-91, does anyone know where i can get these or if a lock smith can just make a key for the ones i have?
 

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Lick my balls
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I thought they were all the same. You can also look at F150s and probably the f250s as well.
 

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*******EDIT******** Check post #8 below

'80-86 use a reversed door key (round head) that matches the t/g & the glove box. The square-head key ONLY fits the ignition, but they're all 6-cut keys.

'87-91 use the square head in the doors, and they're 10-cut keys. They still use the round head for the t/g & glove box.

'92-96 keys are just like '87-91, but there's no lock on the glove box. The only differences are 1) the levers on the door lock cylinders are plastic, but they're the same size & shape, so they're interchangeable with the older ones, & 2) the ignition lock cylinder is totally different for the newer steering column.

So if you're buying an ignition lock cylinder & key, you can "downgrade" to the older 6-cut. If you're buying door locks & keys, you can use the newer ones with plastic levers. Either way, your door key won't match your ignition key any more.

But if you shop your local parts stores, they can probably get you the correct matched set.
 

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Steve83 said:
'80-86 use a reversed door key (round head) that matches the t/g & the glove box. The square-head key ONLY fits the ignition, but they're all 6-cut keys.

'87-91 use the square head in the doors, and they're 10-cut keys. They still use the round head for the t/g & glove box.
:scratchhe My 89 is the same as your description of the 80-86, but I don't know what 6 and 10 cut means so I don't know about that part.
 

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If you have your lock cylinders in the truck, then you can just have a locksmith recut you a key. If you take it to the locksmith, it will probably cost around 40 bucks or so. Good luck
 

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Steve83 said:
'80-86 use a reversed door key (round head) that matches the t/g & the glove box. The square-head key ONLY fits the ignition, but they're all 6-cut keys.

'87-91 use the square head in the doors, and they're 10-cut keys. They still use the round head for the t/g & glove box.

'92-96 keys are just like '87-91, but there's no lock on the glove box. The only differences are 1) the levers on the door lock cylinders are plastic, but they're the same size & shape, so they're interchangeable with the older ones, & 2) the ignition lock cylinder is totally different for the newer steering column.

So if you're buying an ignition lock cylinder & key, you can "downgrade" to the older 6-cut. If you're buying door locks & keys, you can use the newer ones with plastic levers. Either way, your door key won't match your ignition key any more.

But if you shop your local parts stores, they can probably get you the correct matched set.
Nope, that is mostly wrong...

82-91 use the round key for the doors and tailgate and the square for the ignition
92-96 use the long square key for the ignition and doors and the round key for tailgate and glove box/console

82-91 IS NOT interchangable with 92-96

His door key never matched his ignition. 92-96 if you replace your ignition any locksmith can match it to your existing key.

If you go to a locksmith usually the cheapest way is to take out the passenger side door lock and bring that to a shop. We only charge 17.50 to make a key for a door lock if you take it out. Otherwise a locksmith can impression a key with the lock still in the door (we charge $25 for that)

BTW Ford never made a "6" cut...

Trust me I am a locksmith and that has been the family business for 25+ yrs now.
 

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I'd have sworn the doors went square before '92... :shrug Oh well.

But you're wrong on one SMALL point: no consoles have locks. ;)
Bronco Chick said:
92-96 use ...the round key for ...console
console
Sorry: '80-86 is 5-cut. :brownbag
 

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Steve83 said:
I'd have sworn the doors went square before '92... :shrug Oh well.

But you're wrong on one SMALL point: no consoles have locks. ;)

Sorry: '80-86 is 5-cut. :brownbag
Wrong again, damn I sure do get tired of correcting you:goodfinge yes the center consoles did come with factory locks...in fact I have one in my bronco.
 

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I've got an '88, and don't have keys for the doors, and the ignition has the "keyless" feature as well(turns without a key). So I can have a key made using the door lock for the doors only? The ignition would use a different key right? Just want to make sure, as I'll probably get some door keys made this weekend. Thanks!
 

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My '90 has a factory locking console,in fact i just replaced the latch because it broke internaly(spent an hour to get the lid open without damaging any thing).I transfered the lock cylinder from the old one to the new one.
 

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Blue'87GT said:
I've got an '88, and don't have keys for the doors, and the ignition has the "keyless" feature as well(turns without a key). So I can have a key made using the door lock for the doors only? The ignition would use a different key right? Just want to make sure, as I'll probably get some door keys made this weekend. Thanks!

Either take the door lock out (passenger side, less worn out) or a locksmith can impression the door lock with it still in the vehicle. The lock is pretty easy to get out though...most times there is a black clip on the side of the door, pull on that and the door lock will come out the front of the door. CAREFULL! Put a pair of vise grips on the linkage (the metal rod attatched to the back of the lock) so that it doesn't fall back into the door.

As for your ignition...they are pretty cheap to replace if you ever want to have a key for it. The ignition is broken, don't bother trying to repair it...they aren't worth it and they'll just break again, just replace it.

Kelley:thumbup
 

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Easiest cheapest way to get a door key is pull the console and take it to the locksmith. Absent that (missing or non-functioning console) pull a door lock.

From '82 up to and including 91, Broncos had 1 key (square-ish) and 1 key (oval-ish)for the rest doors/tailgate/glove/console. Before that 78-81, the ign/key and door were the same.
The Ford "10" didnt start until 92 until 96. Broncos were always very unusual, lagging behind key/lock design changes compared to other models. As an example, the early Bronco was one of the last of the Ford fleet to get double sided keys that started on most models in 1968. Similarly, the Ford "10" was introduced in 1984 1/2 and Broncos didnt get them until 1992. Just a little Bronco trivia if you care.

If you want your door keys the same as your ignition, there is an "optional" lock that can be pinned to your exisiting ignition. A good locksmith should be able to order them.
 

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j. r. Nice said:
Easiest cheapest way to get a door key is pull the console and take it to the locksmith. Absent that (missing or non-functioning console) pull a door lock.
NO!:twak

The center console lock (and glove box) do not have enough cuts in them to make a door key.

The only ways to get door keys are the options I explained before, unless you feel the need to pull the tailgate lock, that will also get you a door key.
 

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Bronco Chick said:
NO!:twak

The center console lock (and glove box) do not have enough cuts in them to make a door key.

The only ways to get door keys are the options I explained before, unless you feel the need to pull the tailgate lock, that will also get you a door key.

Actually you are right but you are wrong.

Right 1) console and glove only have the last 4 cuts

Right 2) the only way to guarantee a key will work a lock is to cut a key for THAT lock. That's a universal truth, not debating that.

Wrong 1) you can cut a door key by code (I know - most owners dont have that, but most owners dont know what they are looking for either.)

Wrong 2) There are enough cuts (wafers) to make a door key. Take the 4 knows and progress first cut. There are only 5 depths and if you are frugal about wasting blanks you can cut each combination on one side - total of 3 blanks used. The customer could try each side and mark the postion of the one that works. Then you can cut that one.

Even better, and if you are really frugal about blanks, after you decode the console lock, check the Ford "FA/FB" codes and see which of the possiblities were not used......takes about 2 minutes. That will probably limit the possibilties even further.

If it were me, and a customer came in to my shop and handed me a console lock, I would not turn him away. I would explain the options/outcome.

If a customer called and had the above problem I would give them the option of pulling the console vs the door. The console is a lot easier to pull and decode than the door. The clip can be problematic for someone who has never messed with one and they dont always go back the way they were. I would give them the option, explaining the possible outcome(s)

If a customer drove in with the Bronco, I would probably risk it and pull the console. Failing that I would impression the door in place.

If I were called out and the car were locked and keys missing I would impression. I'm pretty fast at impressioning but (assuming someone hasn't bastardized the lock system) the console method is faster.

If you recall, the old GM glove box locks were used to make a door key. The did that for several reasons. And with the Glenn Speedup Manual, it pretty much did the same thing as I described for the Ford.

Matter of fact, I dont think I would have a customer pull a lock. Chances are, if they want a door key it probably drives. Why not just have them drive it in. I would think it would be better customer appeal.....unless they had a reason not to. Whatever the technique owners shouldnt expect it to cost $10.

Just my .02
 

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Bronco Chick said:
Nope, that is mostly wrong...

80-91 use the round key for the doors and tailgate and the square for the ignition



Additionally, I believe the square key was used 78-81 (inclusive). Ford didnt switch over to the Ignition only system until 82....with some minor exceptions.
 

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j. r. Nice said:
Actually you are right but you are wrong.

Right 1) console and glove only have the last 4 cuts

Right 2) the only way to guarantee a key will work a lock is to cut a key for THAT lock. That's a universal truth, not debating that.

Wrong 1) you can cut a door key by code (I know - most owners dont have that, but most owners dont know what they are looking for either.)

Wrong 2) There are enough cuts (wafers) to make a door key. Take the 4 knows and progress first cut. There are only 5 depths and if you are frugal about wasting blanks you can cut each combination on one side - total of 3 blanks used. The customer could try each side and mark the postion of the one that works. Then you can cut that one.

Even better, and if you are really frugal about blanks, after you decode the console lock, check the Ford "FA/FB" codes and see which of the possiblities were not used......takes about 2 minutes. That will probably limit the possibilties even further.

If it were me, and a customer came in to my shop and handed me a console lock, I would not turn him away. I would explain the options/outcome.

If a customer called and had the above problem I would give them the option of pulling the console vs the door. The console is a lot easier to pull and decode than the door. The clip can be problematic for someone who has never messed with one and they dont always go back the way they were. I would give them the option, explaining the possible outcome(s)

If a customer drove in with the Bronco, I would probably risk it and pull the console. Failing that I would impression the door in place.

If I were called out and the car were locked and keys missing I would impression. I'm pretty fast at impressioning but (assuming someone hasn't bastardized the lock system) the console method is faster.

If you recall, the old GM glove box locks were used to make a door key. The did that for several reasons. And with the Glenn Speedup Manual, it pretty much did the same thing as I described for the Ford.

Matter of fact, I dont think I would have a customer pull a lock. Chances are, if they want a door key it probably drives. Why not just have them drive it in. I would think it would be better customer appeal.....unless they had a reason not to. Whatever the technique owners shouldnt expect it to cost $10.

Just my .02

Wrong 1 - There are no codes anywhere on that year ford so trying to explain that is a waste

Wrong 2 - Thats alot of wasted time driving back and forth (time = money) doing it that way. It's not rocket science to pull a door lock.

"If you recall, the old GM glove box locks were used to make a door key. The did that for several reasons. And with the Glenn Speedup Manual, it pretty much did the same thing as I described for the Ford."

The reasoning for that is because it is a pita to pull gm door locks. Much easier to make a key for the glove box/console and progress the rest.

Ford isn't such an issue to pull the lock (clip on the side of the door)

"Even better, and if you are really frugal about blanks, after you decode the console lock, check the Ford "FA/FB" codes and see which of the possiblities were not used......takes about 2 minutes. That will probably limit the possibilties even further."

And guess what that will give you...possible depths 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 (waste)

If a customer called and had the above problem I would give them the option of pulling the console vs the door. The console is a lot easier to pull and decode than the door. The clip can be problematic for someone who has never messed with one and they dont always go back the way they were. I would give them the option, explaining the possible outcome(s)

You can also read a person and decide if they have the means and brains to do this. It's not that hard

BTW I wouldn't turn them away either. But people on the whole are dumb, they usually don't understand progessing a key. Telling them to pull a door lock is much easier for them to comprehend. Plus it's one trip, getting it done right the first time and be done with it

Pulling a door lock also gives a much more accurate key as opposed to impressioning.

I don't know what your shop is like but mine is very busy most of the time and it's alot easier if the customer just pulls the lock

Kelley:thumbup
 

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j. r. Nice said:
Bronco Chick said:
Nope, that is mostly wrong...

82-91 use the round key for the doors and tailgate and the square for the ignition



Additionally, I believe the square key was used 78-81 (inclusive). Ford didnt switch over to the Ignition only system until 82....with some minor exceptions.
Your right...just a typo

Fixed.
 
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