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My 1983 is giving me a hard time with electrical things. My latest is the high beams keep blowing out. I put in new headlights, and as soon as i hit the high beams, the high beam bulbs blow. The low beams are working fine still. I couldn't find any blown fuses either. What is going on??
 

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My 1983 is giving me a hard time with electrical things. My latest is the high beams keep blowing out. I put in new headlights, and as soon as i hit the high beams, the high beam bulbs blow. The low beams are working fine still. I couldn't find any blown fuses either. What is going on??

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How long do the high beams work before blowing out?

Is there voltage to the light sockets after they blow?

I suspect you have a short in your dimmer.
 

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A short won't blow a bulb - it'll blow a fuse, circuit breaker, or fusible link wire.

Are the bulbs exploding, burning out, or just shutting off? Are they standard H6054 bulbs?
 

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my bko ate my money
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are you touching the bulb with your bare skin? i was told the oil in your skin can cause them to blow, if not sounds like too much power or something, has anything been rewired or messed with involing the headlights?
 

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are you touching the bulb with your bare skin? i was told the oil in your skin can cause them to blow, if not sounds like too much power or something, has anything been rewired or messed with involing the headlights?
An 83 shouldn't have the small halogen bulb that you don't want to touch.

Do they blow with the engine running?

Do you have dual batteries or some sort of radio filter?
 

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Are they standard H6054 bulbs?
:popc1:
...sounds like too much power or something, has anything been rewired or messed with involing the headlights?
It shouldn't matter how anything is rewired. Even if the lows stay on, the highs shouldn't burn out instantly, and I'd expect the bulbs to crack or BOTH filaments to burn out. No other wiring mod (except converting to 24V) would cause them to burn out prematurely.
 

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my bko ate my money
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ok sorry guys, brain fart, 83=non halogens, ive got no other answers to your perticular problem, steve looks like he`s waiting for an answer to his question though
 

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Only 3 things I can think of that would blow your bulbs out...1) wrong bulb, 2)improper voltage, 3)improper current draw through circuit...(could lead to a short from a chaffed wire or loose connection or the addition of something to the circuit like an accessory or something that was added in series)..check your wiring all the way back to the power source..if its all good..including the switches, then its the source....this is of course assuming that the light fixture itself is good.....
 

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my bko ate my money
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Yes, all FSB headlights are halogen. But '78-86 are sealed-beam.
wow i thought they were just sealed beam, didnt know they were also halogens, learn something new everyday:toothless
 

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3)improper current draw through circuit...(could lead to a short from a chaffed wire or loose connection or the addition of something to the circuit like an accessory or something that was added in series).
Adding a load or short in series will NOT increase current thru the bulbs. At worst, it will DEcrease.
 

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Adding a load or short in series will NOT increase current thru the bulbs. At worst, it will DEcrease.
X2.
The only ways I can think of to blow the bulbs are:
a) wrong bulbs (or faulty bulbs, but seems unlikely given how many you've tried)
b) bulbs pulling too much current. If you have the right bulbs, the only way this can happen is if your source voltage is too high. A short or additional load in the circuit may cause a fuse to blow or the current to DECREASE, but will NOT cause the bulbs to draw more current (and subsequently blowup).
So, first check that you have the right bulbs. If you're sure you have the right bulbs in there, connect a voltmeter to the bulb socket and turn on your lights with the engine running and see what kind of voltage you are getting at the socket (and then let us know).
 

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You could hook the bulb directly to the battery and it wouldn't blow, and if it was an alternator was the problem than both the high and low beams would blow along with most lights in the vehicle.

1. Test the sockets. What is the voltage for the low beams, Voltage for the high beams, are the low beams still receiving current when the high beams are operational? Test the voltage using the socket for the negative contact and also the battery to see if there is a difference in voltage.
 
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