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Discussion Starter #1
Pull my engine last night. She leaks everywhere.
Cleaning her up today and hope get her back in tomorrow.
All new gaskets and seals, rear main repair sleeve, timing set, oil pump, and freeze plugs.
Going back with gt40 heads, explorer intake and a HO roller cam.
She's oily and nasty. Lot's to clean up.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I rebuilt the transfer case last year. No leaks so far. Transmission has a little seep around the shift shaft.
After taking her out I found the motor mounts are bad, couldn't get them today.
 

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Eric
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If you're tearing it down that far, you're just a couple steps away from a bottle brush hone, re-ring, and new rod/main bearings. I don't know how many miles are on the motor now, but freshening up the bottom end could buy you another ~100k. I mean, if you're going to pull the heads and have the oil pan off anyways...

Just my $0.02.
 

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Is the "
REAR MAIN SEAL REPAIR KIT
" something better than just replacing the rear main seal by itself?
 

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Yo Eddie,
Flomaster wrote, "There are typically two reasons why the rear seal will leak. In all cases the seal wears out. In some cases, in addition to the seal wearing out, the seal will rub a small groove into the crankshaft mating surface. Replacing a seal on a crankshaft with a groove worn into it will likely result in the new seal not being able to do its job.

With that said, there are two types of seals that you can get for that engine.

One of them is a stock seal. It is made of silicone rubber, and can be identified by the fact that it has an internal spring that keeps the sealing surface in contact with the crankshaft. If there is NO groove in the crankshaft, this seal will be adequate to stop the leak.

The other type of seal is made of PTFE (Teflon). You can identify the seal by the fact that it does not have an internal spring in it. This seal fits much tighter against the crankshaft, and might solve your leaking problem even if you DO have a groove worn into the crankshaft.

Installing the sleeve on the end of the crankshaft will solve the "groove" problem in all cases. Should you decide to sleeve the end of the crankshaft, DO NOT use the PTFE seal. It will likely bind against the crankshaft and leak worse. In this case you want to install the stock-type silicone seal.

Many people, including myself, have installed the stock-type silicone seal on a crankshaft that is slightly worn. This will almost always result in a small leak even after the seal is replaced. This experience leads to generalized statements that "the 5.8 always leaks from the rear seal". This does not have to be the case if the seal replacement is done correctly.

Use your best judgement and the facts above to stop the leak."

Goladdgrs wrote, "The problem is more than likely the mating surface. Use a sleeve to restore proper RA finish and sealing surface for the rear main seal. Victor Reinz makes a nice Teflon(PTFE) piece that is number JV1636. Felpro also makes a Teflon piece which is BS40645. Fel Pro performance also offers a PTFE seal which is number 2921. BS40645 and 2921 are IDENTICAL ,the difference is the packaging and marketing of the piece. Victor Reinz PTFE seals usually are reboxed Felpro."

@BikerPepe` can offer more info!
 

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I don’t have firsthand experience with Teflon oil seals, but I’ve seen plenty of Teflon in mechanical seals in pumps where I work, and Teflon is a steel-fretting machine. I will concede these applications are typically 3600 RPM, 24/7 operation, often similar (or larger) diameters (higher linear foot/second speed), but it will eat some steel up. Teflon is great for chemical resistance but in my opinion is several steps behind elastomers as shaft seals. I’d opt for a sleeved elastomer version well ahead of any Teflon variety if your crank requires repair. My opinion, YMMV.
 

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Premium 4 Lyfe - Way Back Staff
'95 XLT: 5.8, MAF, E4OD, 4.56's, 6" lift on 33's
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Actually, @cobrajoe gave me the good info that convinced me to install the sleeve/seal combo instead of just replacing the seal.

Sleeve I used...


New sleeve and seal installed...


Long thread with lots of great advice when I pulled my 351 to "re-seal": '95 engine pull?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did the sleeve today. Also a full inspection after I got all the gunk off it. I'm amazed that this has 200k on it. It had 69k when I bought it in 02'. This motor has never been out before. In the past I had only done the water pump (twice) and the intake. I didn't take pictures but man this engine is in great condition. Main bearings have just a hint of copper showing. Rod bearings aren't as good but still good shape. I expected the cam to have some pitting or scoring, but no.
As a pro technician I have seen a lot of low mileage engines that were ate up. This shows just what good maintenance can do. I started putting it together before I called it quits tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Works been keeping me busy.
But it's done except for chasing exhaust leaks. Going to hook the smoke machine up to it today and see where my leaks are. Sounds like the collectors.
It doesn't mate to the pipe very well. Soon I will be getting a bassani y pipe, no cats.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well she's all back together and roadworthy. Sounds great except for the exhaust leak. She won't idle lower than a thousand RPM. I'm thinking the map sensor which is 32 years old is not liking the lope from that Mustang cam. Haven't had a chance to scope it yet. It has run enough that should have learned. I have not run key on engine running test yet. as for key on engine off the only codes or the open-circuit codes for the thermocator solenoids and EGR pressure sensor since those are all disconnected.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well no joy. I can't get her to idle lower than 1000 rpm.
Self test results in code 12 25 42. I have ran the pinpoint tests on those. She is running very rich, which explains the 42 but why is she rich? Vacuum at 1000 is 15. That's too low.
Before the mods she pulled 19 at 750 rpm. She sounds sick.
Tomorrow I'll tackle the rich condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well I disconnected the exhaust and she runs a little bit better. Just wanted to see if maybe I had a restriction. The bottom line is she's pulling a steady 14 in of vacuum idling at 900 RPM. With a severe lope. Sounds like a hot rod. so I'm beginning to believe that the camshaft that I traded for was not a stock cam from a 1990 Mustang. We all know that a stock camshaft will run good with a speed density system. And these hot camshafts will cause horrible idle and running problems because of the low vacuum they pull.
 

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Eric
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Probably already addressed, but does all your ignition check out? Timing, plugs, wires, etc.? All vacuum lines intact and connected correctly? I know these are obvious things to an experienced person, but mistakes can happen...
 
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