Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am going to be replacing me entire exhaust system in a couple of weeks and have started ordering the parts.

I already have Y pipe and catalytic converter, but I am scared to start the project because I am not sure what to do with the little tube that comes out of the side of the catalytic converter. I believe that tubes runs back up to the smog pump.

my concern, I have felt my stock tube and it is metal, is this a piece that I can order as well or is there a way that you can splice into the metal line ?

whats the trick for this line? order a new one, or is there some kind of hi-temp vacuum line or something like that that you can run in its place?

this is the first exhaust project if you cant tell.

thanks for any help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
for my smog pump line i just drilled a hole in my new exhaust in the spot where it would line up and then just welded it in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
for my smog pump line i just drilled a hole in my new exhaust in the spot where it would line up and then just welded it in.
shoot! I was hoping to avoid any welding and just use those stainless band clamps from the tailpipe thread. I dont have a welder.

also, how did you even get up there to weld, the stock location of where that tube enters the cat is very hard to even see, let alone weld.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,724 Posts
From what I've read, hi temp vacuum line is fine. Head over to vatozone and pick up a couple of feet.
I'm doing mine at the end of the week when I get by Bassani Y-pipe in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
From what I've read, hi temp vacuum line is fine. Head over to vatozone and pick up a couple of feet.
I'm doing mine at the end of the week when I get by Bassani Y-pipe in.
are you going to run the vacuum line all the way to the smog pump or just splice into the existing steel tube somehow ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,724 Posts
Existing steel tube with a couple of band clamps -there's some talk about it in one of the exhaust threads. General consensus is that as long as you don't use the blue silicone line that Bassani gives you, you'll be fine. The line from Bassani ends up failing within a few weeks and blows hot air all over the tranny.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,300 Posts
yo
phobos is right on da mark!

Air Inlet Tube See #4 9J454 Air Inlet Tube

-
PCI Inc sells them direct or thru NAPA, etc.
http://www.pciinc.com/index.php/ford/converter/egr/tubes/?print=1

Ford Air Tube
Replaces O.E. E6TZ-5F235-B
Use with #7 clamp.
Use with #39 valve
$28.14

Check that pn.. I did this recently for someone in another Forum... he has a 95 5.8
-----------------------------

Overview & Diagram; "...Secondary Air Injection system consists of a belt-driven Air Pump, single or dual AIR Diverter (AIRD) valve(s), an AIR Bypass (AIRB) valve, and AIR Bypass solenoids, air silencer/filter, Powertrain Control Module and connecting wires and vacuum hoses. The Belt-Driven Secondary Air Injection system provides either upstream/bypass air or upstream/downstream/bypass air. The number of these system configurations vary significantly with AIR Bypass (AIRB) and AIR Diverter (AIRD) valve combinations (Figure 179). 2. The PCM provides one or more signals that enable one or more AIR Bypass solenoids. 3. The AIR Bypass solenoids control one or more AIR Bypass valves and/or AIR Bypass Diverter Valves in order to route secondary air depending upon the specific configuration. 4. The belt-driven Air Pump is operational any time the engine is running..." read more
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net



It provides air to CC from smog (air) pump via all that stuff and AIR Bypass valve / AIR Bypass Diverter Valve
System Diagram, late model
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
just had my exhaust done last week, exhaust guy just left my tube hanging......... he told me don't worry about......which I'm really not, but don't like the idea of it just hanging there, my new high flow cat does have the connection for the air tube, he did me a nice job for a decent price so want complain too much, should I worry bout it
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
shoot! I was hoping to avoid any welding and just use those stainless band clamps from the tailpipe thread. I dont have a welder.

also, how did you even get up there to weld, the stock location of where that tube enters the cat is very hard to even see, let alone weld.
Welding it was no joke. I think I got it welded all the way around but i know for a fact it is some awful welding up there. If you do weld it up pull the tube down to weld it on so you get a better angle on it (wish i had thought of that sooner)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
just had my exhaust done last week, exhaust guy just left my tube hanging......... he told me don't worry about......which I'm really not, but don't like the idea of it just hanging there, my new high flow cat does have the connection for the air tube, he did me a nice job for a decent price so want complain too much, should I worry bout it
are you getting any codes? I would imagine that would need to be hooked up, maybe EGR codes or emmissions ?
 

·
Side step it
Joined
·
1,583 Posts
Or a smog guy since the bar now makes them look under the vehicle to be sure the cats have a EO # etc. on them......use the Bassani hose and wrap it in header wrap or something like that, good up to 300+ degs...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
just had my exhaust done last week, exhaust guy just left my tube hanging......... he told me don't worry about......which I'm really not, but don't like the idea of it just hanging there, my new high flow cat does have the connection for the air tube, he did me a nice job for a decent price so want complain too much, should I worry bout it
when i just left it hanging, someone on this forum told me if i dont hook it up the cat aint gonna last very long. something about fresh air from the smog pump. is this right? cuz i havnt hooked it up yet
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
26,300 Posts
when i just left it hanging, someone on this forum told me if i dont hook it up the cat aint gonna last very long. something about fresh air from the smog pump. is this right? cuz i havnt hooked it up yet
Yeah, it is alluded to/addressed in TSB 91-12-11 Converter Diagnosis ;
".... Verify proper operation of the thermactor system. Thermactor systems that fail to dump thermactor air to the atmosphere properly or at the correct time can cause high catalyst temperatures.

TSB 91-12-11 Converter Diagnosis

Publication Date: JUNE 12, 1991

LIGHT TRUCK: 1986-91 BRONCO, ECONOLINE, F-150-350 SERIES
1988-91 F SUPER DUTY, F47

ISSUE: Lack of power or a no start condition may be diagnosed as an exhaust restriction caused by a plugged catalytic converter. A plugged catalytic converter (internal deterioration) is usually caused by abnormal engine operation.

ACTION: Diagnose the catalytic converter to confirm internal failure. Refer to the Catalyst and Exhaust System Diagnostic Section, in the Engine/Emissions Diagnostic Shop Manual and the following procedures for service details.

SERVICE PROCEDURE
1. Lack of proper HEGO operation may cause, or be the result of a rich or lean fuel condition, which could cause additional heat in the catalyst. Perform self test KOEO and KOER, service any codes.
NOTE: IF TWO DIGIT CODES 41, 42, 85 OR THREE DIGIT CODES 171, 172, 173, 179, 181, 182, 183 AND 565 ARE RECIEVED, CHECK FOR PROPER HEGO GROUND.
If the HEGO ground is good, the following areas may be at fault:
* Ignition Coil
* Distributor Cap
* Distributor Rotor
* Fouled Spark Plug
* Spark Plug Wires
* Air Filter
* Stuck Open Injector
* Fuel Contamination Engine OIL
* Manifold Leaks Intake/Exhaust
* Fuel Pressure
* Poor Power Ground
* Engine Not At Normal Operating Temperature
* HEGO Sensor
2. Spark timing that is retarded from specification may increase exhaust gas temperature and shorten catalyst life. Refer to the following procedure for service details.
a. Check spark timing. Check base timing with spout disconnected. Set base timing to the specification on the vehicle emission decal.
b. Check computed timing with spout connected.
NOTE: COMPUTED TIMING IS EQUAL TO BASE TIMING PLUS 20� BTDC � 3�.
3. Misfiring spark plugs may cause an unburned fuel air mixture to pass through the catalyst, which could cause higher than normal catalyst temperatures. Refer to the following procedure for service details. Check secondary ignition, hook the vehicle up to an engine analyzer and check for a secondary ignition misfire.
NOTE: SERVICE ANY ITEM THAT IS NOT PERFORMING AT PROPER SPECIFICATIONS BEFORE CONTINUING.
4. Fuel pressure that is too high may cause rich air fuel mixtures to pass through the catalyst which could cause higher than normal catalyst temperatures. Refer to the following procedure for service details.
a. Check fuel pressure, install fuel pressure gauge, start and run the engine at idle. Fuel pressures between 28 and 34 PSI are typical (4.9L typically is 15 PSI higher).
b. Disconnect the vacuum line going to the fuel pressure regulator. Fuel pressure typically jumps to 40 PSI � 3 PSI (4.9L typically is 15 PSI higher). Visually inspect vacuum line for raw fuel.
NOTE: FUEL PRESSURES ABOVE THESE VALUES SHOULD BE CORRECTED. HOWEVER, THIS MAY NOT BE THE CAUSE OF THE CONCERN. SERVICE AS NECESSARY.
5. Throttle plates in the throttle body not returning to the proper closed position may cause excessive catalyst temperatures during downhill grades. Refer to the following procedure for service details. Visually inspect the throttle body and linkage for:
* Binding or sticking throttle linkage.
* Tight speed control linkage or cable.
* Vacuum line interference.
* Electrical harness interference.
NOTE: AFTERMARKET GOVERNORS, THROTTLE LINKAGE AND CABLES ASSOCIATED WITH POWER TAKE-OFF UNITS, MAY ALSO INTERFERE WITH PROPER THROTTLE RETURN. SERVICE AS NECESSARY.
6. It is extremely important that all systems related to the engine and emission systems operate properly.
a. Visually inspect the engine compartment to make sure all vacuum hoses and spark plug wires are properly routed and securely connected.
b. Inspect all wiring harnesses and connectors for insulation damage, burned, overheated, loose or broken conditions.
c. Verify proper operation of the thermactor system. Thermactor systems that fail to dump thermactor air to the atmosphere properly or at the correct time can cause high catalyst temperatures.
d. Visually inspect thermactor system for damaged or kinked hoses and perform a function test on following components: air control valve, check valve, silencer, filter and the air bypass solenoid.
e. Verify proper operation of the engine cooling system thermostat.

OTHER APPLICABLE ARTICLES: NONE
WARRANTY STATUS: Eligible Under Basic Warranty Coverage, Emissions Warranty Coverage

OPERATION DESCRIPTION TIME
911211A Diagnostics - Perform KOEO And KOER Self Tests 0.5 Hrs.
911211B Timing - Check Or Adjust Spark Timing, Check Computed Timing And Check Secondary Ignition System With Engine Analyzer 0.5 Hrs.
911211C Check - Fuel Pressure And Inspect Vacuum Line For Raw Fuel 0.2 Hrs.
911211D Inspect - Throttle Body And Linkage 0.1 Hrs.
911211E Inspect - Vacuum Hoses, Electrical Harnesses, Connectors And Spark Plug Wires For Routing Damage 0.1 Hrs.
911211F Thermactor System - Inspect For Proper Operation And Damaged Component. Includes Function Check Of Air Control Valve, Thermactor Air Bypass Solenoid, Check Valves, Silencer And Filter 0.3 Hrs.
911211G Thermostat - Check For Proper Operation 0.2 Hrs.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top