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Discussion Starter #1
There have been a lot of issues surrounding the repair of the rear window motor.
Now, when mine finally went out, the motor would spin but, the window would not move.
Many of us have had this same problem. I will not be discussing the removal of the regulator at this time.
First, but the repair kit. There have been talks about using several 3/8 nuts for this but, I was still leery about that so, I decided to just pick up a repair kit from Discount Auto Parts.


The part number is 74410 from Discount Auto Parts.
Ok..
BEFORE YOU TAKE OFF THE MOTOR, MAKE SURE THAT THE REGULATOR IS ALL THE WAY IN THE UP POSITION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This is for your safety. You can very easily break your hand if you do not do this.

The motor is held on by three small screws.
Notice that my regulator is NOT in the full up position at this time. Once I pulled the motor out, the regulator “snapped” up with a LOT of force. I got lucky.

This is what it looks like after that regulator snaps up.
Notice where the motor was sitting. If I had my left hand there while pulling the motor out…..
OK so, you got the motor off the regulator and you are not bleeding yet.
Good for you.

There are four screws that hold the plate onto the front side of the motor. The gear you see there is metal.

See those little bits of shiny in the grease? Yeah… that is bad. Those are the remains of the plugs that used to be in there. All that crap needs to come out.
As a general rule of thumb. Chunky = bad. This applies to grease as well as women.

The gear set does come completely out with a little bit of coaxing which makes it easier to clean out with some rags or paper towels.

This, for me, was the hardest part.
Apply just a tiny bit of grease back into the receiver part of the gear set.
Then, take the plugs from the repair kit and set them in there. The grease will kinds hold them in place.
Finally, put the other part of the gears back into the receiver. You will need to align the plugs with the slots on the smaller part. It can be a tad bit tricky and an extra set of hands will help.

Once everything is lined up, gently tap it all the way in with the palm of your hand and then re-grease everything. I just used axle grease.

Screw the backing plate back on and bolt it back to the regulator.

I went ahead and hit the regulator with white lithium grease before putting it back in the tailgate.

And that’s it.
 

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You were correct in being leery of using the 3/8" nuts for a repair------given that the proper size nuts are actually 1/4". Just like thousands of us have used in the past.

Oil well, it's your money...........
 

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Btw, did you drill 3 new access holes in your tailgate, to facillitate the removal and replacement of your motor? Makes all the world of difference and saves a helluva lot of time..........
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You were correct in being leery of using the 3/8" nuts for a repair------given that the proper size nuts are actually 1/4". Just like thousands of us have used in the past.

Oil well, it's your money...........
I suppose that would be the problem then.
The plugs were $7.00 and, for me, the nuts were a gamble that I just did not want to take.
I will probably grab one from the junkyard and try the 1/4 nut way just to see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Btw, did you drill 3 new access holes in your tailgate, to facillitate the removal and replacement of your motor? Makes all the world of difference and saves a helluva lot of time..........
No I did not. I am going to be buying a new tailgate within a year or so and I plan on putting in a new motor along with the old regulator and any other parts I can resue.
The holes seem like a good idea.
 

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No I did not. I am going to be buying a new tailgate within a year or so and I plan on putting in a new motor along with the old regulator and any other parts I can resue.
The holes seem like a good idea.

Two of the three 7/16" holes I drilled are covered by the sheet metal cover plate, so I only have one that is exposed. Just a matter of finding an appropriate sized thin black plastic or rubber snap-in plug and you'd never notice it.........
 

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As a side note: These plugs are also the part that fails on many a Ford power window. If you are unable to get to a store and need the window to work for a while quick; you can remove the gear parts, clean ALL the grease and glop off (as stated above) and mix up enough 2 part epoxy to 1/2 fill the cavity in the white nylon gear and put the metal gear back in. As you push the metal gear into the epoxy, the epoxy level will rise until it nearly fills the hole in the nylon gear. Totally filling the gap with epoxy isn't necessary but a good amount in there is better. You don't need to worry about lining up the teeth or plug holes since the motor spins free and only stops when the window hits the end of it's travel or you release the button. Be sure to let the epoxy set with the metal gear UP before you put the gear case back into the door so the epoxy doesn't ooze out and foul the gears. Reassemble the gear case, add some grease and reinstall.

I've had to perform this emergency repair a few times for myself and friends and kept a lot of interiors dry from approaching rain storms. I wanted to test the durability of my method so when I bought my 1994 Bronco in June 2009 and it's windows were erratic, I fixed BOTH of my the front window motors this way and they are BOTH still working smooth, fast and quiet as of this writing (August 2010). The epoxy I used has a little flexibility to it when it sets and it seems to duplicate the effects of the commercial plugs.

-Bill
 

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Very nice write up Brother, marking this bad boy for reference ~ :thumbup
 

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As a side note: These plugs are also the part that fails on many a Ford power window.
I always use the nuts otherwise those plastic pieces will break again at some point. Not saying they will for a long time but I didn't know parts stores sold them haha. Best part is you can use that trick for all the window motors!
 

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When mine wen tout, I replaced mine with the kit that also included the gears. Surprisingly, it was about $5 cheaper than just getting the plugs. I'd read about using the1/4" nuts but wondered if they would eventually wear out the inner plastic pieces.
 

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""BEFORE YOU TAKE OFF THE MOTOR, MAKE SURE THAT THE REGULATOR IS ALL THE WAY IN THE UP POSITION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This is for your safety. You can very easily break your hand if you do not do this.

The motor is held on by three small screws.
Notice that my regulator is NOT in the full up position at this time. Once I pulled the motor out, the regulator “snapped” up with a LOT of force. I got lucky.""

I owe you a six-pack, Bro. After reading your thread, I had to pull my motor assembly out.

Thanks to your advice, I used a piece of high strength ss wire to hold the "bear trap" in place so I could remove the motor.



Once the motor was removed, I could un-wrap the wire on one side to let it release. The spring is manageable, but at full swing it could take out a knuckle or wrist.

Thanks for the heads up and "I owe ya!"

woolf
 

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Discussion Starter #12
""BEFORE YOU TAKE OFF THE MOTOR, MAKE SURE THAT THE REGULATOR IS ALL THE WAY IN THE UP POSITION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This is for your safety. You can very easily break your hand if you do not do this.

The motor is held on by three small screws.
Notice that my regulator is NOT in the full up position at this time. Once I pulled the motor out, the regulator “snapped” up with a LOT of force. I got lucky.""

I owe you a six-pack, Bro. After reading your thread, I had to pull my motor assembly out.

Thanks to your advice, I used a piece of high strength ss wire to hold the "bear trap" in place so I could remove the motor.



Once the motor was removed, I could un-wrap the wire on one side to let it release. The spring is manageable, but at full swing it could take out a knuckle or wrist.

Thanks for the heads up and "I owe ya!"

woolf
Cool trick.
Happy to help.
 

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IIRC my 86 had the TG power window motor riveted to the backing plate with "torque pins" so the motor won't ratchet back and forth when it's activated.

For remounting the motor to the backing plate not having the TP kit and tool I found nice short, grade 8 bolts with the nuts with plastic lock inserts to keep it from backing off.

Though the bolts weren't an exact fit I used heat shrink just on the bolt shaft that goes thru the pw motor head "housing" and the fit was tight and perfect...now I need a rust free TG because mine is shot all along the bottom outside skin and the along box as well......PITA....:rofl:

Thanks again for the write up...:thumbup
 

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shibby
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How do you get the tailgate window all the way up with the tailgate open?
Open tailgate, depress left side latch to bypass the safety mechanism, support glass while extending the window by pressing the power switch. An adjustable stand works great for this-

 

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A quickie update: Due to the very cold winter, the epoxy repair finally gave up. It is safe to say that the epoxy trick does last a while but after 1 1/2 years of use, it will finally break apart and fail. From what I can tell, these little plugs are between the gears to absorb the shock of the window hitting the top and bottom of it's track. The nuts don't absorb anything and will very likely cause motor or gear damage eventually. I'm pretty sure that a 10-15 year life is a small price to pay for having a working power window. A quick fix is always better than a busted truck, but a correct repair will pay off in the end. Happy Trucking!
 

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shibby
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I've always thought it was a designed weak link. It's cheaper to replace the phenolic pins than it is to replace the gear set/motor.
 

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motor can be removed without removing regulator and without drilling holes, just takes more time. I was afraid of breaking my hand
 

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Unless replacing the reg, I don't see any reason to remove it from a time stand point. The method by dustball above has always worked well for me. I've stacked coolers, garbage cans w/ books on top, etc... to get the right height to support the window. All works just the same.
 

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Do0es anyone know what size the 3 screws are that hold the motor in? I have been having hell finding some that fit exactly. 10-32 have the right thread pitch but are not quite big enough around.
 
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