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1992 EB Bronco, 351W, E4OD, 3.55, 33x10.5 mostly stock at this point
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217 Posts
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When i got my Bronco the AC did not work and come to find out the PO had jumpered the safety switch and ran it anyways (with a leak). So im pretty sure the entire system is toast and i dont see the point in spending much time monkeying with the old r22 stuff anyways. My thoughts are to replace everything with new from what i am thinking would be a 94-96 bronco. My wonder is if there was any changes to the systems between those years. My main goal is to swap all standard 134 components from years that came with that system to start with. However when i search things like condensers and evaps they have different part numbers through rockauto. Ive also noticed some have threaded connections vs springlock connections.

Has anyone done this type of swap? I just hate to buy $400 worth of parts "in hopes" of them fitting.
 

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1981 Bronco, 4.9L, ZF5, NP208, Detroit Truetracs, 3.55 gears, 31" Wranglers front and rear
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3,142 Posts
Has anyone done this type of swap?
I did it on my 81, but that's a little different.

I just got a later compressor off a 93 (I think) F150. You don't have to limit yourself to Broncos as F150s are the same.

These systems can be taken out of Broncos and F150s without breaking the system open. So if you can find a donor at the junkyard that may be your best option. It's really a 2 person job to be able to keep from kinking or breaking the lines at the condenser and evaporator.
 

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1988 Bronco XLT 302, 5 Speed manual 1994 E.B. 351
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143 Posts
The refrigerant in these trucks was not R22, it was R12.
The only difference is the expansion devise / restrictor.
Don't change all the components.
There are kits available to convert from R12 to R134.
Call NAPA see what they offer.
 

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1986 Bronco Eddie Bauer 5.0 mostly stock
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2,641 Posts
All you “need” is 12 to 134 adapters, a new dryer, some flush, PAG oil, new refrigerant, and new o rings and a new orfice tube. The condenser, compressor, evaporator and hoses will all interchange.

You need to evacuate the 12 if it’s still in there, disconnect the system at all the points there is an oring, replace them, flush all the components (except the compressor and I don’t recommend flushing the condenser unless you can tip it upside down to make sure you get all the flush out), install the new dryer and orfice tube, install the adapters, reconnect all the lines, pull a vacuum, check for leaks, recharge….done it twice so far and as far as I know both are still cooling (I know one is the other I sold).
Now you can get a 134 condenser and it may do better but so far I’m good with the original 12 one.

That’s not everything, so do more research, watch some videos or take it to a qualified HVAC guy.


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My 1993 F 150 had no factory ac, which would have been an R12 system if it had AC.
I installed all new 94/97 134a components into this truck.
All components were spec'ed out for a 95 model year.

The 93's grill support bracket need to be replaced with the 94 up grill support bracket to clear the larger 134a condenser.
Most aftermarket 134a replacement condensers will not fit any of the 92/97 trucks without some minor trimming of the core support. Not a big deal if you take your time.


My donor ac/heater box (from a 95) bolted right in to my 93 which took care of any discrepancy regarding the evaporator, but I am not sure if the 92/93 evaporator area is any different than the 94/97 ac/heater box. That will be for you to research.
One difference in heater boxes in this model year range is that mid 95 and later heater boxes used an improved pull/pull temp selector -vs- the old push/pull of the earlier models


I believe the FS10 compressor is the same no matter the refrigerant type

One other thing to take note of: The 92/93 R12 system has no exterior high pressure cut off switch like the 134a systems have mounted to the back of the compressor but it will still work just fine. Because of this the 92/93 have no wiring for the later style 134a high pressure switch.
Looking at a wiring diagram from Alldata shows that the 92/93 R12 compressor power feed utilizes a different method for high pressure regulation as noted in the language on the diagram.

It would likely be much easier to convert what you have over to 134a but swapping out to all new stuff is not too terribly bad either.
 
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