Bronco Forum - Full Size Ford Bronco Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been starting to do some research on ground based heat pump geothermal heating/cooling systems. I understand the concept of how it works, but to save money is this something I could install myself, or leave to proffesionals??

Also, I talked with a co-worker earlier that used to be in the HVAC trade a few years back, and he suggested going with air sourced pump instead og ground- said it would cost less, but admitted it would not be as efficient- Thoughts??
 

·
Man with a Golden ticket
Joined
·
4,003 Posts
Been starting to do some research on ground based heat pump geothermal heating/cooling systems. I understand the concept of how it works, but to save money is this something I could install myself, or leave to proffesionals??

Also, I talked with a co-worker earlier that used to be in the HVAC trade a few years back, and he suggested going with air sourced pump instead og ground- said it would cost less, but admitted it would not be as efficient- Thoughts??
I think you took a wrong turn in Albuqurque there Bugs cus this aint MENSA :rolleyes:

But I did stay at a Holiday Inn once. :thumbup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Geothermal probably isn't anything you want to mess with on your own. a thermal well has to be drilled, the depth of which is determined by the geology of where you live.

Around me (st. louis) they "only" have to drill about 500 feet to get ground temperatures high enough to actually heat your home. The drill crew was out there 2 days.

Here at 500 feet it'll keep your house at 60 in the winter and 70 in the summer. If you want it warmer in the winter, you run a standard furnace to supplement the geothermal.

The other part becomes if it isn't consistently below 60 (or whatever ground temperature they hit -5 degrees) during your winter, geothermal won't pay for itself.

However here in St. Louis it took my next door neighbor's gas bill from $600 a month december-february and knocked it down to about $75.

Justin
 

·
Formerly vt89gtvert
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
I manage a property with these, and if not installed properly they can be a MAJOR pain. You need to make sure all the pipe are sealed exactly as they are supposed. If the coolant that is circulating is as much as a cup or two low it can dramaticly effect the efficiency of the unit (Air bubbles form, thus reducing the heat transfer). Also have to make sure there is proper pressure in the system. You will also want to have some type of aux heat for the REALLY cold night, and for if the system goes down. I would definatly recommend a Pro do the instal. Plus most systems will not even think about covering the warrenty unless someone who is certified in Geo's installs the system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,847 Posts
My parents in Texas have this, they have had it for about 10 years I think. Definantly not a DIY project, as mentioned earlier they have to dig pretty deep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Dont even try this yourself. There is alot involved.

Air sourced heat pumps are fine in warmer climates where temps rarely drop below 40*. Under 40* they become inefficient and gas becomes more efficient.

Geothermal units are all around better but cost a fortune for equipment/installation. They work below the frost line where temps are not changing like outside air. Geo systems can also be tied into the hot water system to save $$ there too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Ok, go with a pro installation, But theres no reason I cant rent/borrow a trencher and put the lines in the ground myself.

I only recently became aware of the "pond" system. Seems like the underground lines would be better,, no?? I DO have a pond fairly close to the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I'm looking at putting a geothermal system in a building I'm currently working on. Here we estimate a 300' deep well will deliver 2 tons of cooling for a closed loop. This is for a small commercial building that requires 20 tons so obviously we are drilling ten wells. I am using one of the wells as a test well to verify the thermal concuctivity. Also these have to spaced about 20' o.c.
I did find a different system in my research called slinky coils. They run a tight plastic coil in a three foot deep trench which concentrates the heat transfer into a smaller volume. It doesn't require as much land use. Seems like a decent system for residential use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
There is no part of these systems that should be attempted unless your a Hvac dork like me.:smilie_slapYou cannot have the lines too close together and the trench better be deeper than 3' or you can cause a mini Grand Canyon in your back yard. Well is the best route but most pricey, ponds work fine, but the trenches have to be deep. Systems installed years ago before our national drought are causing the ground to split and killing grass. When we install fields we cannot see out of the trenches and I'm about 6'. There are also special fitting and techniques to installing the loops, they are melted together and it is very touchy............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
547 Posts
:chili::chili::chili::chili:

I have put geothermal systems in many commercial buildings here in Nebraska. The typical install involves 20 plus vertical ground loops about 250 feet deep each. I prefer clusters of 8 in a 50 foot radius. All run in parallel in a closed loop. It is easier to get good density per square foot of ground that way.

Further, you need to use water source heat pumps to move heat to and from this water loop. A typical residential consists of 2 250 foot vertical loops at least 25 feet apart and piped in parallel. This gives an easy 4.5 - 5 ton of heat or cooling. The return water temp is about 52 degrees.

I fully support the use of closed loop geothermal systems. Their efficiency is great. the only down side is the cost of installation. A 250 foot deep hole is about 8 bucks a foot around here. if you have questions you are welcome to PM me.

Kevin
 

·
Practicing Infidel
Joined
·
15,297 Posts
I had a ground source (well) heatpump at my third last place.

I was able to run it off my drinking well and dump it into a French well on the corner of the property, but I was grandfathered in.

Up here, and I'll bet most states, have you digging up your whole yard to put loops in now. Water saving pricks !

I saved a bundle on heating and cooling. When teh original heat pump blew up I replaced it with a Florida heat pump of about 3 tonnes (for a 1200 sq ft bungalow {overkill is my hobby:toothless).

Sixlitre
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top