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Greetings! Been lurking for a while, did a search and didn't come up with what I need so I thought I'd just ask. A few months back I picked up and 85 Bronco with a Six cylinder and 4 speed. 138k on the clock, runs and drives good but needs a lot of love...squirrels had been living in the back seat at one time and it spent it's whole life in the Owens Valley (high desert) so almost no rust but it seems like dirt has been packed into every corner of, well, everything.

I've completely disassembled the interior and although its a base model truck (the one with the hardboard side panels in the rear and no carpet) it does have AC. Doesn't work, no surprise, but it appears to be all there and I figured while I have the dash apart I can replace the hoses if I need to. I'm comfortable working on most parts of a vehicle but I just don't know much about air conditioning, other than I really like to have it in a car or truck! The hose connections don't look right to me on the compressor so I've taken pictures of all the connections under the hood and would appreciate any feedback on what's right, wrong, or missing. I think this was a dealer installed option, correct?

The compressor:



Another part:


The condenser connections:



Appreciate any help, thanks!
 

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Here's the overall view, the truck has fairly new tires <1000 mi, current tags, got it for $900...didn't need it, just couldn't pass it up.




 

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I would replace all those AC hoses. Maybe the evaporator as well. EIther have the condensor flushed or get a new one too. $500 in parts to replace everything. Then you will know it all will work. LMC Truck and NPD have most stuff. Also check ebay for some deals. you might want to convert it over to 134a while your at it.
 

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I would also suggest a small bottle of this to help clean up that engine bay. Just wear gloves, use it straight. dont get it in your eyes. spray it on, scrub any buildup, rinse it off. repeat till clean. works like nothing i have ever tried before.

 

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Greetings! Been lurking for a while, did a search and didn't come up with what I need so I thought I'd just ask. A few months back I picked up and 85 Bronco with a Six cylinder and 4 speed. 138k on the clock, runs and drives good but needs a lot of love...squirrels had been living in the back seat at one time and it spent it's whole life in the Owens Valley (high desert) so almost no rust but it seems like dirt has been packed into every corner of, well, everything.

I've completely disassembled the interior and although its a base model truck (the one with the hardboard side panels in the rear and no carpet) it does have AC. Doesn't work, no surprise, but it appears to be all there and I figured while I have the dash apart I can replace the hoses if I need to. I'm comfortable working on most parts of a vehicle but I just don't know much about air conditioning, other than I really like to have it in a car or truck! The hose connections don't look right to me on the compressor so I've taken pictures of all the connections under the hood and would appreciate any feedback on what's right, wrong, or missing. I think this was a dealer installed option, correct?


Appreciate any help, thanks!
You really should get all new hoses. The only time hose clamps are acceptable on an ac system is on the low pressure side when adding an inline filter. Your high pressure side can run a couple hundred psi, so Hose clamps there are a big no no. IMHO it looks like some lines blew out and someone clamped on generic hose. Every hose should have it's own fitting, a stock system shouldn't have any hose clamps. While your doing this you should upgrade to barrier hoses, swap out the orifice tube, and install fittings to convert to r134a. R12 is expensive and getting harder and harder to come by.

As you can see from this picture all the ac lines should be hose clamp free.

You seem to have a slightly different compressor, but still your hoses shouldn't be hacked together like that, how they haven't blown out yet I have no idea.
 

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The system in your truck is an aftermarket setup. It could be dealer or independent shop installed, but it is not a factory setup. The hose/clamp design is common for older R12 aftermarket systems and worked fine for that chemical. From the pic of the compressor it appears someone has tried to convert it to R134a already. The last pic shows where the system has leaked out (dirt crusted to the oil that escaped the system).

To get the system working again you will likely need to replace/update all the hoses, the condenser and the receiver/dryer. I would consider talking to a shop that does aftermarket installations in your area about recommending where and what parts to source to get it running again. You don't need them to do the work, just ask them if they can help you with sourcing the parts.

pfun41- The reason his hoses are different is that the truck in your picture is a factory A/C system where as his is an aftermarket. The hose clamp design was very common in older aftermarket systems. It worked fine back in the day with R12, but will leak easily with R134a.
 

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I would also suggest a small bottle of this to help clean up that engine bay. Just wear gloves, use it straight. dont get it in your eyes. spray it on, scrub any buildup, rinse it off. repeat till clean. works like nothing i have ever tried before.

Thanks for the tip! Hard to believe, but what you see now has been treated to 3 cans of Gunk and 20 minutes with a pressure washer. Everything that can leak oil does leak oil and did for a long, long time. When I'm done with the inside I think I'm just going to pull the engine and replace all the gaskets, oil pump, clutch, and paint the motor. I'm old enough to prefer working on the engine sitting on a stool rather than bent over a fender.
 

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I started out to do the same sort of thing on my engine. Just clean it up and paint it and swap out all the hoses and gaskets. Yea, that was the initial plan at least. After taking it all apart and seeing 2 inches of encrusted sludge on every piece inside the motor, I ended up getting a new long block and rebuilding.

So just be prepared for what you find. That POR15 cleaner is an absolute miracle solution. You will be impressed.
 

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The system in your truck is an aftermarket setup. It could be dealer or independent shop installed, but it is not a factory setup. The hose/clamp design is common for older R12 aftermarket systems and worked fine for that chemical. From the pic of the compressor it appears someone has tried to convert it to R134a already. The last pic shows where the system has leaked out (dirt crusted to the oil that escaped the system).

To get the system working again you will likely need to replace/update all the hoses, the condenser and the receiver/dryer. I would consider talking to a shop that does aftermarket installations in your area about recommending where and what parts to source to get it running again. You don't need them to do the work, just ask them if they can help you with sourcing the parts.

pfun41- The reason his hoses are different is that the truck in your picture is a factory A/C system where as his is an aftermarket. The hose clamp design was very common in older aftermarket systems. It worked fine back in the day with R12, but will leak easily with R134a.
Thanks Mike, I thought the AC was aftermarket. It's not integrated very well with the heater like a factory setup would be. The cold air coil (?) is under the dash cap and when the cap is removed you can still get the hose fittings without too much difficulty. Maybe the AC will be one of the last tasks to be done. We have a home in the Owens Valley and the truck will be going back up there when it's done and AC is REALLY nice to have up there!
 

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you could also hit the junk yard and pull the AC/Heater box out of a similar year truck that came with factory air. Might make things easier for you in the long run.
 

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Swapping to factory A/C is certainly the way to go. But if you swap to '85 factory A/C, you'll still have to convert to R134a.

If you convert to serpentine belt (which is easier than it may sound, and has a LOT of advantages), you can find a complete '94-97 system in a JY truck, and drop it into yours complete & running.
http://www.supermotors.net/registry/media/994176
If swapping to a serpentine belt, does one have to change to a reverse rotation waterpump?
 

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Of course. But since he's already going to have the engine out to replace all the gaskets, it'll be pretty easy. So would the Saginaw & 3G swaps, which are other reasons to do it.
Saginaw and 3G? You have piqued my interest...I'm not familiar with what a JY truck is, I assume it's the next generation that uses a serpentine belt. I hadn't considered it, but I do really like the idea, along with electric fans. More trips to the wrecking yard, gawd I hate that! ;)
 

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Saginaw and 3G? You have piqued my interest...I'm not familiar with what a JY truck is, I assume it's the next generation that uses a serpentine belt. I hadn't considered it, but I do really like the idea, along with electric fans. More trips to the wrecking yard, gawd I hate that! ;)
JY- Junkyard.
 
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