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Formerly vt89gtvert
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a chance at buying a Hobart 135 in Imaculate condition for $250. I am looking for something to learn to weld on that is fairly capable at the same time. I am still waiting on the responce as to if it come with the gas set-up.

1. Does anyone have some experince with it? All the online reviews I have found seam to be positive.

2. I think the $250 is a ood price, but I will be driving 3 hours ($50 in gas) to get it. Do you think it is still worth it?

3. Other input is VERY welcome....


Thanks in advance.
 

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a good friend of mine has that welder and its great its worth it IMHO i want to get that exact same one great for begginners and it can weld up to 1/4 inch which is plenty for off road fabrication good deal i want the same one
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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Yeah wtf.. I've always heard Hobart and Lincoln were great makers of welders.
Agreed, someone should put the pipe down. Hobart even uses a Miller gun. Mine's been outstanding.

The Miller brand I think most would say is better. Other than that the 2 names I would also trust are Hobart and Lincoln.


back to the question though, if you can get the seller to throw the gas in that would be great, seeing as the gauges, tank and filling the tank will run you over $100 all depending on tank size you'd have to buy.

also, to help recoup your gas, ask if it has a spool already on it (spools can be like a 2 lb. deal or I just went and bought the 11lb spool so as not to worry about it), that helps too. You might even want to ask if it comes with a cart. I made mine but these days steel is pretty pricey so if you made one or bought one, that roughly another $50 or so.
 

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I have a hobart 187 and its works just fine so i dont know where you get that hobart
welders are low quality.
They are good welders for home owners but not shop grade unless you buy the larger commercial ones. They are low grade Millers meaning they have lower end transformers in them (not cheap ones just not the heavy ones the miller line carries).

If it comes with the bottle and regulator then I would say go for it if you are not going to do ALOT of welding. If it doesnt come with the bottle and regulator I would not buy it. Also if you do plan on doing alot of welding you need to look for a larger machine with a longer duty cycle, trust me on this!!!

Good luck
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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They are good welders for home owners but not shop grade unless you buy the larger commercial ones. They are low grade Millers meaning they have lower end transformers in them (not cheap ones just not the heavy ones the miller line carries).

If it comes with the bottle and regulator then I would say go for it if you are not going to do ALOT of welding. If it doesnt come with the bottle and regulator I would not buy it. Also if you do plan on doing alot of welding you need to look for a larger machine with a longer duty cycle, trust me on this!!!

Good luck
Ok, so the transformers will affect duty cycle correct? I can see the comparison and statement of hobart not being ready for industrial/heavy use in that the hobart 115 (which I think then became the 135, both are 110V) have a 20% duty cycle, and my 230 has a 30% duty cycle.

So, 2 mins continuous welding/8 mins rest. Mine is 3mins/7 mins. Does not sound like much, but for me, I've NEVER gotten near 3 mins. of continous use...just have not had any projects requiring that much welding.

but on a job site where the welder is constantly used, I can see this not being adequate. Not to mention Hobart states that exceeding the duty cycle can damage the unit (gun and transformers I think) and void the warranty.

nothing wrong with the unit whatsoever, just not ready for industrial/constant use. And on the flip side, the price shows it. the industrial stuff is dang expensive.
 

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I'd say it's a good deal. A friend has one and has used it for sliders and exo stuff happily. Use gas for the thin stuff, flux core for 1/4", and you should be good to go.
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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I'd say it's a good deal. A friend has one and has used it for sliders and exo stuff happily. Use gas for the thin stuff, flux core for 1/4", and you should be good to go.
Why would you say to use gas (assume you mean c25 mix) for thin and flux core (self-shielding, good for outdoors/wind) for thicker stuff?

That would be a total PITA to have to change the wire spool every time, not to mention the polarity.:popc1:


I use gas for all the sliders and heavy welding, period. If you're in a garage this works great, less mess as well.
 

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Why would you say to use gas (assume you mean c25 mix) for thin and flux core (self-shielding, good for outdoors/wind) for thicker stuff?
You can weld thicker metal with less amperage using flux core, at least according to the sticker on the side of my Hobart.
 

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Formerly vt89gtvert
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the input guys. The prie does include the regulator, but no tanks, or cart. I was planning on making the cart my first project, and finding a tank on CL. I really do know absolutly nothing about welding. I just found most people say stick to the big three (Miller, lincoln, Hobart), 110 is for learning and light duty, gas capable is a must, and practice practice practice.

I am also looking at the Northern Tool auto darkening helmet for a weekend warrier like me.

Other then the tank, is there anything else I will need to look for?
 

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Flux does penetrate deepr, because of the poliarty it uses, not the process itself. But I would rather lay another bead with mig than do all the clean up that flux needs. Also in windy conditions you can turn up the shielding gas if you have an adjustable regulator, it helps alot.
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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You can weld thicker metal with less amperage using flux core, at least according to the sticker on the side of my Hobart.
Good to know for folks. I did check my manual (it's a dual manual for 115v and 230v) and sure enough you folks are right with the 115v. The flux seems the better choice for 115 to maximize it. Would not even bother with a gas setup.
 

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my workplace runs all OLD hobarts(220) They purchased a few lincoln 3-4 years ago and belive it or not, they are just as sh!tty as the hobarts now. i would never buy a hobart(if I had the choice) there are only a select few that will lay agood CONSISTANT bead out of 25-30

BUT

You can't beat that price. do it up
 

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There is nothing wrong with hobart. i have use all three machines and own all three brands (hob 180, lincoln pt225,miller thunderbolt). For your app get it and start welding. Practice is the key you will need lots ofit. Get a good helmet your eyes are pretty hard to replace.
Have fun and start burning metal. I would however suggest a 220 machine if at all possible. if it is out of the budget then get the 110 that is the way i did it alsowish i would have saved a little longer and got the220 from the getgo..

crank
 

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Billdo
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Thanks for the input guys. The prie does include the regulator, but no tanks, or cart. I was planning on making the cart my first project, and finding a tank on CL. I really do know absolutly nothing about welding. I just found most people say stick to the big three (Miller, lincoln, Hobart), 110 is for learning and light duty, gas capable is a must, and practice practice practice.

I am also looking at the Northern Tool auto darkening helmet for a weekend warrier like me.

Other then the tank, is there anything else I will need to look for?

yea make sure theres a flux core nozzle, brass gas nozzle for mig, gas hose, some contact tips probably .025s and .035s, and the wire guides and drive rolls for those wire sizes.
 

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Formerly vt89gtvert
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
There is nothing wrong with hobart. i have use all three machines and own all three brands (hob 180, lincoln pt225,miller thunderbolt). For your app get it and start welding. Practice is the key you will need lots ofit. Get a good helmet your eyes are pretty hard to replace.
Have fun and start burning metal. I would however suggest a 220 machine if at all possible. if it is out of the budget then get the 110 that is the way i did it alsowish i would have saved a little longer and got the220 from the getgo..

crank
I thought about this issue as well, but if nothing else I should be able to sell the welder for close the what I paid for it, and it will help greatly withthe upcoming SAS. I have pretty much decided to get it, now I am just trying to convince one of my buddies to make the trip with me to go get it.

Also need to decide if the $50 Northern Tool helpmet is nice enough to buy.....
 

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Former owner of Shadofax
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I thought about this issue as well, but if nothing else I should be able to sell the welder for close the what I paid for it, and it will help greatly withthe upcoming SAS. I have pretty much decided to get it, now I am just trying to convince one of my buddies to make the trip with me to go get it.

Also need to decide if the $50 Northern Tool helpmet is nice enough to buy.....
on the helmet that's a pretty decent price for auto darkening, and I would highly recommend one, having not done so yet myself, but it's at the top of the Holiday list this year. It's not easy flipping the visor down and starting your weld, at least I'm not very good at it.

you reminded me though, seems like I've seen several people use old bed frames (steel of course) to make the frame for their welder cart, and you used to be able to find old frames thrown out in dumpsters. They are actually the perfect thickness of angle steel for the job, and should be free if you can find one.

Also, if you go to Hobart's site (think that's where I went), they have an area for projects and that's where I downloaded the instructions for the cart I made, well except for the tennis racket handle and rollers from harbor freight:

 
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