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I recently did a cluster swap in my 84 Bronco. I swapped in a cluster that has a tach & a resettable trip odometer.

Everything seems to be working great. My question is about the oil, temp, & charge gauge. Between the two clusters, I get different readings on those gauges.

Is there a way to test the gauges themselves?

-Nick
 

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yo,
you can check & swap from old cluster da Instrument Voltage Regulator (IVR) in 78-86; "...The IVR can fail two different ways. it will quit working altogether, thus none of the gauges will work. Or two, it will stick, and the gauges will peg to the extreme right, then it will unstick and fall back to normal. The IVR is a pulse type. The voltage is regulated by how fast the pulses are. When it sticks, it doesn't pulse, etc... Try tapping on it. Make sure the cluster ground is in good shape. If the IVR isn't grounded or has an intermittant ground, it wont pulse like it should either. Rebuild it, see http://www.turbocoupe.org/techinfo/ivr/IVR.htmold or,Suggest getting one from a Yard; Since there are about 12 different types, make sure to take the old one with you; Fits: 1971/86 F100/350; 1971/91 Econoline; 1978/86 Bronco; 1977/79 LTD II/Ranchero/Cougar/Thunderbird without Tachometer; 1972/76 Thunderbird/Continental Mark IV; 1971/72 LTD/Mercury Marquis for MOTORCRAFT Part # GR513 {D1AF10804AA, D1AZ10804A}..."
Source: by miesk5 at http://fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2458647#post2458647



Instrument Voltage Regulator (IVR) Location & Causes of Erratic Gauges in 78-86; "...The cluster "voltage regulator" is going bad, and staying on too long, sending too much current through the gauges & sensors. It has finally locked on, and is burning out your sensors every time you turn your key on. :( Remove the instrument cluster and then pop the VR off the film circuit - it's a metal box with 2 brass snaps. They're available at most parts stores for a few bucks. The hardest part will be getting the headlight & wiper knobs off, so post again if you need instructions on that.In this photo, counting from the RIGHT, it's between the 2nd & 3rd black bulb holders along the top of the cluster. You can see the hex screw holding the mounting tab, and just below that, you can see the 2 brass snap terminals..."
Source: by Steve83 http://www.supermotors.net/registry/media/76022


Instrument Voltage Regulator (IVR) Pin-Out pic in 78-86; "...Back in the early 60's when Ford originally decided to go to a 5 volt system for the instruments the electrical engineers were faced with the problem of providing the guages with 5 volts. To make a true voltage regulator with 60's era parts would have been extremely expensive and the final product would have been about the size of a bread box. No good for their purposes. But since the guages are a hot wire design that doesn't respond very quickly to changes, the engineers were able to fool the guages into thinking that they had 5 volts by pulsing 12 volts to the guages. With the technology that is now avalible the IVR can be replaced with solid state components that supply a true 5 volts to the guages and put a stop to the wild dance of the guages..." Source: by James J
 

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I'm interested in this as well, since my gauges will all climb at the same time, and then drop at the same time. The most noticeable are the temp and fuel gauge. They'll be reading normal and then climb dramatically for a while, usually around a minute, sometimes more or less, and then drop back down. (Ie. Fuel gauge pointing to 1/2. It'll climb to 3/4. Sometimes as high as F. Then drop back down to 1/2. When it climbs, the temp gauge climbs at the same rate.)

So it's possible to replace the IVR with a "solid state component"? What type of component? Where would someone get one? Any info on wiring one in?
 

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I'm interested in this as well, since my gauges will all climb at the same time, and then drop at the same time. The most noticeable are the temp and fuel gauge. They'll be reading normal and then climb dramatically for a while, usually around a minute, sometimes more or less, and then drop back down. (Ie. Fuel gauge pointing to 1/2. It'll climb to 3/4. Sometimes as high as F. Then drop back down to 1/2. When it climbs, the temp gauge climbs at the same rate.)

So it's possible to replace the IVR with a "solid state component"? What type of component? Where would someone get one? Any info on wiring one in?
yo, You can test the output to ensure that the IVR is putting out 5VDC with engine running, light on...
If it is not. then get a 12 vdc to 5 volt output DC converter
12V Regulated Power Supply
Input voltage 11 to 30v
Output 1.5 ,3 ,4.5 ,6 ,7.5 ,9 & 12vDC
Regulated output 1500mA continuous
Stable clean DC power
Designed for sensitive devices

http://www.12volt.com.au/
or

http://www.powerstream.com/dda.htm
 

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$30.95 from powerstream. Heh, that's less than a replacement voltage regulator.

Thanks for the link.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My voltage regulator seems to be working fine, just getting a variation between the different gauge clusters.
 

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My voltage regulator seems to be working fine, just getting a variation between the different gauge clusters.
yo sunwest;
For 92-96 and maybe earlier years;
The temperature gauge is a magnetic gauge movement consisting of three primary coils, one of which is wound at a 90-degree angle to the other two. The coils form a magnetic field which varies in direction according to the variable resistance of the engine coolant temperature sender unit. A primary magnet, to which a shaft and pointer are attached, rotates to align to this primary field, resulting in pointer position. The bobbin/coil assembly is pressed into a metal housing that has two holes for dial mounting. There is no adjustment, calibration or maintenance required for this gauge.

The oil pressure gauge is a magnetic movement design consisting of a bobbin/coil assembly, a return to zero magnet and a primary magnet. The shaft and pointer are connected to the primary magnet. The bobbin/coil assembly is pressed into a metal housing which has two holes for dial mounting.
The gauge operates through a pressure activated switch. When the engine is started engine oil pressure closes the switch, providing a ground circuit for the gauge coil. Current flow through the gauge coil to ground causes the primary magnet and pointer to rotate, providing an oil pressure reading on the dial face. The oil pressure gauge does not require adjustment, calibration or maintenance. Also, never remove the pointer indicator from its shaft.

The tachometer (17360) is an electrically operated gauge that indicates engine speed in rpm. In vehicles with gasoline engines (6007), the tachometer receives its voltage pulses from the ignition coil when the engine is running. In vehicles with diesel engines, the engine's speed is indicated by the engine rpm sensor.

So, check sender for each as applicable and all grounds; I have a Ground Section in my site under Electrical http://www.broncolinks.com/index.php?index=408
some Instrument Cluster grounds are inside passenger side kick panel
G201 LH rear side of I/P (looking at the diagram it is at the bottom of the driver's side dash assembly. Screwed to the bottom edge, just to the left of the steering column. It is the ground for the instrument cluster) in a 90

etc.

Could have looked up more If you posted your Year, Engine, Tranny, etc. to Signature
 
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