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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how hards is it to install lifted leafsprings yourself and what tools do u need, i just dont see how u can install them if they have mad tension in them, i was thinking of doin my rear suspension lift my self to save money, also is it hard to install a front lift on a 1993 with the non solid axel, i dont know if i shold tackle the prodject my self, any special tools do i need, and do all kits require welding, also is it true that air tools can just snap rusted bolts. thanks
 

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College User
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You can do it with just hand tools and a good jack. Air tools make it faster and easier but they can snap or round off bolts. You should not need to weld anything. I did a add a leaf, which only took a few hours including the shocks using air tools but no lift.
 

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scrounger extrordinaire
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rear leafs you should be able to do yourself. basic hand tools and some PB Blaster. start spraying the nuts of the U bolts and the shackle bolts as soon as possible. you need a good floor jack and some stands too. as for the front, i have never done an IFS lift, but i think you need a drill and possibly a torch? someone will help you out on that. but you should be able to do the rear on your own.
 

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just installed a 4inch lift on my friends 94 bronco last weekend, you need:
at least two sets of ratchets sockets and bars,
lots of PB blaster or wd40,
big C-clamps,
drill,
air tools help a lot but arnt necisary,
two jacks and at least two jack stands,
angle grinder,
heated garage,
8 hours of your and at least one good friends time,
at least a twelve pack of beer,
and to use the search function on this site,

have fun, and dont be afraid to leave it over night and come back to it, you always think clearer the next day...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
how do

aren't the leaf springs under a great deal of compression, how do you get them in there. i just dont understand how 2 people can bend the leafspring to get it to go in, am i missing something
 

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Cadillac of Men
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The leaf springs are already arched. The eye to eye distance should be the same as the mounts. Sometimes its off by an inch or two, and a pry bar is needed to get them so you can get a bolt it. Also, sometimes the bolts holding the leafs on are pretty frozen, and then you might have to sawszall them off to get the old leafs out.
 

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negative creep
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me, my dad, and plug ugly did the rear add-a-leaf in about 2 hours with a parts run, and that includes the time it took to get my old rearend out from under the bronco. i saw Chris85 pull his add-a-leaves in about 1/2 an hour. it really not hard at all to do leaf springs.

it took me almost a week to do my lift, because i had other commitments come up in the middle of working on it, but its not that hard. just follow instructions, and make sure you have plenty of tools. i think all the ones you needed were mentioned. also, make sure you have something you can drive to the store to get parts in.
 

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Ok...let me ask this then...

Which is easier, front or rear? I haven't done rear yet...but I thought my front coils and so on were cake on my 95...is the rear at all like that? I ask because I am a little imtimidated by it, and have been putting it off due to time and money oh yeah, and school...

:beer
Bill
 

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scrounger extrordinaire
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rear on your truck is same as a 78-9 its easy. front on a 78-9 really easy since its just coils & possibly "C" bushings, but on your truck its going to be more involved. there are drop brackets and other stuff
 

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5.0-BRONCO said:
i was thinking of doin my rear suspension lift my self to save money
yes, you'll save a lot of money. just do it yourself, i'd assume it's not that hard(i've installed 2 on ifs chevy's and it wasn't that hard)
like everyone has said....soak, soak and resoak everything you can think of.
 

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hates EVERYTHING!
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Ok...let me ask this then...

Which is easier, front or rear? I haven't done rear yet...but I thought my front coils and so on were cake on my 95...is the rear at all like that? I ask because I am a little imtimidated by it, and have been putting it off due to time and money oh yeah, and school...

:beer
Bill
Are you talking lift here? If you are and you've already done the front and say it's easy, then the rear's a breeze!! :beer
 

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1996 XLT 351W, 6 inch ProComp lift w/6 inch rear leaf, body lift, 35 inch tires, 4.56 gears
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I had to cut my U-bolts off when I swapped springs. Mainly due to a lot of rust, which would be a good reason to get stainless if you plan on doing it again (or some sort of coating). With plenty of penetrating oil, the rest of the bolts were no problem. The front can be a pain to get back together (align bolt holes) and a lot of the bolts need a good deal of motivation. Not to mention the rivets.
 

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Which is easier, front or rear?

Hey Bill, the front suspension is definitely more difficult and time consuming than the rear. For the rear, you just unload the leafsprings, remove the axle, and swap the leaf packs. (Unless you are keeping your stock leaves and adding a block, then the spring packs don't come out at all).

For the front, it's more than just swapping in taller coil springs. You actually have to remove both arms of the TTB (twin traction beam - the axle!) and install drop brackets before bolting the arms back up. I did this once with ProComp bracketry and there was no welding involved, but a lot of drilling for mounting all those brackets... Your measurements have to be pretty exact, but you generally have stock bolt holes to measure off of. You will probably also have to either mount extended radius arms or another set of frame drop-brackets. The steering linkage will also probably have to be modified.

Here is a great writeup you can check out: http://soderblom.net/bronco/tech/lift/

Here is a picture of my lifted TTB front end. Maybe you can compare it to your stock setup and see all the brackets I'm talking about.


and here is a shot of ProComp extended radius arms... you use the stock fram bracket, you just have to move it back on the frame a ways (can't remember the distance). Oh yeah, just remembered, it's been a while, you will need a plan to remove RIVETS, because that is how Ford chose to hold a lot of these brackets to the frame. Either heat em' up and air chisel 'em off, or drill them out... Whew, so much for my feeble brain at this hour

Posting Link:
 

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kuss said:
Which is easier, front or rear?

Maybe you can compare it to your stock setup and see all the brackets I'm talking about.


hahahaha ^^^^^^^^ It's all BLACK :histerica


here is a pic of one of the drop brackets you have to install to lift the front end ... the TTB axle arm will bolt into it. There are two holes in it as you can see to choose from either 4" or 6" of lift

 

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That procomp lift looks good...and sounds pretty easy to put in...

But I think I am going to just lift my rear end up; and for for a SAS and lift it all with leafs, then. Looks really good, though...

:beer
Bill
 

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Originally Posted by 5.0-BRONCO
i recently got into offroading, and everyone sais dont even waste your money on a 6" lift with the ttp. they say save for the sas. I recently got into offroading like i said, the worste i put my stock truck through was about 18" of snow on trails and 8" mud. i dont do extreme crawling or anything, but is it fine for moderate offroading or should i save for the straight axel, i asked you because u have a 6" lift with the ttp. is it weak or, also do u have push button 4x4. mine is makin funny noises like 3 clicks instead of one to put it into 4x4. thanks can u just give me your opinion on the ttb lift or should i just save for the straight axel. are u happy with the performance on and off road thanks.


You know, like everywhere in this world, people tend to argue strongly for whatever they personally have. There is no arguing that the solid axle is stronger... simple numbers prove that, plus there are fewer joints (which are always going to be the weakest link).

The whole idea behind modifying your suspension at all is axle articulation... the ability of one tire to stay ON THE GROUND when the other tire is going up on a rock or something. Now I'm just talking suspension here (i.e. springs), this applies to both TTB and solid axles. With stock suspensions that are very stiff, when one tire starts to go up, the other side isn't soft enough to stay on the ground. So people get longer, softer springs to allow more wheel travel. This is CRITICAL because if if the tire isn't on the ground, you're not going anywhere!!!

Some people who just want the look and could care less about off-road capability just get tall stiff springs to make the truck look big, but work even worse than stock when off-road. (** NOTE: I'm not a mudder, never will be, too much clean up, and maybe the stiff springs and height are better for mudding - I don't know but it seems they might be)

With all that being said, the design of the TTB will almost never get the same amount of axle articulation as a straight axle setup will. My TTB setup is about as soft and flexible as it gets without going to really modified TTB arms like the desert racers. I have custom coils and I'm still not thrilled with the amount of articulation. Now, there are some great engineers and fabricators out there who have made some really trick TTB systems, but there is nothing really available in an easy kit for the common man.

The straight axle swap is cheaper in the long run, in my opinion. More and more people are doing them, so the amount of info available on sites like this has really skyrocketed in the last 3-4 years. I've had my truck for 13 1/2 years now. I wheeled a little bit stock, then went to a 3" body lift, then pulled the 3" body lift and went to the 6" suspension lift you saw in the pictures. Now I'm planning to swap in a solid axle. If I ONLY KNEW that I was going to eventually have a solid axle, man, I could have saved a lot of money over the last decade! By getting into off-roading now you have the benefit of a lot of experience and you can see that everybody is going to the solid axle. The TTB is not WEAK, just WEAKER than a solid axle. I've put my rig through a lot of abuse and the TTB has always been fine.

Bottom line, the TTB is a good system for on and off-road driving. The solid axle is better off-road, arguably better on-road, and stronger without a doubt. If it helps, think of this: I don't know anyone who did a solid axle swap, then went back to the TTB!!
 

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I just finished my 6" Dick Cepek suspension lift about a week ago. It's work but nothing you can't handle. The rear is a piece of cake. The front is where all the work is. If you have a torch I would burn off the rivets that need be. The bracket that went on the drivers side for the axle pivot was a pain. I couldn't hit the punch all that good to knock the rivets out. So if you have a torch burn them out. As far as drilling new holes that are required, mount the bracket using existing holes and then drill your new holes. That way you know the holes will line up. As others have said lots of PB Blaster will help out a lot. If you are installing extended radius arms make sure you have a very deep 1 1/8" deep socket, or wrench w/ that you can get a piece of pipe over for leverage. That stud for the front spring cups and radius arm is on there tight.

I can't think of anything else so good luck and post some pics when you are done.

Oh and don't be afraid to ask questions if you get stuck! We is here to help! :thumbup
 
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