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Rest in Peace Friend...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I decided to make my own brake lines for my 84 Bronco with the F-350 axles. Bought a kit from JEG's with 25' of 3/16", galvanized steel, powdere-coated hard line, assorted fittings from 3/8" to 1/2", and a double-flare tool kit. The kit is pictured in the black plastic case. I also used some old, better-quality tools that my Dad had around the shop, which included a couple clamps, bending tool, cutter, files, etc.:



Instructions came with the kit on how to make a double-flare end on brake line:



I used the tubing cutter to cut the line:



Used a wirewheel on the bench grinder to remove the powdere coating about an inch from the end of the line. used a file to carefully chamfer the end, and de-burred the inside of the line with a 7/64" drill bit held with Vise Grips. Placing the line in the clamp in the bench vise made things easier to work with and freed up both hands:



Set the depth of the line in the clamp using the black adapter:



Place the fitting on the end of the line, then slide it back behind the clamp. Don't forget this step!!! Put a few drops of oil on the stem of the adapter and insert it into the line in the clamp, then put the flaring tool anvil-side onto the adapter. It's important to line everything up as straight as poosible, so the first flare is even and not off-center. Placing the clamp in the vise helps to do this, and helps to get more leverage when tightening the tool:



Tighten the tool until it bottoms out on the clamp. this step makes the mushroom part of the flare:



remove the tool, and use pliers to twist and pull on the adapter to remove it from the line:



Place the tool anvil-side onto the end of the line, and tighten it to fold the lip back inside the flare (Step 8):





The tool will tend to crawl off to one side if not centered, and i couldn't use the one from JEG's. I think the machining of the metal was worse on it than the older tool. It also helped to have the small bar for tightening the older tool rather than using a wrench on the one from JEG's. It takes some muscle to work the tool. Using oil on the line, adapter and tool anvil make sit a bit easier to work with. I give credit to Roadkill for his help, and suggesting to put the clamp in the vise. i had all but given up trying to make a good end, as the flares kept going off-center. I can make about 3 good ones out of 4 tries now. It'a a hella lot easier to buy the pre-made lines!!!

JSM84
 

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Rest in Peace Friend...
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I removed the powder-coating from the end of the line so the clamp would hold better. Had a problem at first with the line slipping back while flaring it. The older clamps with the wing nuts hold better than the one in the JEG's kit, but the line would not hold with the powder-coating on it. The clamp is tightened down as far as it can on both ends.

The line kit also had instructions mentioning that the coating needs to be removed before flaring. I tried both ways, with and without the coating.
 

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Lick my balls
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nice write up, can you snap a close up pic of the black doohicky that does the mushrooming? I need a better look so I can see if I have that in the garage somewhere.
 

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Good right up. A few other things I've learned working with brake hard lines.

It's very important to remember to practice, practice, practice before you actually put one on your rig. This is one area where you don't want to skimp on tools. Good tools make all the difference in making a good double-flare. Also, don't try to be He-Man when putting the final flare on because you can and will create small cracks that will break and leak over time.

For me, I love to work with hard brake lines. Also, some tubing cutters have a deburring tool on the back side of them that works rather well.
 

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I used the tubing cutter to cut the line:

thats not the recomended procedure. It can work harden the tubing making it harder to flare and easy to cause a stress fracture. :duh

Use a cut off wheel, then debur the inside, then clean the outside with a wire wheel. the wire wheel also scuffs up the tube so the flare tool can clamp it better
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Fireguy, do you have some data or link to back that up? I don't like the cutter either, but that's what the instr say and that's what i used. I do have a cutoff wheel if it makes that much difference.

Blow all the lines with compressed air, too.
 

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It certainly happens to SOME degree, but IMO, the steel used in the lines is engineered to minimize the work-hardening effect. And the risk of burrs & debris in the line is MUCH higher any hardening by a tubing cutter. I always use a cutter.
 

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Don't forget to put the fittings on BEFORE you flare both sides!

Tell me who hasn't forgot to do that at least once?

A small tube bender is also a good tool to have when doing small lines such as those.

 

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Lick my balls
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Don't forget to put the fittings on BEFORE you flare both sides!

Tell me who hasn't forgot to do that at least once?

A small tube bender is also a good tool to have when doing small lines such as those.

:brownbag
 
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